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Beloved author C. S. Lewis is our trusted guide in this intimate day-by-day companion offering his distinctive and celebrated wisdom. Amidst the bustle of our daily experience, A Year with C. S. Lewis provides the necessary respite and inspiration to meet the many challenges we face in our lives. Ruminating on such themes as the nature of love, the existence of miracles, overcoming a devastating loss, and discovering a profound faith, Lewis offers unflinchingly honest insight for each day of the year.

These daily meditations have been culled from Lewis's celebrated Signature Classics: Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain, Miracles, and A Grief Observed, as well as from the distinguished works The Weight of Glory and The Abolition of Man.

Throughout this elegant daybook the reader will find poignant biographical com-mentary about C. S. Lewis's life that offers a remarkable portrait of Lewis in the context of his work. As each day unfolds, we embark on a path of discovery with a friend by your side. A Year with C. S. Lewis is the perfect com-panion for everyone who cherishes Lewis's timeless words.

Topics: Devotion, Christianity, Spirituality , Meditation, Inspirational, and Inklings

Published: HarperCollins on Mar 17, 2009
ISBN: 9780061757648
List price: $13.99
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This book is a collection of writings from various C.S. Lewis books like 'The Problem of Pain', 'The Screwtape Letters' and 'Mere Christianity'. A few paragraphs per day for the year. Worthwhile for keeping Lewis' personal thoughts about big subjects to the fore.read more
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Bits and pieces of his complex writings easily digestedread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
C. S. Lewis'book A year with C. S. Lewis. 365 daily readings from his classic works is edited as a devotional calendar. For everyday of the year, in chronological order from January 1 through December 31, the book consists of excerpts from a number of C.S. Lewis' philosophical and spiritual books. Philosophical and spiritual means Christian, in this context. The excerpts are taken from The Abolition of Man, The Great Divorce, A Grief Observed, Mere Christianity, Miracles, The Problem of pain, The Screwtape Letters, and The Weight of Glory. From each of these works, short readings are chosen for every day of the year. There is no discernible logic to the selection and spread over the year. However, while on most devotional calendars selections for a day are "stand-alone" pieces, presenting a selections of disconnected pieces every day, this book by Lewis cannot be read in that way, because some days would have to be read consecutively, as entries could otherwise not be understood. There are many such short series, which require quite concentrated reading, and since the book consists of rather philosophical texts, a day-by-day reading is rather disruptive (although I suppose Christians are quite used to that kind of reading mode). Rather superfluous seem the sparse, ultra-short and factual notes on some pages, referring to facts and events in C.S. Lewis' life.From a reading of this book, C.S. Lewis appears as a deeply, and dogmatically religious person. The aim of the book is quite clearly to convert readers to Christianity. References to God or Jesus appear in multiplicity in almost every paragraph, telling readers how misguided they are when they do not believe. The main theme in all excerpts is the proof of the existence of God. In this book, Lewis is dogmatic and uninspiring.What a horror to include this book in the Library of the International Space Station .read more
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This book is a collection of writings from various C.S. Lewis books like 'The Problem of Pain', 'The Screwtape Letters' and 'Mere Christianity'. A few paragraphs per day for the year. Worthwhile for keeping Lewis' personal thoughts about big subjects to the fore.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Bits and pieces of his complex writings easily digested
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
C. S. Lewis'book A year with C. S. Lewis. 365 daily readings from his classic works is edited as a devotional calendar. For everyday of the year, in chronological order from January 1 through December 31, the book consists of excerpts from a number of C.S. Lewis' philosophical and spiritual books. Philosophical and spiritual means Christian, in this context. The excerpts are taken from The Abolition of Man, The Great Divorce, A Grief Observed, Mere Christianity, Miracles, The Problem of pain, The Screwtape Letters, and The Weight of Glory. From each of these works, short readings are chosen for every day of the year. There is no discernible logic to the selection and spread over the year. However, while on most devotional calendars selections for a day are "stand-alone" pieces, presenting a selections of disconnected pieces every day, this book by Lewis cannot be read in that way, because some days would have to be read consecutively, as entries could otherwise not be understood. There are many such short series, which require quite concentrated reading, and since the book consists of rather philosophical texts, a day-by-day reading is rather disruptive (although I suppose Christians are quite used to that kind of reading mode). Rather superfluous seem the sparse, ultra-short and factual notes on some pages, referring to facts and events in C.S. Lewis' life.From a reading of this book, C.S. Lewis appears as a deeply, and dogmatically religious person. The aim of the book is quite clearly to convert readers to Christianity. References to God or Jesus appear in multiplicity in almost every paragraph, telling readers how misguided they are when they do not believe. The main theme in all excerpts is the proof of the existence of God. In this book, Lewis is dogmatic and uninspiring.What a horror to include this book in the Library of the International Space Station .
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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