Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Here's looking at you, Cathy   Cathy's pretty and posh, Heathcliff's a moody brooding bastard. Heartbreak, alcoholism, and plenty of illegitimate kids—it's a perfect Northern England drama.
Published: Oldcastle Books an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781843441359
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Wuthering Heights
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Packed with passion, ghosts, bitter revenge, contrasting households and contrasting generations. Heathcliffe is a hero and a villain both. What a great gothic tale.more
Slowly, I’m working my way through a list of classics that I have always wanted to read. “Wuthering Heights” by Emily Bronte was next on the list. I knew that it was a story of unrequited love, and I was curious to see how her work would compare to her sister’s. Charlotte Bronte’s “Jane Eyre” is one of my favorites. I didn’t know, however, that the main characters would have the emotional maturity of two-year-olds. Maybe I have been reading far too many young adult novels because I thought “Wuthering Heights” would contain characters that I would, maybe not relate to, but at least latch onto and then want to follow their plight to a satisfying conclusion. Heathcliff, however, is purely a villain with no redeeming qualities and Catherine a spoiled brat. This was disappointing because I wanted to immerse myself in the novel and get lost in their relationship. Instead, I followed the train wreck that they created and the ripple effects impacting the people around them, including their children. It’s not often that a novel features the “bad guys” as protagonists and the secondary characters as the normal people. This interesting twist, the excellent quality of writing, and the fact that I can’t stop thinking about the story made the novel worth reading.more
I thought this book would be way better because of all the hype surrounding it. I thought it was rather impersonal, and the characters were never really explained. The story seemed to have no point. I did read this 5 years ago, so maybe I'd understand it better if I read it again.more
This year I re-read "Jane Eyre," and endeavored to read the books her sisters wrote. Recently, planning to read the first novel by Daphne Du Maurier, I read that it was a kind of homage to "Wuthering Heights," and so I set out to read it before the Du Maurier novel.

What an intensely gloomy and miserable book! I don't think that the malformation of Heathcliff's character is ever really explained, nor is his love/hate relationship with Catherine after her marriage. How can he think that torturing the offspring of his enemies is anything other than sadism? How come I've heard him referred to as a romantic character?

This book probably paints a truer picture of the period than do others, but it's hard for me to understand how it's come to be regarded as Great Literature.more
Nearly every character in this book is horrible and by the time I finished reading the book I was hate-reading in order to get finished. The writing was excellent, and I'm glad the end was the way it was, but dear lord - what horrible people.more
A truly miserable story, but with very beautiful writing. There's no denying that almost everyone in this book suffers from some mental problems, but it's hard not to get pulled into the story all the same.more
> In Lord John and the Private Matter, Lord John opines that honour sacrificed on the altar of love renders the love dishonourable and the lesser of pure lust. Heathcliff’s love for Catherine is an example of just such dishonourable love and is hardly the stuff of any romantic sensibility nor of the philosophical bent of Nietschze (“Beyond good and evil there is love.”) Heathcliff’s feeling for Catherine is egocentric, destructive and, a fearful thing not unlike the wuthering moors. Like the twisted tangles of brush that somehow manage to survive on the moors, the people that come into contact with Heathcliff are bowed and bent under the sheer force of his will, passion and temper. The idea of such an unrelenting, aggressive and unsparing devotion is both shocking and frightening. Beyond the linear narrative, this novel merits re-examination (re-reading) for its dense language, its allegorical associations and, the ideas about human nature itself.more
Always wondered if I'd enjoy Wuthering Heights. I'm still wondering. Any engagement I might have had was obliterated by the narrator on the Trout Lake Media audiobook version . The toned-down American accent she used for the more gentrified characters is bearable – but judging by her attempts at a Yorkshire accent, the book is actually set somewhere in the outer Hebrides. She also has A TENDENCY TO SHOUT, which makes the recording actively uncomfortable to listen to. I enjoyed Brontë's gruesome Gothic manner when I could focus on it – sadly, I can't face reading or listening through again. I'll find a movie version to make sense of it all.more
Yes, it's melodramatic. Yes, the narration can be confusing if you don't pay much attention (which is why I couldn't understand it the first time I read it). And yes, Catherine and Heathcliff are two quite unlikable characters, it astonishes me that two selfish people can find "true love", and what's more, they get a twisted but happy ending.

