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“Save the Cheerleader, Save the World.” With that immediately memorable mantra, Heroes became the top-rated new series of fall 2006. Featuring such archetypal characters as one with a split personality, one who can fly, one who can see the future, one who can time travel — and the evil villain out to steal all of the powers for himself — the show touches our inner comic book fan, even if we’ve never cracked open a comic book. Saving the World: A Guide to Heroes will include essay analyses of the many reasons that keep Heroes’ audience tuning in each week. Authors Lynnette Porter, David Lavery, and Hillary Robson are experts in the field of television analysis, having penned books on Lost, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Deadwood, Seinfeld, The Sopranos, and many others. In this book, they will explore the history of comic books making their way to the screen, and how this show has been affected by the decades of comic book superheroes that precede it; the series’ archetypal characters; the fandom surrounding the show; its link to other current series such as Lost; creator Tim Kring and how he is the driving force behind the show. The book will include brief episode guides of each installment of the series. Saving the World will finally help the large audience of the show understand the mysteries of the series.
Published: ECW Press an imprint of ECW Press on Oct 1, 2007
ISBN: 9781554903115
List price: $10.95
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A critical response to the first season of the popular TV show.I'm on the fence with this book. Some of the essays are very good. The authors have chosen particular topics, (such Hiro's progress throughout the season), and examined them in-depth, citing concrete examples from the show and bringing in ideas from other critical forums and television series. These chapters are thorough and enjoyable, and I feel like they've given me a good groundwork on which to base my own critical response to the show.Other essays, however, are kind of all over the place. They introduce sketchy ideas, discuss them in brief, then move on to something else that may or may not be directly related to what came before. Most of these ideas would have provided enough material for an essay of their own. This brief treatment, which is mostly confined to the surveyish chapters that examine the show as a whole, doesn't really do these ideas justice or add much to the criticism surrounding the series.I think the authors would have done better to publish a book of deeper, more involved essays on particular themes, rather than attempt to do a survey so early on in the series. This show provides plenty of food for thought, but it was only one season in when this book was written. I hesitate to say that it was too early for any sort of a guide book, but I do think it could have been handled better.Recommended for Heroes fans, but take it out of the library instead of buying it.read more
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Reviews

A critical response to the first season of the popular TV show.I'm on the fence with this book. Some of the essays are very good. The authors have chosen particular topics, (such Hiro's progress throughout the season), and examined them in-depth, citing concrete examples from the show and bringing in ideas from other critical forums and television series. These chapters are thorough and enjoyable, and I feel like they've given me a good groundwork on which to base my own critical response to the show.Other essays, however, are kind of all over the place. They introduce sketchy ideas, discuss them in brief, then move on to something else that may or may not be directly related to what came before. Most of these ideas would have provided enough material for an essay of their own. This brief treatment, which is mostly confined to the surveyish chapters that examine the show as a whole, doesn't really do these ideas justice or add much to the criticism surrounding the series.I think the authors would have done better to publish a book of deeper, more involved essays on particular themes, rather than attempt to do a survey so early on in the series. This show provides plenty of food for thought, but it was only one season in when this book was written. I hesitate to say that it was too early for any sort of a guide book, but I do think it could have been handled better.Recommended for Heroes fans, but take it out of the library instead of buying it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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