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From the Publisher

If you have ever wondered 'What is a Zen garden?' then this 50 page new publication for 2013 will tell you. Zen gardens are beautiful Japanese gardens steeped in history, religious meaning and a visual simplicity. There are many styles and many ingredients, Stones, Rocks, Moss, Sand, Gravel, Plants and Shrubs,Lanterns and Ornaments.
Japanese Zen gardens is a book that introduces the reader to the subject and presents the options available for anyone wishing to build their own garden space at home - however large or small.
Zen gardens are becoming more and more popular around the world and building one is not as difficult as you may think. With a little knowledge and following our step by step instructions with pictures you will discover how straight forward it is to build a Zen garden in your yard or garden.
Japanese Zen gardens are serene havens of tranquil beauty and the perfect antidote to a stressful world.
The author Russ Chard has written and published Japanese garden books, articles and videos for the past 10 years.

Topics: Zen, Gardening, Stress, Informative, Prescriptive, and How-To Guides

Published: M-Y Books on
ISBN: 9781909908024
List price: $2.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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