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Stylish, convincing, wise, funny, and just in time: the ultimate non-diet book, which could radically change the way you think and live – now with more recipes.French women don’t get fat, even though they enjoy bread and pastry, wine, and regular three-course meals. Unlocking the simple secrets of this “French paradox” – how they enjoy food while staying slim and healthy – Mireille Guiliano gives us a charming, inspiring take on health and eating for our times.For anyone who has slipped out of her Zone, missed the flight to South Beach, or accidentally let a carb pass her lips, here is a positive way to stay trim, a culture’s most precious secrets recast for the twenty-first century. A life of wine, bread – even chocolate – without girth or guilt? Pourquoi pas?


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on Dec 28, 2004
ISBN: 9781400044801
List price: $9.99
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This is a no-nonsense Weight Watchers-type approach with flair and fun. Guiliano, with much humour, gives the basics to healthy, balanced living preaching moderation in eating and exercise but emphasizing on taste, time and pleasure. Being in a similar situation of growing up in France but living in Canada, I can vouch to the truth of her observations and truly enjoyed finding again all the deliciously simple recipes of my childhood. I can't wait to try them out again! This book will find its place in my kitchen.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
 I've read other reviews of this book and have been amused at the people who are offended that Guiliano is being superior and calling Americans fat. News flash, Americans. We're fat. Instead of getting offended, I jumped right into this book. It's helpful that I've always loved all things French.Guiliano didn't pen a diet book. She simply tells us what French women do differently and then gives us advice on how to incorporate it into our lives. Everyone who has ever crashed dieted knows that it's short term and doesn't really work (and potentially does more harm later on). The whole restricting everything lifestyle change rarely works either. Very few people can stick to that for long. What Guiliano suggests is making moderate changes and still being able to indulge in the food that you love.Her first suggestion is to keep a food diary for 3 weeks, no calorie counting, just writing down everything you eat and drink. Then you analyze your weak points, where you eat out of control portions or just plain overeat. Then for 3 months you start pulling back. Make portions smaller (actually, for America, that basically means just eating NORMAL portions and not our steakhouse portions that we're used to).Guiliano includes several recipes that sound great. I've already started the food diary and managed to increase my water intake by a few glasses a day. I really do feel perkier.With all my health problems, I was looking for ways to be healthier. I may not be able to change genetics but I can control what I ingest. And if I lose a few pounds with it, I won't complain.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting book, I know it's been debunked by several people but some of the points she makes are actually quite good! Little and often would appear to be the motto, quality over quantity every time!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I appreciate a lot of what she says, and I appreciate that the book is not glossy with large bold type saying "LOSE WEIGHT NOW . . . 3 MONTHS TO A SLIMMER YOU!!!" But she has an annoying style, and clearly lives an upper-class lifestyle. My worst criticism, though, is the hypocrisy of her leek soup diet. At the beginning of a book dedicated to the good life, one where you enjoy flavor and the richness of the harvest, she tells you to start by eating boiled leeks for two days straight. Boiled leeks, and the water you boiled them in. The other alternative is an unspeakable chunky mush of blended lettuce (!), carrots, leeks, and celery.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is sold as a diet book, but it really isn't. It would be much more accurate to call it a lifestyle guide. At its heart, the book is really about ditching the unhealthy, guilt-ridden American obsession with food and following those common sense observations that everyone knows, but people rarely act on. It is also about taking pleasure in the simple joys of life of which eating good food is a part. A bonus is that it comes with some very nice recipes for homestyle French food.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked this book more for it's study of French culture than it's diet tips, though every recipe I've tried from it has been excellent. I never lost any weight by trying to follow her suggestions, but I was introduced to the marvels of both leeks and homemade yogurt. A much better read overall than a typical "diet" book, but really more about lifestyles than diets.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
At the very least, this book made me think about how I eat, and has affected some of the choices I make while shopping or preparing meals. The book reads very smoothly.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