But, man, I can proudly say that Wuthering Heights is a great novel. The greatest? No. But definitely high up there. Maybe along with Romeo and Juliet, because it reminded me of my reading experience with this book. Both books are misunderstood/have plenty of misconceptions, and even I was victim to their misconceptions. Both have unlikable characters who get their "happy ending" in the afterlife, and people either hate em or love em. Both I really liked despite my previous prejudice towards these books. And both I really respect for the way they were written. I just frickin love books with a way with words. (see added quotes). I may be a weirdo who likes reading the classics, but for sure, I do not praise all of them. Or maybe it's because I'm so weird that I like this book. It does have some weird development between the cousins Hareton and Catherine Jr. And it's different because the characters are anti-heroes.

Weirdness Well-written = Must be my cup of tea. lol


What I really loved most was these characters' passion. Being a phlegmatic person, I was very much entertained by these people whose natures are nothing like mine. They love and hate violently. They can like a person instantly, and in just a few hours, after a slight insult, hate them (in Catherine Jr's instance). And all this passion, from a practically sheltered Emily Bronte. Charlotte Bronte said something about her sister's writing: that it was raw, with a child's innocence (not her exact words). Truly, Wuthering Heights is an unforgettable novel. I'm glad I read it again as an adult, when I can appreciate it.

*4.5 stars
more
I still consider this one of my favorite books, possibly of all time, and that just further solidifies with each reread. One of the easier 'classic' novels to read, at least in my opinion. Cathy Heathcliff are my model couple for crazy love, and then Cathy 2.0 Hareton are a prime example of opposites attracting. Ahhhh I seriously just love this dark, twisted little book, plain and simple.more
I loved and hated this book. Catherine almost drove me insane, but I loved the concept of the love she and Heathcliffe shared. I would have enjoyed it more if I'd not been reading it for school.more
This is my second time reading Wuthering Heights, and it is undeniably a Great Literary Work (i.e., fun to analyze.) I gave it four stars because it was an interesting read and because I would feel guilty otherwise.

Nevertheless, something still doesn't click with me and Wuthering Heights. It's a novel that is supremely disinterested in my approval, which is cool, but not very satisfying from a readerly point-of-view. I am puzzled by its characters, and intrigued by them, but at the end of the day I cannot persuade myself to care about them very much.

It's still a neat novel - just not one that rests in the deepest cockles of my heart. Oh well.

