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One of fiction's most audaciously original talents, Neil Gaiman now gives us a mythology for a modern age -- complete with dark prophecy, family dysfunction, mystical deceptions, and killer birds. Not to mention a lime.

Anansi Boys
God is dead. Meet the kids.

When Fat Charlie's dad named something, it stuck. Like calling Fat Charlie "Fat Charlie." Even now, twenty years later, Charlie Nancy can't shake that name, one of the many embarrassing "gifts" his father bestowed -- before he dropped dead on a karaoke stage and ruined Fat Charlie's life.

Mr. Nancy left Fat Charlie things. Things like the tall, good-looking stranger who appears on Charlie's doorstep, who appears to be the brother he never knew. A brother as different from Charlie as night is from day, a brother who's going to show Charlie how to lighten up and have a little fun ... just like Dear Old Dad. And all of a sudden, life starts getting very interesting for Fat Charlie.

Because, you see, Charlie's dad wasn't just any dad. He was Anansi, a trickster god, the spider-god. Anansi is the spirit of rebellion, able to overturn the social order, create wealth out of thin air, and baffle the devil. Some said he could cheat even Death himself.

Returning to the territory he so brilliantly explored in his masterful New York Times bestseller, American Gods, the incomparable Neil Gaiman offers up a work of dazzling ingenuity, a kaleidoscopic journey deep into myth that is at once startling, terrifying, exhilarating, and fiercely funny -- a true wonder of a novel that confirms Stephen King's glowing assessment of the author as "a treasure-house of story, and we are lucky to have him."

Topics: England, Florida, Magic, Mystical, Family, British Author, Folk and Fairy Tales, Male Author, Mythology, Brothers, Gods & Goddesses, Animals, Supernatural Powers, Alternate Universe, Siblings, Suspenseful, Dark, Birds, Mistaken Identity, London, Adventurous, Dramatic, Magical Realism, and Speculative Fiction

Published: HarperCollins on Jan 1, 2005
ISBN: 9780061794971
List price: $4.99
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one of my favesread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I moved on to this book immediately after finishing American Gods. If you haven't read American Gods, I recommend reading that book first. The two stories are not mutually exclusive but I feel Anansi Boys is more fun if you are already familiar with Gaiman's interpretation of Anansi.

This is a fast-paced read, sprinkled with clever humor and references to mythology, Anansi the Spider in particular. As with American Gods, Gaiman proves once again that ordinary fellows can be fascinating when they find themselves dealing with the supernatural and coming to terms with it. Look for a fun, entertaining trip when you start this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A real classicread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
this was a good book. the pacing of the book was a little wierd, it alternated from being really fast to really slow. the charachters were hit and miss. but it is entertaining, and some of the stuff in the book was very funny.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Audio Book. A modern fairy tale about two sons of Anansi who must reconcile their differences to face the common threat. The story is more non-fantasy as it focuses on character interaction and family relationships, although Gaiman does a great job of weaving the supernatural in. Overall I was a little dissapointed and expected more innovation from the unique concept. Gaiman also has some very clever wordings, but several characters seemed like mere plot devices. The reader was good, although it can get tiresome to listen to many takes on black British voices. As a previous reviewer notes, if you enjoy this book, definitely check out Christopher Moore. I have the same opinion that Moore is better at this style by far.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting and funny. Highly enjoyableread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked American Gods more, and I felt that this book dragged a bit.BUT, it was worth reading...read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Kept waiting for it to turn into a sequel to American Gods, but it never did. Which left me disappointed. Probably would have liked it better had I realized that going in.Oh well.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As I was reading Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys, I was inspired to write a few blogs in advance, something that hasn't happened before (at least not merely from reading a book--I've had several "genius" blog ideas in advance, some of which have made it live). And since I wasn't sure how long I was going to take to finish the novel, I jotted them down elsewhere and waited to see if they still had merit. I think they do. Here's the first of three installments, this one from when I was still in the first third of the book. Part II like my commas. I like them fluttering about the text, adding on little bits of information, inserting asides, tucking away last-minute thoughts into otherwise rather rambling sentences. When I edit, whether it's self editing as I write or editing a novel, a blog, or sometimes even an email, most of what I do is straighten sentences out, organize them, do the literary equivalent of straightening the tie against the collar of my sentences, if that makes sense to anyone but me. Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys is not doing me any favors either. If ever there were a novel written for lovers of commas and the interjections of rambling side-thoughts of a character scattered amidst the factual information being delivered by a sentence, this is the book. (Having never read another Gaiman novel before, I can't say if they're all like this. I have a feeling they're not, since the style so aptly fits the character.) Part II I can't decide if I like Neil Gaiman's style or not. Okay, that's not accurate. I like his style. It fits the character. What I really don't like is the main character. Fat Charlie is so weak, there is nothing to root for. Every chance he gets to redeem himself, to fight back, to take a stand, he wimps out. It's not a trait I like in a person or a character. I like to read books about characters I like, not characters I like to hate. I spend a lot of time with each book (especially now that I'm trying to slow down and study them a little, per Prose's comments). So reading about a character that I just plain don't like is like inviting people that I don't like to dinner. All the fun things, all the shared conversations, are drained dry, sucked of fun. It's not something I would do to myself in real life. And yet… Yet, I argued with myself every time I thought, "Let's just skim ahead and find out what happens, put this book aside, and go back to enjoying the rest of the books on my shelves." I couldn't make myself do it. I want to continue to read, if only, I decided, for one simple reason: Gaiman has no qualms about making his characters miserable. Not just making their lives miserable and yet having them buoyed by some inner strengths through the rough times. Nope. Not Gaiman. He leaves Fat Charlie to suffer, and suffer, and just when it couldn't—shouldn't—get worse, Gaiman adds a little more to Fat Charlie's load. As an author who cringes when putting my favorite characters through tough ordeals, it's a good lesson for me to watch a master perform. Books without conflicts are dull. Characters who have it easy are no fun. I understand this, but try spending a month or two with a person, and during that time wishing them ill will at every turn. It's hard. So I continued. Will I read another Gaiman novel? Not for a long time, if ever. Am I glad I did. Yes. Frustratingly, yes. Part III (This is from a few days after I finished the book, about ten days after I wrote Part II.) Did I like Anansi Boys when it’s all said and done? The fact that I’m still talking about it says a lot. Yes, I ended up liking it. I liked the character growth. Fat Charlie grew on me, as he was supposed to. I liked the fantastical elements interwoven. I liked that it got me out of my comfort zone. (I say this, having finished it and now being back within my comfort zone.) Am I ready to rush out an buy another Neil Gaiman book? Definitely not. Will I ever? Yes. Reading this book made it hard for me to find the next book to read. For me, that’s a good sign. It means I was so in an author’s world that I’m not ready to leave it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Modern Carribean folktale, fantasy. A lot of fun. I loved it enough to read it Again!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Neil Gaiman brilliantly weaves humor together with morbidity in this enjoyable story.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was an easy and enjoyable read that solidifies Gaiman's name as a storyteller. He uses Anansi tales from West African and Carribean folklore as a root, not a crutch for the story. Most characters were designed with a rough and tumble mix of flair and flaw that is appealing to readers, and typical Gaiman humor peppers the dialogue. However, perhaps because of the number of involved characters in a relatively short book, readers might not connect to the characters on the level they might have wished they could.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I remember Gaiman from comics and was excited to see he had moved to novels. Anansi Boys is no disappointment. I immediately liked Fat Charlie as an honest and defective main character and equally hated the antagonist, Grahame. Gaiman builds scenes that easily paint themselves in your mind and make the experience of reading almost surreal. I can gauge how much I like a book by the speed at which I read it and I savored each word. I was disappointed when it ended because the ride was over. On the other hand, I had a different experience with American Gods.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
For me, “Anansi Boys” was one third Douglas Adams, one third Robert Rankin, one third Jasper Fforde and one third Neil Gaiman. (I know, but it’s that kind of book.)There’s the “wacky things happen when you least expect it, but roll with it” aspect that I always enjoy. An ordinary bedroom in a London flat can suddenly seem the size of a football field with a different view out the window than what is really there, one person can be seen as a completely different person even to those who know him best, and there are gods walking the earth. Supernatural meeting the mundane with witty banter along the way.I certainly wouldn’t say this is one of my favorite books of this type – but it was an enjoyable read. I picked it up mostly because I recognized Gaiman’s name from Coraline which my kids saw and liked. Based on that frame of reference that I had, this book was NOTHING like that. Which is fine. Oh, but before I go further, I should mention that the main character’s name is Fat Charlie.“Fat Charlie tried to remember what people did in prison to pass the time, but all he could come up with was keeping secret diaries and hiding things in their bottoms. He had nothing to write on, and felt that a definite measure of how well one was getting on in life was not having to hide things in one’s bottom.”It’s an interesting story with colorful characters as Fat Charlie discovers the world behind the one he had been inhabiting all his life. He has a good set of eyes with which the reader can see this unusual world, and sometimes his vision provides the reader with more than one might expect.“Different creatures have different eyes. Human eyes (unlike, say, a cat’s eyes, or an octopus’s) are only made to see one version of reality at a time. Fat Charlie saw one thing with his eyes, and he saw something else with his mind, and in the gulf between the two things, madness waited. He could feel a wild panic welling up inside him, and he took a deep breath and held it in while his heart thudded against his ribcage. He forced himself to believe his eyes, not his mind.”Fat Charlie is the definition of everyman, plodding along through life until he is forced to learn more about his father and his newly discovered brother, Spider.“If he (Spider) had not been perfectly certain of his own sanity, certain to a degree that normally is found only in people who have concluded that they’re definitely Julius Caesar and have been sent to save the world, he might have thought he was going mad.”I guess, in the end, I enjoyed this book but didn’t love it. I liked Gaiman’s easy writing style and most of the supernatural goofiness and found several of the parts to be funny in a gentle way.“Charlie pushed his fedora back onto his head. Some hats can only be worn if you’re willing to be jaunty, to set them at an angle and to walk beneath them with a spring in your stride as if you’re only a step away from dancing. They demand a lot of you. This hat was one of those, and Charlie was up to it.”Charlie, who somewhere along the way, stopped being Fat Charlie and became a man of his own. With a jaunty hat.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked this book better than American Gods, although the subject is related, I preferred the smaller scale of Anansi Boys. It felt like American Gods tried to fit an enormous amount of material and territory into one story. This book feels more intimate and comfortable in scale and style, and I think it's a more engaging story.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Much better written than his earlier work. I really like him because of his obsession with gods. You can see why he was a comic book writer. He didn't explore Anansi's trickery enough, but I did like his ventures into folktale styles. I was not bored in the least.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I haven't read Neil gaiman in a while, and I was surprised at how much I noticed his writing style and technique this time. I think it detracted slightly from my enjoyment, as I found it hard to immerse myself in the story without going 'Ooh, isn't that an interesting way to do it?'. Having said that, it was an awesome story. he's one of those insanely talented writers that make you look bad.read more
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Great read! What a web Gaiman can weave with Spider and his brother. I will definitely read this one again.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I don't read much fiction, and I have quite a phobia about spiders. I would have bet real money that I would never read - much less enjoy - a work of fiction with even the most tenuous connection to spiders. I bought Anansi Boys as a gift for my nephew, based on favorable reviews in LT. Didn't have time to subject it to my usual 50-page test because Powell's was closing, but I thought I should at least preview it, to make sure it wasn't totally unsuitable. When I got it home, I carefully set aside the dust jacket, so I wouldn't mess it up (and so I wouldn't have to touch the drawing of a cobweb) and began to read. Instead of stopping at 50 pages, I read through the entire book in one weekend. This is even more unusual than reading fiction about spiders - I always have several books in progress, and usually read only a chapter before switching to something else. I did have two bad moments, when I turned a page and found a huge drawing of a spider. I barely managed to refrain from throwing the book across the room. Aside from that, this book was quite enjoyable. I will probably read another by Mr. Gaiman sometime - as long as spiders are not involved.read more
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This was lovely and vivid and fun--a wonderful book to be the last book of the summer (I start my PhD orientation tomorrow!). I'd describe it as something like Gaiman's [Neverwhere], but with a heavy touch of Christopher Moore-like humor thrown in. It took a bit to pull me in, but did sooner than later, and then kept me hooked. The world was wonderful, as it always is with Gaiman, and the characters unbelievably realistic for how fantastical they were. Much fun, and recommended. (One Warning: You'll finish this book desperately yearning for a quick jaunt to the caribbean.)read more
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I read American Gods a few years ago and found the concept interesting, but never connected to the characters. I was told at the time, Anansi Boys was better.Yes and no.Gaiman is a brilliant writer, no question, but for several reasons this book didn't connect for me. The characters are fully realized, yet the main characters--Fat Charlie and Spider--are rather unlikeable. Fat Charlie is a hapless everyman, and Spider is every bit a trickster god's son. Following Fat Charlie is a bit like watching an episode of The Flintstones, where you know Fred will do something stupid, and all you can do is cringe. The plot threads also come together in a bizarrely tidy way at the end.I appreciate the writing, but this book just isn't a keeper for me.read more
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Usually, sequels are the less impressive of the two, however I enjoyed Anansi Boys much more than American Gods. I think it was the humor in it as I am a huge fan of comedy and Neil does it so well.read more
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This is one of my favourite books to come from Gaiman, although I've yet to read a work of his I haven't liked. This one, though, sucked me in and refused to let me run my errands.read more
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I really enjoyed this book, sometimes laughed out loud. I liked the link to the Anansi tales and Gaiman's dry sense of humor that comes out in his writing. I'm looking forward to reading more of his books.read more
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I'm a huge fan of neil gaiman, plus I love anancy stories, so I'm utterly biased here.read more
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a really interesting, different, intelligent book. this is my first foray into the world of neil gaiman and i'm hooked.read more
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A very grabbing and entertaining book that has many episodes of comic relief that leave one clutching their sides. Many times while reading this I laughed out loud, gaining many stares of disaproval from those near me.read more
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Fat Charlie is the son of Anansi - the spider god. Anansi is quick witted, well liked by some, hated by the other gods, and a jokester. Fat Charlie is confused and doesn't live up to who he is supposed to be. Upon the death of Anansi, Fat Charlie summons his brother Spider, and finds out who he really is. I have not fully made up my mind if I enjoyed this book or not. It was a quick read, and interesting plot. The mythology part was good. I didn't become invested in the characters and I think that is why I didn't throughly enjoy the book. 3 STARSread more
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Fat Charlie Nancy is just an fairly ordinary bloke, with run of the mill problems, such as how to get his fiancee, Rosie, to sleep with him before their wedding. That is until his father dies and he asks a spider to find his long lost brother. Then all hell breaks loose and Charlie learns that there is much more to life than he had, and in the process loses his embarrassment with himself and learns and that birds are not always nice. I love how Gaiman takes the ordinary world and makes it extraordinarily scary and funny all at the same time. He has a nice way of writing too. 'the beast made the noise of a cat being shampooed, a lonely wail of horror and outrage, of shame and defeat.' Wonderful.read more
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Wow. This book doesn't even rank in the bottom ten worst books ever. Its below that. Not quite as bad as Spider Legs, but still rather pitiful. The first chapter has so many confusing paragraphs, I had difficulty enjoying the book. The story could have been narrowed down to a short story without harm, because it would cut worthless author asides which threw me out of the story. I could not recommend this book to anyone else.read more
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one of my faves
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I moved on to this book immediately after finishing American Gods. If you haven't read American Gods, I recommend reading that book first. The two stories are not mutually exclusive but I feel Anansi Boys is more fun if you are already familiar with Gaiman's interpretation of Anansi.

This is a fast-paced read, sprinkled with clever humor and references to mythology, Anansi the Spider in particular. As with American Gods, Gaiman proves once again that ordinary fellows can be fascinating when they find themselves dealing with the supernatural and coming to terms with it. Look for a fun, entertaining trip when you start this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A real classic
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
this was a good book. the pacing of the book was a little wierd, it alternated from being really fast to really slow. the charachters were hit and miss. but it is entertaining, and some of the stuff in the book was very funny.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Audio Book. A modern fairy tale about two sons of Anansi who must reconcile their differences to face the common threat. The story is more non-fantasy as it focuses on character interaction and family relationships, although Gaiman does a great job of weaving the supernatural in. Overall I was a little dissapointed and expected more innovation from the unique concept. Gaiman also has some very clever wordings, but several characters seemed like mere plot devices. The reader was good, although it can get tiresome to listen to many takes on black British voices. As a previous reviewer notes, if you enjoy this book, definitely check out Christopher Moore. I have the same opinion that Moore is better at this style by far.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting and funny. Highly enjoyable
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked American Gods more, and I felt that this book dragged a bit.BUT, it was worth reading...
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Kept waiting for it to turn into a sequel to American Gods, but it never did. Which left me disappointed. Probably would have liked it better had I realized that going in.Oh well.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As I was reading Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys, I was inspired to write a few blogs in advance, something that hasn't happened before (at least not merely from reading a book--I've had several "genius" blog ideas in advance, some of which have made it live). And since I wasn't sure how long I was going to take to finish the novel, I jotted them down elsewhere and waited to see if they still had merit. I think they do. Here's the first of three installments, this one from when I was still in the first third of the book. Part II like my commas. I like them fluttering about the text, adding on little bits of information, inserting asides, tucking away last-minute thoughts into otherwise rather rambling sentences. When I edit, whether it's self editing as I write or editing a novel, a blog, or sometimes even an email, most of what I do is straighten sentences out, organize them, do the literary equivalent of straightening the tie against the collar of my sentences, if that makes sense to anyone but me. Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys is not doing me any favors either. If ever there were a novel written for lovers of commas and the interjections of rambling side-thoughts of a character scattered amidst the factual information being delivered by a sentence, this is the book. (Having never read another Gaiman novel before, I can't say if they're all like this. I have a feeling they're not, since the style so aptly fits the character.) Part II I can't decide if I like Neil Gaiman's style or not. Okay, that's not accurate. I like his style. It fits the character. What I really don't like is the main character. Fat Charlie is so weak, there is nothing to root for. Every chance he gets to redeem himself, to fight back, to take a stand, he wimps out. It's not a trait I like in a person or a character. I like to read books about characters I like, not characters I like to hate. I spend a lot of time with each book (especially now that I'm trying to slow down and study them a little, per Prose's comments). So reading about a character that I just plain don't like is like inviting people that I don't like to dinner. All the fun things, all the shared conversations, are drained dry, sucked of fun. It's not something I would do to myself in real life. And yet… Yet, I argued with myself every time I thought, "Let's just skim ahead and find out what happens, put this book aside, and go back to enjoying the rest of the books on my shelves." I couldn't make myself do it. I want to continue to read, if only, I decided, for one simple reason: Gaiman has no qualms about making his characters miserable. Not just making their lives miserable and yet having them buoyed by some inner strengths through the rough times. Nope. Not Gaiman. He leaves Fat Charlie to suffer, and suffer, and just when it couldn't—shouldn't—get worse, Gaiman adds a little more to Fat Charlie's load. As an author who cringes when putting my favorite characters through tough ordeals, it's a good lesson for me to watch a master perform. Books without conflicts are dull. Characters who have it easy are no fun. I understand this, but try spending a month or two with a person, and during that time wishing them ill will at every turn. It's hard. So I continued. Will I read another Gaiman novel? Not for a long time, if ever. Am I glad I did. Yes. Frustratingly, yes. Part III (This is from a few days after I finished the book, about ten days after I wrote Part II.) Did I like Anansi Boys when it’s all said and done? The fact that I’m still talking about it says a lot. Yes, I ended up liking it. I liked the character growth. Fat Charlie grew on me, as he was supposed to. I liked the fantastical elements interwoven. I liked that it got me out of my comfort zone. (I say this, having finished it and now being back within my comfort zone.) Am I ready to rush out an buy another Neil Gaiman book? Definitely not. Will I ever? Yes. Reading this book made it hard for me to find the next book to read. For me, that’s a good sign. It means I was so in an author’s world that I’m not ready to leave it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Modern Carribean folktale, fantasy. A lot of fun. I loved it enough to read it Again!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Neil Gaiman brilliantly weaves humor together with morbidity in this enjoyable story.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was an easy and enjoyable read that solidifies Gaiman's name as a storyteller. He uses Anansi tales from West African and Carribean folklore as a root, not a crutch for the story. Most characters were designed with a rough and tumble mix of flair and flaw that is appealing to readers, and typical Gaiman humor peppers the dialogue. However, perhaps because of the number of involved characters in a relatively short book, readers might not connect to the characters on the level they might have wished they could.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I remember Gaiman from comics and was excited to see he had moved to novels. Anansi Boys is no disappointment. I immediately liked Fat Charlie as an honest and defective main character and equally hated the antagonist, Grahame. Gaiman builds scenes that easily paint themselves in your mind and make the experience of reading almost surreal. I can gauge how much I like a book by the speed at which I read it and I savored each word. I was disappointed when it ended because the ride was over. On the other hand, I had a different experience with American Gods.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
