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From the Publisher

For lovers of these beautiful little feats of engineering ..........
This is an inexpensive little guide intended for those starting to collect powder compacts. It gives general information on collecting and caring for compacts and features colour pictures, rarity indication and details of around 300 different powder compacts, carryalls and nécessaires from the early 1900’s up to the present day.

Published: Caroline Y Preston on
ISBN: 9781310038099
List price: $2.99
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