What is it about diet books that make you hungry? Is it the impending deprivation between the lines? For example, my mother’s Sunday school class all gained weight when trying the Christian based diet book, Weigh Down by Gwen Shamblin. Why? Mom claims they all had a tendency to snack while reading.Usher in a new book that puts a cultural spin on weight loss. French Women Don’t Get Fat by Mireille Guiliano is your typical diet book; nothing new or earth shaking here. The common sense tips like drink plenty of water and eat smaller portions reduce weight. No mystery really, although, we secretly feel those Frenchies hoard a skinny gene from Gallic ancestors.The book's strong point is an eye-opening glimpse into French culture. French women shop daily for fresh in-season produce and meats. French women endure many courses in one sitting by only tasting the selections and chewing slowly. Then there is the magical (natural diuretic) leek soup recipe found on page 26.Author Giliano begins the book with her own story. At 19 she spent one year in America as a French student participating in a high school exchange program. Upon her return to France, her own father greets her with, “Tu ressembles a un sac de patates.” In English that means you look like a sack of potatoes. Quel horreurs!Giliano claims she gained weight because of a weakness for pastries. Her solution, when face-to-face with dessert, eat a bite or two for taste and then launch into a funny story. As you deliver the punch line your company will have eaten their last morsel. Then out of politeness pass yours aside and enjoy coffee.As in real estate, chubbiness is all a matter of, “location, location, location”. Plop a skinny French woman in Dixie and she would be chubby in a month. First, buckle her up in a car, no more walking to the market, and introduce her to fast food. Next, teach her to marinate the Southern way; bread and soak all manner of food in hot grease until golden brown. Lastly, take away her smokes, a sure 10 lb. gain. French women see cigarettes as a classic fashion accessory. The French term “le smoking” actually means dinner-jacket.To recap, French women don’t get fat because they don’t live in the American South and they probably smoke. So, don’t feel so guilty, we have more obstacles to overcome.The book has an instant appeal for those of us that think France is so romantic. Who wouldn’t want to live like Gigi, dressed in black cigarette pants, white swingy top and black beret toting market fresh French bread, wine and flowers ala Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina through the cobbled streets of Paris.Listen, save your money on this book and if you must read it, check it out at the library. If you are really serious about losing weight here are the keys. Drink water, exercise regularly and do not eat anything white specifically flour, sugar and salt. When you reach your target weight, eat slowly and in moderation. Vive la difference!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good book with lots of helpful advice for gaining a better sense of perspective on self and your relationship to food. Food is about life and love and laughter, Mireille counsels, not deprivation. Though smug in parts, it is an approachable and convivial guide to mindful eating, set in the city of lights.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The recipes were too complicated for me to actually make. I didn't read the entire book - giving it away instead. Hopefully someone else will enjoy this.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another one caves in to media hype. But believe it or not, it's a really interesting book. It helped immensely that I got a lot of her cultural references in regards to food, but it sure made me re-evluate how my eating habits have changed (for the worse) when I moved in with an Anglo male dominated household. I'm not ready to completely change over my eating habits, but I make this choice consciously, and I can live with that.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was a relatively quick read (I read it while at the gym) and it has lots of tips for women who want to be attractive like the French. Like: drink water when you feel hungry, it's probably what your body is asking for, and if still hungry after 20 minutes, then eat.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Written by a French woman that gained weight during a stay in the U.S. when a teenager, the book is full of tricks and frames of mind that helped her lose weight and keep it off. She offers attitudes and lifestyles practiced by French women to keep trim and healthy. She also provides interesting and healthy recipes.As the author repeats throughout, this is not a diet book but a book about lifestyle and attitude regarding food. Taking pleasure in food, using all of your senses, moving around, and eating only until satisfied are some of the core concepts.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I thought this book had a lot of good advice, and it was a really interesting look at French culture from an insider's point of view. Actually, it was even better because the author is also an American - she was raised in France but then married an American, so she has good insight on both cultures. This was nice since she wasn't too hard on Americans, and she didn't come across as being all "The French are better, nyeh!"
I guess this book was not structured enough for me, but the whole point of the book was not to follow some structured régime (and I believe that word actually means "diet" in French). It was about changing your culturally ingrained American habits and making slight shifts and fixes to how you live.
This book however was a little annoying to me with its very nonvegan recipes (can we say butter, heavy cream, eggs, cheese, yogurt, duck, chicken, fish, oysters, horse! - which by the way she never liked eating for "sentimental" reasons but her parents made her every week when she was growing up), but that was to be expected since French cooking isn't exactly friendly to les végétaliens. I did appreciate her points about eating things in season and using the very best quality ingredients, so that your food needs very little added flavor in the form of fat and/or sugar.
So, read this book if you're a Francophile or just interested in another culture but don't read it if you're looking for some secret miracle cure - kind of ironic since she nicknamed her French doctor who helped her lose the weight she had gained in America Dr. Miracle.


read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting, but I wish I'd picked it up from the library instead of buying it. It was one of those guilty fat girl moments.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Who can argue with a diet philosophy that embraces chocolate. Just make sure it's the good stuff and eat less of it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Simple....common sense....and yet intriguing from the french perspective. A gentle reminder that the first few bites are truly the most wonderful, and so who really needs more than that. From the first few pages, I wanted more than anything to simply become this woman's best friend. Mme. Giulano has a gift for speaking to other women.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
French Women Don't Get Fat, and after reading Mireille Guiliano's book, I now know why.This is a fascinating book on many levels. Part memoir, part diet book, part cookbook, it it a wholly satisfying read.Mireille (meeRAY) was a normal teenager until she came to America as an exchange student. When she returned home after living like an American for a year, she was 20 pounds heavier. Her family was shocked. But her family doctor gave her a simple plan to regain her optimum weight, and the women of her family shared their secrets for maintaining her optimum weight. Now, Mireille shares that plan and those secrets with the rest of us.I cannot wait to try her "Miracle Leek Soup," which sounds divine and can help a woman drop several pounds in just a weekend. Her other recipes sound equally delicious, and her suggestions for desserts will have a special following among women whose sweet tooth is destroying their figures.The little tips and tricks, the idea of "compensations," these are painless adjustments that add up to pounds and inches kept off of the body. Nothing could be better. And from Mireille's explanations, nothing could be easier. Vive la femmes de France!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another one caves in to media hype. But believe it or not, it's a really interesting book. It helped immensely that I got a lot of her cultural references in regards to food, but it sure made me re-evluate how my eating habits have changed (for the worse) when I moved in with an Anglo male dominated household. I'm not ready to completely change over my eating habits, but I make this choice consciously, and I can live with that.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The message is very simple: Enjoy what you eat, but eat less of it. There also are a number of whity stories and yummie recipes sprinkled about in the book, giving it a more personal feel.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A sensible approach to eating and exercise that encourages you to enjoy food and life, and to think long-term about health. Told from a first person perspective, and with frank acknowledgment of the challenges in maintaining a healthy weight.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This eating philosophy is quite similar to that of Bob Greene and Dr. Phil, enjoy your food, in moderation, get moving, don't "diet", but change your lifestyle and the way you think about food and eating, make it an experience, don't scarf down your dinner at the kitchen sink and never eat in front of the tv. The French haven't cornered the market on most of the things she discusses in this book. America used to live this way before we tripled our portion size, got too busy to cook, invented the TV dinner, and built communities based on the idea of driving everywhere rather than walking.

I did love her description of the French market and I envied it. She compared the experience of grocery shopping in France to shopping in New York City, which is still not the same as grocery shopping in the Midwest. So a lot of her suggestions are unfortunately not practical. Believe me, I wish we could get rid of the Wal-mart Supercenter and I could walk to the outdoor market every other day to get my super-fresh ingredients to make my dinner. I would challenge her to come here and go grocery shopping with me. (Forget about buying fish, unless you want fresh-frozen Tilapia from China- ew) Okay, once in a while I can get Alaskan salmon.

I completely agreed with her about the chapter on water. Even if you think you're drinking enough water, you're probably not. She motivated me to drink more and more. (excuse me, I need to go to the bathroom).
And I was glad to see that like me, she's a big yogurt fan. I also liked the French philosophy on wine. I thought it was a much healthier view of drinking than a lot of Americans have.

I have to disagree about the going to the gym part. We Americans have to go to the gym because it's not feasible for us to walk everywhere we need to go. French women don't like to sweat- well who does, but there is something satisfying to putting in a good workout at the gym, and you end up having more energy and sleep better. I think one's own exercise routine is a combination of personal preference and what fits best into your lifestyle.

