Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

This accessible autobiography is the true story of one girl's determination to hold her family together during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century.

It's 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, friends, and a bright future in Communist China. But it's also the year that China's leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution—and Ji-li's world begins to fall apart. Over the next few years, people who were once her friends and neighbors turn on her and her family, forcing them to live in constant terror of arrest. When Ji-li's father is finally imprisoned, she faces the most difficult dilemma of her life.

A personal and painful memoir—a page-turner as well as excellent material for social studies curricula—Red Scarf Girl also includes a thorough glossary and pronunciation guide.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 26, 2010
ISBN: 9780062035349
List price: $4.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

A good children's-level book about the Cultural Revolution.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A great book to use in conjunction with Global history and the Chinese cultural revolution. Set in 1966, it speaks of Chairman Mao as the one who is going to cleanse China of its "fourolds" (old ideas, customs, culture, and habits of mind). Even children are recruited to uphold the new idealogy. They don their red scarves to show solidarity to the cause. But, Ji-Li can't really be a part because her family comes from a history of "landlords" and that is considered bourgeois. We see her struggle with her family heritage and desire to be something she's not. Yet, in the end, she remains true to herself even though her father is taken away and held captive. She moved to the US in 1984, became a science teacher and eventually an author.Key points: class status, struggling with the demons of your past, following ideology blindly.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jiang Ji-li is just 12 years old when the Cultural Revolution sweeps through China. Once at the top of her class, she loses both her academic standing and the respect of her peers when her family's aristocratic history is revealed. Her home is ransacked, her parents interrogated and over and over again, she is given a choice: break ties with her "black" parents or share their dismal fate. What separates this book from dozens of other Cultural Revolution memoirs is Jiang Ji-li's ability to convey a child's-eye perspective of the events she witnessed. I clearly saw the conflict she and so many other children faced: kids instinctively love and respect their parents, but at the same time, the school system preached "parents are dear, but Chairman Mao is dearer" from kindergarten on. This, coupled with a child's desire to help their country and win approval from authority figures, forced children into a tough dilemma -- protect your family or protect your country and your own future. Although I found this book interesting and poignant, it is aimed at middle school students. The writing style and ideas the book deals with are correspondingly simple. 11- to 13-year-olds should be able to read this book and learn about world history without getting too upset. For adults who already know something about the Cultural Revolution, this would be a good choice to broaden your perspective. However, if it will be your first journey to China's recent political past, try an adult-level memoir first. Red Azalea by Anchee Min and Wild Swans by Jung Chang are both excellent.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

A good children's-level book about the Cultural Revolution.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A great book to use in conjunction with Global history and the Chinese cultural revolution. Set in 1966, it speaks of Chairman Mao as the one who is going to cleanse China of its "fourolds" (old ideas, customs, culture, and habits of mind). Even children are recruited to uphold the new idealogy. They don their red scarves to show solidarity to the cause. But, Ji-Li can't really be a part because her family comes from a history of "landlords" and that is considered bourgeois. We see her struggle with her family heritage and desire to be something she's not. Yet, in the end, she remains true to herself even though her father is taken away and held captive. She moved to the US in 1984, became a science teacher and eventually an author.Key points: class status, struggling with the demons of your past, following ideology blindly.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jiang Ji-li is just 12 years old when the Cultural Revolution sweeps through China. Once at the top of her class, she loses both her academic standing and the respect of her peers when her family's aristocratic history is revealed. Her home is ransacked, her parents interrogated and over and over again, she is given a choice: break ties with her "black" parents or share their dismal fate. What separates this book from dozens of other Cultural Revolution memoirs is Jiang Ji-li's ability to convey a child's-eye perspective of the events she witnessed. I clearly saw the conflict she and so many other children faced: kids instinctively love and respect their parents, but at the same time, the school system preached "parents are dear, but Chairman Mao is dearer" from kindergarten on. This, coupled with a child's desire to help their country and win approval from authority figures, forced children into a tough dilemma -- protect your family or protect your country and your own future. Although I found this book interesting and poignant, it is aimed at middle school students. The writing style and ideas the book deals with are correspondingly simple. 11- to 13-year-olds should be able to read this book and learn about world history without getting too upset. For adults who already know something about the Cultural Revolution, this would be a good choice to broaden your perspective. However, if it will be your first journey to China's recent political past, try an adult-level memoir first. Red Azalea by Anchee Min and Wild Swans by Jung Chang are both excellent.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am similar to Ji Li, the main character of the book. I live in Shanghai and am about the same age. Personally, I think Red Scarf Girl is a book suitable for kids of all age, who are interested in learning about The Cultural Revolution.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Incredibly sad story of a child living through the cultural revolution. Well written and teeming with lessons about history and how dangerous leadership without a well determined legal system can become.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I have never studied the Cultural Revolution of China, so this book was a huge surprise to me. The book starts with 12 year old Ji-li Jiang during the beginning of the revolution. She does well in school and is very popular, but when she is selected to audition for the Central Liberation Army Arts Academy, her parents forbid her, knowing their class will effect her acceptance. Her parents try and shield her from much of the goings on, but she is still ridiculed for her social class because her grandfather was a landlord. The rise of the Red Guards starts to make the book seem like it is telling the story of the Holocaust. The Red Guards come in and search her house. Her father is detained among false accusations. She soon finds that her mother is trying to expose the Red Guards in a letter she is writing. The Red Guards come and search the house again and find the letter. Her mother and grandmother are punished and she is forced to take on the responsibility of her family. In the end, her father is released and they eventually move to America where she realizes how truly terrible Communism is, although she still feels a connection to her old country. She later starts a business in the hopes to bridge the gap between the two countries. I really enjoyed this book as I did not know much about the cultural revolution. It was interesting to read that in the end she still felt loyalties to her country, even though they were treated so badly there. I think this would be an excellent book for any high school student to read as Ji-li is easy to relate to.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd