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From the Publisher

After having worked in the Bar/Restaurant business most of my life, I have collected a whole lot of recipes. Some handed down through the generations, some given by friends and some of my own, all tried and tested.
One day I decided to put them in order and thought that there were so many good recipes I felt I should share them with you.

Published: Louise Savelsberg on
ISBN: 9781310401213
List price: $0.99
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