(Also, the Broadview Edition is *terrible* - all of the footnotes assume this really ridiculous narrow historical reading of the novel, and let you know every time Emily Bronte uses a word that Shakespeare used in Othello in a completely different context. Because OBVIOUSLY she did that on purpose.)more
One time I almost physically fought someone over whether the love in this book is something to emulate. (It's not!) Probably one of the best learning moments for me was when I tried to write a paper in college saying this book had a happy resolution, and my teacher took me aside and told me you don't have to write things that you don't believe in papers. Thank you, DK!more
Wuthering Heights is known as a gothic romance. I do not consider it a romantic story. It is dark, and "disagreeable", and utterly fascinating. It is difficult to feel sympathy for any of the characters, yet the story stays in your mind long after you finish it. What was this character's motivation? Why did that happen? What if.... Could it be.... One is compelled to reflect on human nature and the author's goals in telling the story.more
"Wuthering Heights" is a writer's novel. The twists and turns of its frame narrative style, along with the reincarnation of Heathcliff's love and vengeance on so many different (but similarly named) instantiations of their initial targets, leave the reader constantly wondering who is talking, who is being talked about, and why more of the characters don't just speak for themselves. In a masterful way, this confusion calls out the subjugation inherent in Brontë's own society. The author shrieks back at a world that relegated women to subservience, and that on occasion dismissed her own and her sister Anne's writing as likely the product of their sister Charlotte's imagination, by voicing the eternity of her characters' hearts through the words of others. This, metaphorically, is what her writing did for her, and what all great writing does for its author. On first reading, the narrative structure consumed all of my attention, but left me entranced by its power. On second reading, ten years later, I vowed to focus on the characterisation of the novel and discovered some of the most unlikeable and least relatable personalities that literature has ever produced. This is not a book club read for gabbing with your girlfriends, but a manifesto on the power of words to haunt the minds of generations. I linger on Brontë's writing, and wonder how any one could ever imagine quiet slumbers for an author who continues to speak so powerfully today.The Barnes and Noble edition of this book contains a selection of famous quotations, a timeline of Brontë's life, an introduction by Daphne Merkin, a note on the text and dialect, a genealogical chart of the characters, the original biography of Ellis and Acton Bell and the editor's preface to the 1850 edition of the book written by Currer Bell (Charlotte Brontë), footnotes (of dialect and translation) and endnotes, an exploration of works inspired by the novel, a set of critical opinions and questions for the reader, and a suggested bibliography for further reading.more
A most unusual novel. Dark tale of wretched and unlikable characters, of a tormented and bold - yet unable to change his fate subjected to his time (the Victorian England) - tragic soul and his other-worldly passionate and dark love relationship, with vengeful, selfish or pathetic actions, obsessions and great tragedy, which is irritating and painful while reading; but somehow turns into a fluffy(?!), moderately sunny and comforting ending.

Not quite pleasant and easy to read but definitely one of the most thought-provoking after: it is compelled to read it more than once.

No. It's not about love. And it certainly is not a romance! Cathy and Heathcliff's relationship is much more complicated, messy and profound than a simple romantic love.

On another note, has anyone been "vexed" by the narrative of this story as I was? The choice of the narrator has left much to be desired, too ambiguous and unrealiable to my liking, which, in a positive way, gives the readers the freedom to interpret as well, obviously.more
I refuse to review this title, but I can say its one of my favorites and not just because of twisted dark romance, but the sheer elegance of the writing and the topic which was shocking for the time period.more
Unforgettable love story. Haunting, sad, beautiful. A timeless classic.more
This book is beautiful, ugly, and upsetting. It's probably best to read over a rainy weekend with lots of comfort food... I'm not usually a fan of historical romances, especially in this time period, but Wuthering Heights is the exception. This is no prim and proper story about high society goings-on; these characters are broken, mistakes are made, and pride and anger really do have consequences. She chooses society over love (or perhaps over her own nature); he chooses revenge and pride. Both suffer for it.more
Reading the book a year after my pilgrimage to Haworth last year reminded me of the bleak Yorkshire landscape that drives sheep into suicide. As Juliet Barker so memorably noted in her stellar Brontë biography, the sisters would be quickly "plowed under" by the unhealthy living conditions. The protagonists of this novel suffer from the same condition. Marriage and death are its two constants which occur, like in a soap opera, amidst a tiny cast who fall for and over each other.Large doses of misery and small potions of happiness are in store for the occupants of Wuthering Heights and the Grange. To me, their hate is understandable, the cast featuring singularly obnoxious personae. The love stories I found less believable in their almost Stockholm syndrome like variant. The 2012 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded for "the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design". The Wuthering Heights marriage market clears fast thanks to the paucity of contestants, happiness does not ensue.A remarkable aspect of the novel are the stark gender contrasts. While the women are mostly passive-aggressive, the men are divided into extremely violent and meek types. There is not much space for the normal in the Yorkshire moors.more
One of the most incredible, yet disturbing novels of the 19th century. What was unique for it's time is now the Lifetime Movie Network, however, no story or movie of such horrid characters will ever match the beauty and horror of Emily's Wuthering Heights.In a novel full of rich, truistic characters that show the realities of humanity all too well, the only ones who could be even close to lovable are the young Hareton and Cathy along with the all-knowing narrator, Nelly Dean. Even the listener of her tale, Mr. Lockwood shows little valor in his enlightenment to Heathcliff's character by leaving the youths to their desolation under his rule. This novel has the brilliant underlying moral that revenge and hatred can only make your life a living hell. It also shows the destruction that can be brought on by obsessive, selfish love.Emily Bronte's novel also brings to light the ever controversial argument of Nature vs. Nature. Would Heathcliff, Linton, Catherine, and Hindley have different temperaments and fates if they had been exposed to better environments? Especially in the case of Linton who was a sweet lad until exposed to his father and he turned selfish and vile.A wonderful, brilliant, original, classic that is one of those rare novels I can see myself re-reading many times.more
Can you believe this? Hot, humid summer days and I'm reading Wuthering Heights? It's true. Just finished yesterday afternoon. I'm very slowly getting through some of the classic novels I've wanted to read for most of my life, and for the most part I'm enjoying them.Wuthering Heights, though, is a strange book with very strange characters. I had to keep reminding myself when this was written because I just wanted to slap many of the characters, especially the two Catherines for being so headstrong and selfish. As for Heathcliff's meanness and horrid personality, I still really don't understand fully, although his childhood explains a lot.This is a depressing tale of the families who live near each other at Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. They vie with each other for the two Catherines and everyone is unhappy. Wuthering Heights is dirty with vile inhabitants, Thrushcross Grange clean and ultra respectable. One family rich, the other poor; one educated, the other not. Complete opposites, and Heathcliff is determined to have everything.This was Emily Bronte's only novel, and I think we should be thankful for that. I'll admit I was interested enough in the outcome to keep reading right to the end, but I'm left with a feeling of having wasted my time. Oh well, at least I can say I read it, can't I?more
The characters in Emily Brontë’s novel are so extreme, so given over to their passions, so driven and wilful that you will, certainly, want to pull your own hair out. From the dissipated yet cruel Hindley, to the emotionally divided and divisive Cathy, to the mindlessly foolish Isabella, and her ineffectual brother, Edgar, to the stunted, brutish Hareton, it is a cavalcade of distasteful, even monstrous, types. But none compare to the fiendish Heathcliff himself, whose unrelenting vengeful monomania brings ruin upon them all. How Heathcliff’s perverse passion for Catherine came to represent any sort of ideal of romantic devotion in the many years subsequent to the novel’s publication is a mystery to me.If possible, it might be best to set aside the principal characters and their extreme emotions and actions, and turn instead to the descriptive prose with which Emily Brontë renders the wild moors, the relentless inclement weather, and the brief wonder of spring or a sunny summer day. Even more intriguing is the bracketed narrative technique, initiated by the loquaciously risible Mr. Lockwood and then, more prosaically, carried forward by Ellen Dean. That Ellen Dean at one point encourages Mr. Lockwood to pursue a possible marriage with the younger Catherine deliciously risks the confusion of narrative and plot, and Mr. Lockwood does well to get himself as far away from Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights as possible. His return later in the year rightly heralds the wrapping up of loose ends and the natural dénouement of the tale.Wuthering Heights, even today, seems so singular, so extreme that, if you still have hair at the end of it, you might wish to set it on its own shelf in your library, isolated and incomparable. A curious, dark masterpiece recommended only for the brave of heart.more
Piecing my way through the narrative fog of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights with its many layers of narrators, I was reminded of the found footage genre of films, in which the viewer’s entire understanding of the story is whatever is visually made apparent to them through the first person gaze of the whoever’s holding the camera in the fictional world and then the film’s editor, a figure who sits between that world and our reality. Everything we know about the love story is filtered through the recollections of Lockwood and Nelly and others, characters who Bronte employs to imply that Heathcliffe and Cathy and their decedents exist in a subjectively cruel, sadistic place cut off from a more benign reality. All are apparently reliable narrators, but throughout I couldn’t help a nagging suspicion, and that like The Blair Witch Project et al, there are multiple layers of fiction at play.more
One of the most revered classic novels. A true dark romance full of love, daring and sensuality. We would all like to be loved and to love another with this intensity.more
I have no idea how this is a love story. Both main characters are arrogant, selfish people and the only decent person in the book is treated like dirt. Horrible book.more
Read all 290 reviews

Reviews

Packed with passion, ghosts, bitter revenge, contrasting households and contrasting generations. Heathcliffe is a hero and a villain both. What a great gothic tale.more
Slowly, I’m working my way through a list of classics that I have always wanted to read. “Wuthering Heights” by Emily Bronte was next on the list. I knew that it was a story of unrequited love, and I was curious to see how her work would compare to her sister’s. Charlotte Bronte’s “Jane Eyre” is one of my favorites. I didn’t know, however, that the main characters would have the emotional maturity of two-year-olds. Maybe I have been reading far too many young adult novels because I thought “Wuthering Heights” would contain characters that I would, maybe not relate to, but at least latch onto and then want to follow their plight to a satisfying conclusion. Heathcliff, however, is purely a villain with no redeeming qualities and Catherine a spoiled brat. This was disappointing because I wanted to immerse myself in the novel and get lost in their relationship. Instead, I followed the train wreck that they created and the ripple effects impacting the people around them, including their children. It’s not often that a novel features the “bad guys” as protagonists and the secondary characters as the normal people. This interesting twist, the excellent quality of writing, and the fact that I can’t stop thinking about the story made the novel worth reading.more
I thought this book would be way better because of all the hype surrounding it. I thought it was rather impersonal, and the characters were never really explained. The story seemed to have no point. I did read this 5 years ago, so maybe I'd understand it better if I read it again.more
This year I re-read "Jane Eyre," and endeavored to read the books her sisters wrote. Recently, planning to read the first novel by Daphne Du Maurier, I read that it was a kind of homage to "Wuthering Heights," and so I set out to read it before the Du Maurier novel.

What an intensely gloomy and miserable book! I don't think that the malformation of Heathcliff's character is ever really explained, nor is his love/hate relationship with Catherine after her marriage. How can he think that torturing the offspring of his enemies is anything other than sadism? How come I've heard him referred to as a romantic character?

This book probably paints a truer picture of the period than do others, but it's hard for me to understand how it's come to be regarded as Great Literature.more
Nearly every character in this book is horrible and by the time I finished reading the book I was hate-reading in order to get finished. The writing was excellent, and I'm glad the end was the way it was, but dear lord - what horrible people.more
A truly miserable story, but with very beautiful writing. There's no denying that almost everyone in this book suffers from some mental problems, but it's hard not to get pulled into the story all the same.more
> In Lord John and the Private Matter, Lord John opines that honour sacrificed on the altar of love renders the love dishonourable and the lesser of pure lust. Heathcliff’s love for Catherine is an example of just such dishonourable love and is hardly the stuff of any romantic sensibility nor of the philosophical bent of Nietschze (“Beyond good and evil there is love.”) Heathcliff’s feeling for Catherine is egocentric, destructive and, a fearful thing not unlike the wuthering moors. Like the twisted tangles of brush that somehow manage to survive on the moors, the people that come into contact with Heathcliff are bowed and bent under the sheer force of his will, passion and temper. The idea of such an unrelenting, aggressive and unsparing devotion is both shocking and frightening. Beyond the linear narrative, this novel merits re-examination (re-reading) for its dense language, its allegorical associations and, the ideas about human nature itself.more
Always wondered if I'd enjoy Wuthering Heights. I'm still wondering. Any engagement I might have had was obliterated by the narrator on the Trout Lake Media audiobook version . The toned-down American accent she used for the more gentrified characters is bearable – but judging by her attempts at a Yorkshire accent, the book is actually set somewhere in the outer Hebrides. She also has A TENDENCY TO SHOUT, which makes the recording actively uncomfortable to listen to. I enjoyed Brontë's gruesome Gothic manner when I could focus on it – sadly, I can't face reading or listening through again. I'll find a movie version to make sense of it all.more
Yes, it's melodramatic. Yes, the narration can be confusing if you don't pay much attention (which is why I couldn't understand it the first time I read it). And yes, Catherine and Heathcliff are two quite unlikable characters, it astonishes me that two selfish people can find "true love", and what's more, they get a twisted but happy ending.

But, man, I can proudly say that Wuthering Heights is a great novel. The greatest? No. But definitely high up there. Maybe along with Romeo and Juliet, because it reminded me of my reading experience with this book. Both books are misunderstood/have plenty of misconceptions, and even I was victim to their misconceptions. Both have unlikable characters who get their "happy ending" in the afterlife, and people either hate em or love em. Both I really liked despite my previous prejudice towards these books. And both I really respect for the way they were written. I just frickin love books with a way with words. (see added quotes). I may be a weirdo who likes reading the classics, but for sure, I do not praise all of them. Or maybe it's because I'm so weird that I like this book. It does have some weird development between the cousins Hareton and Catherine Jr. And it's different because the characters are anti-heroes.

Weirdness Well-written = Must be my cup of tea. lol


What I really loved most was these characters' passion. Being a phlegmatic person, I was very much entertained by these people whose natures are nothing like mine. They love and hate violently. They can like a person instantly, and in just a few hours, after a slight insult, hate them (in Catherine Jr's instance). And all this passion, from a practically sheltered Emily Bronte. Charlotte Bronte said something about her sister's writing: that it was raw, with a child's innocence (not her exact words). Truly, Wuthering Heights is an unforgettable novel. I'm glad I read it again as an adult, when I can appreciate it.

*4.5 stars
more
I still consider this one of my favorite books, possibly of all time, and that just further solidifies with each reread. One of the easier 'classic' novels to read, at least in my opinion. Cathy Heathcliff are my model couple for crazy love, and then Cathy 2.0 Hareton are a prime example of opposites attracting. Ahhhh I seriously just love this dark, twisted little book, plain and simple.more
I loved and hated this book. Catherine almost drove me insane, but I loved the concept of the love she and Heathcliffe shared. I would have enjoyed it more if I'd not been reading it for school.more
This is my second time reading Wuthering Heights, and it is undeniably a Great Literary Work (i.e., fun to analyze.) I gave it four stars because it was an interesting read and because I would feel guilty otherwise.

Nevertheless, something still doesn't click with me and Wuthering Heights. It's a novel that is supremely disinterested in my approval, which is cool, but not very satisfying from a readerly point-of-view. I am puzzled by its characters, and intrigued by them, but at the end of the day I cannot persuade myself to care about them very much.

It's still a neat novel - just not one that rests in the deepest cockles of my heart. Oh well.

(Also, the Broadview Edition is *terrible* - all of the footnotes assume this really ridiculous narrow historical reading of the novel, and let you know every time Emily Bronte uses a word that Shakespeare used in Othello in a completely different context. Because OBVIOUSLY she did that on purpose.)more
One time I almost physically fought someone over whether the love in this book is something to emulate. (It's not!) Probably one of the best learning moments for me was when I tried to write a paper in college saying this book had a happy resolution, and my teacher took me aside and told me you don't have to write things that you don't believe in papers. Thank you, DK!more
Wuthering Heights is known as a gothic romance. I do not consider it a romantic story. It is dark, and "disagreeable", and utterly fascinating. It is difficult to feel sympathy for any of the characters, yet the story stays in your mind long after you finish it. What was this character's motivation? Why did that happen? What if.... Could it be.... One is compelled to reflect on human nature and the author's goals in telling the story.more
"Wuthering Heights" is a writer's novel. The twists and turns of its frame narrative style, along with the reincarnation of Heathcliff's love and vengeance on so many different (but similarly named) instantiations of their initial targets, leave the reader constantly wondering who is talking, who is being talked about, and why more of the characters don't just speak for themselves. In a masterful way, this confusion calls out the subjugation inherent in Brontë's own society. The author shrieks back at a world that relegated women to subservience, and that on occasion dismissed her own and her sister Anne's writing as likely the product of their sister Charlotte's imagination, by voicing the eternity of her characters' hearts through the words of others. This, metaphorically, is what her writing did for her, and what all great writing does for its author. On first reading, the narrative structure consumed all of my attention, but left me entranced by its power. On second reading, ten years later, I vowed to focus on the characterisation of the novel and discovered some of the most unlikeable and least relatable personalities that literature has ever produced. This is not a book club read for gabbing with your girlfriends, but a manifesto on the power of words to haunt the minds of generations. I linger on Brontë's writing, and wonder how any one could ever imagine quiet slumbers for an author who continues to speak so powerfully today.The Barnes and Noble edition of this book contains a selection of famous quotations, a timeline of Brontë's life, an introduction by Daphne Merkin, a note on the text and dialect, a genealogical chart of the characters, the original biography of Ellis and Acton Bell and the editor's preface to the 1850 edition of the book written by Currer Bell (Charlotte Brontë), footnotes (of dialect and translation) and endnotes, an exploration of works inspired by the novel, a set of critical opinions and questions for the reader, and a suggested bibliography for further reading.more
A most unusual novel. Dark tale of wretched and unlikable characters, of a tormented and bold - yet unable to change his fate subjected to his time (the Victorian England) - tragic soul and his other-worldly passionate and dark love relationship, with vengeful, selfish or pathetic actions, obsessions and great tragedy, which is irritating and painful while reading; but somehow turns into a fluffy(?!), moderately sunny and comforting ending.

Not quite pleasant and easy to read but definitely one of the most thought-provoking after: it is compelled to read it more than once.

No. It's not about love. And it certainly is not a romance! Cathy and Heathcliff's relationship is much more complicated, messy and profound than a simple romantic love.

