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From the Publisher

The majority of people already know how to predict. For instance, you can predict your age next year. Understanding and visualizing how this prediction works is very simplistic and opens the door for predicting many different types of data. This book is the "How To" for setting up and understanding a simple predictive model.

Published: Matthew Abbitt on
ISBN: 9781301551095
List price: $5.99
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