All in all, this was a fun read compared to other "diet" books. And the title is quite true, so there are some motivating suggestions to be gleaned from the book. Especially when she talks about how as we age, we need to re-evaluate our eating habits and she breaks it down into age groups. I think to truly embrace all of her suggestions though, you'd have to move to France, which after reading about some of her descriptions I'm seriously considering.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

This is a no-nonsense Weight Watchers-type approach with flair and fun. Guiliano, with much humour, gives the basics to healthy, balanced living preaching moderation in eating and exercise but emphasizing on taste, time and pleasure. Being in a similar situation of growing up in France but living in Canada, I can vouch to the truth of her observations and truly enjoyed finding again all the deliciously simple recipes of my childhood. I can't wait to try them out again! This book will find its place in my kitchen.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
 I've read other reviews of this book and have been amused at the people who are offended that Guiliano is being superior and calling Americans fat. News flash, Americans. We're fat. Instead of getting offended, I jumped right into this book. It's helpful that I've always loved all things French.Guiliano didn't pen a diet book. She simply tells us what French women do differently and then gives us advice on how to incorporate it into our lives. Everyone who has ever crashed dieted knows that it's short term and doesn't really work (and potentially does more harm later on). The whole restricting everything lifestyle change rarely works either. Very few people can stick to that for long. What Guiliano suggests is making moderate changes and still being able to indulge in the food that you love.Her first suggestion is to keep a food diary for 3 weeks, no calorie counting, just writing down everything you eat and drink. Then you analyze your weak points, where you eat out of control portions or just plain overeat. Then for 3 months you start pulling back. Make portions smaller (actually, for America, that basically means just eating NORMAL portions and not our steakhouse portions that we're used to).Guiliano includes several recipes that sound great. I've already started the food diary and managed to increase my water intake by a few glasses a day. I really do feel perkier.With all my health problems, I was looking for ways to be healthier. I may not be able to change genetics but I can control what I ingest. And if I lose a few pounds with it, I won't complain.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting book, I know it's been debunked by several people but some of the points she makes are actually quite good! Little and often would appear to be the motto, quality over quantity every time!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I appreciate a lot of what she says, and I appreciate that the book is not glossy with large bold type saying "LOSE WEIGHT NOW . . . 3 MONTHS TO A SLIMMER YOU!!!" But she has an annoying style, and clearly lives an upper-class lifestyle. My worst criticism, though, is the hypocrisy of her leek soup diet. At the beginning of a book dedicated to the good life, one where you enjoy flavor and the richness of the harvest, she tells you to start by eating boiled leeks for two days straight. Boiled leeks, and the water you boiled them in. The other alternative is an unspeakable chunky mush of blended lettuce (!), carrots, leeks, and celery.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is sold as a diet book, but it really isn't. It would be much more accurate to call it a lifestyle guide. At its heart, the book is really about ditching the unhealthy, guilt-ridden American obsession with food and following those common sense observations that everyone knows, but people rarely act on. It is also about taking pleasure in the simple joys of life of which eating good food is a part. A bonus is that it comes with some very nice recipes for homestyle French food.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked this book more for it's study of French culture than it's diet tips, though every recipe I've tried from it has been excellent. I never lost any weight by trying to follow her suggestions, but I was introduced to the marvels of both leeks and homemade yogurt. A much better read overall than a typical "diet" book, but really more about lifestyles than diets.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
At the very least, this book made me think about how I eat, and has affected some of the choices I make while shopping or preparing meals. The book reads very smoothly.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
What is it about diet books that make you hungry? Is it the impending deprivation between the lines? For example, my mother’s Sunday school class all gained weight when trying the Christian based diet book, Weigh Down by Gwen Shamblin. Why? Mom claims they all had a tendency to snack while reading.Usher in a new book that puts a cultural spin on weight loss. French Women Don’t Get Fat by Mireille Guiliano is your typical diet book; nothing new or earth shaking here. The common sense tips like drink plenty of water and eat smaller portions reduce weight. No mystery really, although, we secretly feel those Frenchies hoard a skinny gene from Gallic ancestors.The book's strong point is an eye-opening glimpse into French culture. French women shop daily for fresh in-season produce and meats. French women endure many courses in one sitting by only tasting the selections and