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From the Publisher

A God-fearing person on his own desists himself from doing wrong, as he is aware of the omnipresence of the Lord. Hindu religious texts make one aware of one’s duties and of the principles of Dharma or righteous behaviour. The term ‘God-fearing’ does not mean that one is a coward. In fact, it signifies a strong aversion to doing wrong. This is what these ancient texts try to teach everybody.
As the original texts are too voluminous, we have presented their essence in the form of unique quiz books, which not only enrich the mind with the knowledge of Hinduism but also enlighten the reader on the philosophical concepts of Hinduism. The Volume-I in your hand pertains to the epic Mahabharata written by the great sage Veda Vyasa. It contains the Opening Canto, the Assembly Canto and the Forest Canto. These Cantos satiate the curiosity of the inquisitive mind quite thoroughly.

Published: Mahesh Dutt Sharma on
ISBN: 9781301388226
List price: $1.99
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