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From the Publisher

Can a sexual proposition lead to love?

After visiting Desire, a popular club, Wendy never expected to gain the attention of the men who own the club. Evan and Drake Peterson are the reason her father rants and raves like he does. She never intends to get involved.

Evan goes after what he wants and he wants Wendy. Her beauty calls to him and all he can think about is possessing her. Drake promises her untold pleasure, and Evan proposes something she couldn't ever turn down. He offers to make all of her desires come true.

But what happens when the sexual fog lifts and the brothers claim to love her? Can Wendy learn what's in her own heart before it is too late?

Be Warned: menage sex (MFM), anal sex, sex toys

Published: Evernight Publishing on
ISBN: 9781771304078
List price: $3.99
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