• book

From the Publisher

In issue #3 of LSD you'll find a poem by Russian classical poet Alexander Pushkin, a review of Jeremy Scahill's books Blackwater and Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield as well as an article by Mikey and a satire piece by Rich. So enjoy!

Published: Mikey Lee Ray on
ISBN: 9781301826933
List price: $0.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for LSD Issue #3
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

New York Magazine
1 min read

The Controversial Rachel Cusk

MOST DIVISIVE A Life’s Work (2001) Cusk’s elegy for her pre-motherhood self infuriates mothers and critics alike. “This isn’t what it’s like to have a baby; it’s what it’s like for a depressed and melodramatic novelist to have a baby.” (THE SUNDAY TIMES) Aftermath (2012) An unsentimental look at her divorce from her stay-at-home husband. “This is writerly greed, swooping on everything and wringing meaning from it, transforming it into something else rather than just letting it be.” (THE GUARDIAN) “Every experience, from having a tooth extracted to Cusk’s daughters’ hamsters’ inability to
Literary Hub
1 min read

Eileen Myles on the Most Interesting Nights of Their Life

In this video in support of the Festival Neue Literatur, which celebrates contemporary German-language and American fiction (this year’s theme: Queer as Volk) and begins today in New York, Eileen Myles talks about the importance of translators and FNL. “The most interesting nights of my life have been when I’ve sat down with a table of translators, because they are the most sophisticated people I know,” Myles says, which is certainly saying something, coming from a poet this legendary. They also mention the political urgency of festivals like FNL, which are important in part because of the way
The Atlantic
1 min read
Religion & Spirituality

A Graphic Novel About 17th-Century Philosophy

Dark spots across the sun, men burned at the stake, an all-powerful church that brooks no idea outside its dogma—there is no subject so imbued with drama, intrigue, and fast-paced action as 17th-century Western philosophy. And thus no medium does it justice like the graphic novel. No, really. Heretics!, a graphic novel by Steven and Ben Nadler, introduces readers to what is arguably the most interesting, important, and consequential period in the history of Western philosophy. While respecting recent scholarship on 17th-century thought, the Nadlers sought to make these stories and ideas as ac