For me, “Anansi Boys” was one third Douglas Adams, one third Robert Rankin, one third Jasper Fforde and one third Neil Gaiman. (I know, but it’s that kind of book.)There’s the “wacky things happen when you least expect it, but roll with it” aspect that I always enjoy. An ordinary bedroom in a London flat can suddenly seem the size of a football field with a different view out the window than what is really there, one person can be seen as a completely different person even to those who know him best, and there are gods walking the earth. Supernatural meeting the mundane with witty banter along the way.I certainly wouldn’t say this is one of my favorite books of this type – but it was an enjoyable read. I picked it up mostly because I recognized Gaiman’s name from Coraline which my kids saw and liked. Based on that frame of reference that I had, this book was NOTHING like that. Which is fine. Oh, but before I go further, I should mention that the main character’s name is Fat Charlie.“Fat Charlie tried to remember what people did in prison to pass the time, but all he could come up with was keeping secret diaries and hiding things in their bottoms. He had nothing to write on, and felt that a definite measure of how well one was getting on in life was not having to hide things in one’s bottom.”It’s an interesting story with colorful characters as Fat Charlie discovers the world behind the one he had been inhabiting all his life. He has a good set of eyes with which the reader can see this unusual world, and sometimes his vision provides the reader with more than one might expect.“Different creatures have different eyes. Human eyes (unlike, say, a cat’s eyes, or an octopus’s) are only made to see one version of reality at a time. Fat Charlie saw one thing with his eyes, and he saw something else with his mind, and in the gulf between the two things, madness waited. He could feel a wild panic welling up inside him, and he took a deep breath and held it in while his heart thudded against his ribcage. He forced himself to believe his eyes, not his mind.”Fat Charlie is the definition of everyman, plodding along through life until he is forced to learn more about his father and his newly discovered brother, Spider.“If he (Spider) had not been perfectly certain of his own sanity, certain to a degree that normally is found only in people who have concluded that they’re definitely Julius Caesar and have been sent to save the world, he might have thought he was going mad.”I guess, in the end, I enjoyed this book but didn’t love it. I liked Gaiman’s easy writing style and most of the supernatural goofiness and found several of the parts to be funny in a gentle way.“Charlie pushed his fedora back onto his head. Some hats can only be worn if you’re willing to be jaunty, to set them at an angle and to walk beneath them with a spring in your stride as if you’re only a step away from dancing. They demand a lot of you. This hat was one of those, and Charlie was up to it.”Charlie, who somewhere along the way, stopped being Fat Charlie and became a man of his own. With a jaunty hat.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked this book better than American Gods, although the subject is related, I preferred the smaller scale of Anansi Boys. It felt like American Gods tried to fit an enormous amount of material and territory into one story. This book feels more intimate and comfortable in scale and style, and I think it's a more engaging story.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Much better written than his earlier work. I really like him because of his obsession with gods. You can see why he was a comic book writer. He didn't explore Anansi's trickery enough, but I did like his ventures into folktale styles. I was not bored in the least.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I haven't read Neil gaiman in a while, and I was surprised at how much I noticed his writing style and technique this time. I think it detracted slightly from my enjoyment, as I found it hard to immerse myself in the story without going 'Ooh, isn't that an interesting way to do it?'. Having said that, it was an awesome story. he's one of those insanely talented writers that make you look bad.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great read! What a web Gaiman can weave with Spider and his brother. I will definitely read this one again.
