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From the Publisher

We are happy to announce Holistic Harmony’s latest release, Free to Be Happy with Energy Psychology - by Tapping on Acupuncture Points, by Robert Elias Najemy.

Robert Najemy’s books have sold over 130,000 and have been translated into Russian, Polish, Persian, Greek and German.

Free to Be Happy is an authoritative book with crystal clear guidelines for all to employ this unbelievable discovery - the latest development in psychology, pain management, self-help and healing today.

This book gives very specific guidelines and abundant examples of how this technique has been and can be employed for solving an unbelievably large number of problems such as:
1. Fears and phobias and other unpleasant emotions
2. Physical disturbances and illness - including pain.
3. Freedom from addictions
4. Healing childhood and other traumatic experiences.
5. For removing obstacles towards increased professional and athletic performance.

Published: Robert Elias Najemy on
ISBN: 9781301978465
List price: $9.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Free to Be Happy With Energy Psychology
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  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

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