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From the Publisher

Rappoport treats the dinner table like a Freudian couch, asking us to lie back and spill our guts. Tracing our culinary customs from the Stone Age to the stovetop range, he illuminates our complex and often contradictory eating habits, and suggests that perhaps we are what we eat.
Published: ECW Press an imprint of ECW Press on
ISBN: 9781554902415
List price: $11.95
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