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I don't read much fiction, and I have quite a phobia about spiders. I would have bet real money that I would never read - much less enjoy - a work of fiction with even the most tenuous connection to spiders. I bought Anansi Boys as a gift for my nephew, based on favorable reviews in LT. Didn't have time to subject it to my usual 50-page test because Powell's was closing, but I thought I should at least preview it, to make sure it wasn't totally unsuitable. When I got it home, I carefully set aside the dust jacket, so I wouldn't mess it up (and so I wouldn't have to touch the drawing of a cobweb) and began to read. Instead of stopping at 50 pages, I read through the entire book in one weekend. This is even more unusual than reading fiction about spiders - I always have several books in progress, and usually read only a chapter before switching to something else. I did have two bad moments, when I turned a page and found a huge drawing of a spider. I barely managed to refrain from throwing the book across the room. Aside from that, this book was quite enjoyable. I will probably read another by Mr. Gaiman sometime - as long as spiders are not involved.
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This was lovely and vivid and fun--a wonderful book to be the last book of the summer (I start my PhD orientation tomorrow!). I'd describe it as something like Gaiman's [Neverwhere], but with a heavy touch of Christopher Moore-like humor thrown in. It took a bit to pull me in, but did sooner than later, and then kept me hooked. The world was wonderful, as it always is with Gaiman, and the characters unbelievably realistic for how fantastical they were. Much fun, and recommended. (One Warning: You'll finish this book desperately yearning for a quick jaunt to the caribbean.)
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I read American Gods a few years ago and found the concept interesting, but never connected to the characters. I was told at the time, Anansi Boys was better.Yes and no.Gaiman is a brilliant writer, no question, but for several reasons this book didn't connect for me. The characters are fully realized, yet the main characters--Fat Charlie and Spider--are rather unlikeable. Fat Charlie is a hapless everyman, and Spider is every bit a trickster god's son. Following Fat Charlie is a bit like watching an episode of The Flintstones, where you know Fred will do something stupid, and all you can do is cringe. The plot threads also come together in a bizarrely tidy way at the end.I appreciate the writing, but this book just isn't a keeper for me.
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Usually, sequels are the less impressive of the two, however I enjoyed Anansi Boys much more than American Gods. I think it was the humor in it as I am a huge fan of comedy and Neil does it so well.
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This is one of my favourite books to come from Gaiman, although I've yet to read a work of his I haven't liked. This one, though, sucked me in and refused to let me run my errands.
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I really enjoyed this book, sometimes laughed out loud. I liked the link to the Anansi tales and Gaiman's dry sense of humor that comes out in his writing. I'm looking forward to reading more of his books.
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I'm a huge fan of neil gaiman, plus I love anancy stories, so I'm utterly biased here.
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a really interesting, different, intelligent book. this is my first foray into the world of neil gaiman and i'm hooked.
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A very grabbing and entertaining book that has many episodes of comic relief that leave one clutching their sides. Many times while reading this I laughed out loud, gaining many stares of disaproval from those near me.
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Fat Charlie is the son of Anansi - the spider god. Anansi is quick witted, well liked by some, hated by the other gods, and a jokester. Fat Charlie is confused and doesn't live up to who he is supposed to be. Upon the death of Anansi, Fat Charlie summons his brother Spider, and finds out who he really is. I have not fully made up my mind if I enjoyed this book or not. It was a quick read, and interesting plot. The mythology part was good. I didn't become invested in the characters and I think that is why I didn't throughly enjoy the book. 3 STARS
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Fat Charlie Nancy is just an fairly ordinary bloke, with run of the mill problems, such as how to get his fiancee, Rosie, to sleep with him before their wedding. That is until his father dies and he asks a spider to find his long lost brother. Then all hell breaks loose and Charlie learns that there is much more to life than he had, and in the process loses his embarrassment with himself and learns and that birds are not always nice. I love how Gaiman takes the ordinary world and makes it extraordinarily scary and funny all at the same time. He has a nice way of writing too. 'the beast made the noise of a cat being shampooed, a lonely wail of horror and outrage, of shame and defeat.' Wonderful.
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Wow. This book doesn't even rank in the bottom ten worst books ever. Its below that. Not quite as bad as Spider Legs, but still rather pitiful. The first chapter has so many confusing paragraphs, I had difficulty enjoying the book. The story could have been narrowed down to a short story without harm, because it would cut worthless author asides which threw me out of the story. I could not recommend this book to anyone else.
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