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From the Publisher

1942 was an important turning point in World War II. Britain and its allies had faced considerable challenges thus far. Beset by bombings and devastated by personal loss and the restrictions of war, the British public was losing patience with the war effort—and their prime minister. Churchill faced an uphill battle in his military efforts as well as in gathering political and public support for the struggle to come.

But when the US joined the war, at the end of 1941, the tides turned. Churchill has been quoted as saying he felt certain of the Allied victory with the US on his side—and his speeches reflect a renewed sense of hope and conviction. This collection of wartime speeches from 1942 provides an interesting historical commentary on this volatile time in history—from the point of view of one of its most prominent wartime leaders.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sir Winston Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953 “for his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values.”

Over a 64-year span, Churchill published over 40 books, many multi-volume definitive accounts of historical events to which he was a witness and participant. All are beautifully written and as accessible and relevant today as when first published.

During his fifty-year political career, Churchill served twice as Prime Minister in addition to other prominent positions—including President of the Board of Trade, First Lord of the Admiralty, Chancellor of the Exchequer, and Home Secretary. In the 1930s, Churchill was one of the first to recognize the danger of the rising Nazi power in Germany and to campaign for rearmament in Britain. His leadership and inspired broadcasts and speeches during World War II helped strengthen British resistance to Adolf Hitler—and played an important part in the Allies’ eventual triumph.

One of the most inspiring wartime leaders of modern history, Churchill was also an orator, a historian, a journalist, and an artist. All of these aspects of Churchill are fully represented in this collection of his works.

ABOUT THE SERIES

Even decades later, long after the bloody conflict of World War II has been consigned to history, Sir Winston Churchill’s words to a country at war still have the power to thrill. Arguably the greatest orator of the last hundred years, Churchill was at his best when leading Britain in times of war—sometimes exhorting, sometimes pleading, sometimes energizing, and always inspiring.

Rosetta Books offers a complete set of volumes of the wartime speeches for which Churchill was best known, presented in the original formats in which he authorized them for publication. Churchill’s oratory was cited by the Nobel Foundation in granting him the Nobel Prize for Literature. Ranging from the beginning of England’s brave stand against Hitler to the surrender of Japan and its aftermath, they bring a long and turbulent period in world history to vibrant life.

Published: RosettaBooks on
ISBN: 9780795331787
List price: $9.99
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