chewing slowly. Then there is the magical (natural diuretic) leek soup recipe found on page 26.Author Giliano begins the book with her own story. At 19 she spent one year in America as a French student participating in a high school exchange program. Upon her return to France, her own father greets her with, “Tu ressembles a un sac de patates.” In English that means you look like a sack of potatoes. Quel horreurs!Giliano claims she gained weight because of a weakness for pastries. Her solution, when face-to-face with dessert, eat a bite or two for taste and then launch into a funny story. As you deliver the punch line your company will have eaten their last morsel. Then out of politeness pass yours aside and enjoy coffee.As in real estate, chubbiness is all a matter of, “location, location, location”. Plop a skinny French woman in Dixie and she would be chubby in a month. First, buckle her up in a car, no more walking to the market, and introduce her to fast food. Next, teach her to marinate the Southern way; bread and soak all manner of food in hot grease until golden brown. Lastly, take away her smokes, a sure 10 lb. gain. French women see cigarettes as a classic fashion accessory. The French term “le smoking” actually means dinner-jacket.To recap, French women don’t get fat because they don’t live in the American South and they probably smoke. So, don’t feel so guilty, we have more obstacles to overcome.The book has an instant appeal for those of us that think France is so romantic. Who wouldn’t want to live like Gigi, dressed in black cigarette pants, white swingy top and black beret toting market fresh French bread, wine and flowers ala Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina through the cobbled streets of Paris.Listen, save your money on this book and if you must read it, check it out at the library. If you are really serious about losing weight here are the keys. Drink water, exercise regularly and do not eat anything white specifically flour, sugar and salt. When you reach your target weight, eat slowly and in moderation. Vive la difference!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A good book with lots of helpful advice for gaining a better sense of perspective on self and your relationship to food. Food is about life and love and laughter, Mireille counsels, not deprivation. Though smug in parts, it is an approachable and convivial guide to mindful eating, set in the city of lights.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The recipes were too complicated for me to actually make. I didn't read the entire book - giving it away instead. Hopefully someone else will enjoy this.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another one caves in to media hype. But believe it or not, it's a really interesting book. It helped immensely that I got a lot of her cultural references in regards to food, but it sure made me re-evluate how my eating habits have changed (for the worse) when I moved in with an Anglo male dominated household. I'm not ready to completely change over my eating habits, but I make this choice consciously, and I can live with that.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was a relatively quick read (I read it while at the gym) and it has lots of tips for women who want to be attractive like the French. Like: drink water when you feel hungry, it's probably what your body is asking for, and if still hungry after 20 minutes, then eat.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Written by a French woman that gained weight during a stay in the U.S. when a teenager, the book is full of tricks and frames of mind that helped her lose weight and keep it off. She offers attitudes and lifestyles practiced by French women to keep trim and healthy. She also provides interesting and healthy recipes.As the author repeats throughout, this is not a diet book but a book about lifestyle and attitude regarding food. Taking pleasure in food, using all of your senses, moving around, and eating only until satisfied are some of the core concepts.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I thought this book had a lot of good advice, and it was a really interesting look at French culture from an insider's point of view. Actually, it was even better because the author is also an American - she was raised in France but then married an American, so she has good insight on both cultures. This was nice since she wasn't too hard on Americans, and she didn't come across as being all "The French are better, nyeh!"
I guess this book was not structured enough for me, but the whole point of the book was not to follow some structured régime (and I believe that word actually means "diet" in French). It was about changing your culturally ingrained American habits and making slight shifts and fixes to how you live.
This book however was a little annoying to me with its very nonvegan recipes (can we say butter, heavy cream, eggs, cheese, yogurt, duck, chicken, fish, oysters, horse! - which by the way she never liked eating for "sentimental" reasons but her parents made her every week when she was growing up), but that was to be expected since French cooking isn't exactly friendly to les végétaliens. I did appreciate her points about eating things in season and using the very best quality ingredients, so that your food needs very little added flavor in the form of fat and/or sugar.
So, read this book if you're a Francophile or just interested in another culture but don't read it if you're looking for some secret miracle cure - kind of ironic since she nicknamed her French doctor who helped her lose the weight she had gained in America Dr. Miracle.


Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting, but I wish I'd picked it up from the library instead of buying it. It was one of those guilty fat girl moments.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Who can argue with a diet philosophy that embraces chocolate. Just make sure it's the good stuff and eat less of it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Simple....common sense....and yet intriguing from the french perspective. A gentle reminder that the first few bites are truly the most wonderful, and so who really needs more than that. From the first few pages, I wanted more than anything to simply become this woman's best friend. Mme. Giulano has a gift for speaking to other women.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
French Women Don't Get Fat, and after reading Mireille Guiliano's book, I now know why.This is a fascinating book on many levels. Part memoir, part diet book, part cookbook, it it a wholly satisfying read.Mireille (meeRAY) was a normal teenager until she came to America as an exchange student. When she returned home after living like an American for a year, she was 20 pounds heavier. Her family was shocked. But her family doctor gave her a simple plan to regain her optimum weight, and the women of her family shared their secrets for maintaining her optimum weight. Now, Mireille shares that plan and those secrets with the rest of us.I cannot wait to try her "Miracle Leek Soup," which sounds divine and can help a woman drop several pounds in just a weekend. Her other recipes sound equally delicious, and her suggestions for desserts will have a special following among women whose sweet tooth is destroying their figures.The little tips and tricks, the idea of "compensations," these are painless adjustments that add up to pounds and inches kept off of the body. Nothing could be better. And from Mireille's explanations, nothing could be easier. Vive la femmes de France!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another one caves in to media hype. But believe it or not, it's a really interesting book. It helped immensely that I got a lot of her cultural references in regards to food, but it sure made me re-evluate how my eating habits have changed (for the worse) when I moved in with an Anglo male dominated household. I'm not ready to completely change over my eating habits, but I make this choice consciously, and I can live with that.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The message is very simple: Enjoy what you eat, but eat less of it. There also are a number of whity stories and yummie recipes sprinkled about in the book, giving it a more personal feel.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A sensible approach to eating and exercise that encourages you to enjoy food and life, and to think long-term about health. Told from a first person perspective, and with frank acknowledgment of the challenges in maintaining a healthy weight.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This eating philosophy is quite similar to that of Bob Greene and Dr. Phil, enjoy your food, in moderation, get moving, don't "diet", but change your lifestyle and the way you think about food and eating, make it an experience, don't scarf down your dinner at the kitchen sink and never eat in front of the tv. The French haven't cornered the market on most of the things she discusses in this book. America used to live this way before we tripled our portion size, got too busy to cook, invented the TV dinner, and built communities based on the idea of driving everywhere rather than walking.

I did love her description of the French market and I envied it. She compared the experience of grocery shopping in France to shopping in New York City, which is still not the same as grocery shopping in the Midwest. So a lot of her suggestions are unfortunately not practical. Believe me, I wish we could get rid of the Wal-mart Supercenter and I could walk to the outdoor market every other day to get my super-fresh ingredients to make my dinner. I would challenge her to come here and go grocery shopping with me. (Forget about buying fish, unless you want fresh-frozen Tilapia from China- ew) Okay, once in a while I can get Alaskan salmon.

I completely agreed with her about the chapter on water. Even if you think you're drinking enough water, you're probably not. She motivated me to drink more and more. (excuse me, I need to go to the bathroom).
And I was glad to see that like me, she's a big yogurt fan. I also liked the French philosophy on wine. I thought it was a much healthier view of drinking than a lot of Americans have.

I have to disagree about the going to the gym part. We Americans have to go to the gym because it's not feasible for us to walk everywhere we need to go. French women don't like to sweat- well who does, but there is something satisfying to putting in a good workout at the gym, and you end up having more energy and sleep better. I think one's own exercise routine is a combination of personal preference and what fits best into your lifestyle.

All in all, this was a fun read compared to other "diet" books. And the title is quite true, so there are some motivating suggestions to be gleaned from the book. Especially when she talks about how as we age, we need to re-evaluate our eating habits and she breaks it down into age groups. I think to truly embrace all of her suggestions though, you'd have to move to France, which after reading about some of her descriptions I'm seriously considering.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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