On another note, has anyone been "vexed" by the narrative of this story as I was? The choice of the narrator has left much to be desired, too ambiguous and unrealiable to my liking, which, in a positive way, gives the readers the freedom to interpret as well, obviously.more
I refuse to review this title, but I can say its one of my favorites and not just because of twisted dark romance, but the sheer elegance of the writing and the topic which was shocking for the time period.more
Unforgettable love story. Haunting, sad, beautiful. A timeless classic.more
This book is beautiful, ugly, and upsetting. It's probably best to read over a rainy weekend with lots of comfort food... I'm not usually a fan of historical romances, especially in this time period, but Wuthering Heights is the exception. This is no prim and proper story about high society goings-on; these characters are broken, mistakes are made, and pride and anger really do have consequences. She chooses society over love (or perhaps over her own nature); he chooses revenge and pride. Both suffer for it.more
Reading the book a year after my pilgrimage to Haworth last year reminded me of the bleak Yorkshire landscape that drives sheep into suicide. As Juliet Barker so memorably noted in her stellar Brontë biography, the sisters would be quickly "plowed under" by the unhealthy living conditions. The protagonists of this novel suffer from the same condition. Marriage and death are its two constants which occur, like in a soap opera, amidst a tiny cast who fall for and over each other.Large doses of misery and small potions of happiness are in store for the occupants of Wuthering Heights and the Grange. To me, their hate is understandable, the cast featuring singularly obnoxious personae. The love stories I found less believable in their almost Stockholm syndrome like variant. The 2012 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded for "the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design". The Wuthering Heights marriage market clears fast thanks to the paucity of contestants, happiness does not ensue.A remarkable aspect of the novel are the stark gender contrasts. While the women are mostly passive-aggressive, the men are divided into extremely violent and meek types. There is not much space for the normal in the Yorkshire moors.more
One of the most incredible, yet disturbing novels of the 19th century. What was unique for it's time is now the Lifetime Movie Network, however, no story or movie of such horrid characters will ever match the beauty and horror of Emily's Wuthering Heights.In a novel full of rich, truistic characters that show the realities of humanity all too well, the only ones who could be even close to lovable are the young Hareton and Cathy along with the all-knowing narrator, Nelly Dean. Even the listener of her tale, Mr. Lockwood shows little valor in his enlightenment to Heathcliff's character by leaving the youths to their desolation under his rule. This novel has the brilliant underlying moral that revenge and hatred can only make your life a living hell. It also shows the destruction that can be brought on by obsessive, selfish love.Emily Bronte's novel also brings to light the ever controversial argument of Nature vs. Nature. Would Heathcliff, Linton, Catherine, and Hindley have different temperaments and fates if they had been exposed to better environments? Especially in the case of Linton who was a sweet lad until exposed to his father and he turned selfish and vile.A wonderful, brilliant, original, classic that is one of those rare novels I can see myself re-reading many times.more
Can you believe this? Hot, humid summer days and I'm reading Wuthering Heights? It's true. Just finished yesterday afternoon. I'm very slowly getting through some of the classic novels I've wanted to read for most of my life, and for the most part I'm enjoying them.Wuthering Heights, though, is a strange book with very strange characters. I had to keep reminding myself when this was written because I just wanted to slap many of the characters, especially the two Catherines for being so headstrong and selfish. As for Heathcliff's meanness and horrid personality, I still really don't understand fully, although his childhood explains a lot.This is a depressing tale of the families who live near each other at Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. They vie with each other for the two Catherines and everyone is unhappy. Wuthering Heights is dirty with vile inhabitants, Thrushcross Grange clean and ultra respectable. One family rich, the other poor; one educated, the other not. Complete opposites, and Heathcliff is determined to have everything.This was Emily Bronte's only novel, and I think we should be thankful for that. I'll admit I was interested enough in the outcome to keep reading right to the end, but I'm left with a feeling of having wasted my time. Oh well, at least I can say I read it, can't I?more
The characters in Emily Brontë’s novel are so extreme, so given over to their passions, so driven and wilful that you will, certainly, want to pull your own hair out. From the dissipated yet cruel Hindley, to the emotionally divided and divisive Cathy, to the mindlessly foolish Isabella, and her ineffectual brother, Edgar, to the stunted, brutish Hareton, it is a cavalcade of distasteful, even monstrous, types. But none compare to the fiendish Heathcliff himself, whose unrelenting vengeful monomania brings ruin upon them all. How Heathcliff’s perverse passion for Catherine came to represent any sort of ideal of romantic devotion in the many years subsequent to the novel’s publication is a mystery to me.If possible, it might be best to set aside the principal characters and their extreme emotions and actions, and turn instead to the descriptive prose with which Emily Brontë renders the wild moors, the relentless inclement weather, and the brief wonder of spring or a sunny summer day. Even more intriguing is the bracketed narrative technique, initiated by the loquaciously risible Mr. Lockwood and then, more prosaically, carried forward by Ellen Dean. That Ellen Dean at one point encourages Mr. Lockwood to pursue a possible marriage with the younger Catherine deliciously risks the confusion of narrative and plot, and Mr. Lockwood does well to get himself as far away from Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights as possible. His return later in the year rightly heralds the wrapping up of loose ends and the natural dénouement of the tale.Wuthering Heights, even today, seems so singular, so extreme that, if you still have hair at the end of it, you might wish to set it on its own shelf in your library, isolated and incomparable. A curious, dark masterpiece recommended only for the brave of heart.more
Piecing my way through the narrative fog of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights with its many layers of narrators, I was reminded of the found footage genre of films, in which the viewer’s entire understanding of the story is whatever is visually made apparent to them through the first person gaze of the whoever’s holding the camera in the fictional world and then the film’s editor, a figure who sits between that world and our reality. Everything we know about the love story is filtered through the recollections of Lockwood and Nelly and others, characters who Bronte employs to imply that Heathcliffe and Cathy and their decedents exist in a subjectively cruel, sadistic place cut off from a more benign reality. All are apparently reliable narrators, but throughout I couldn’t help a nagging suspicion, and that like The Blair Witch Project et al, there are multiple layers of fiction at play.more
One of the most revered classic novels. A true dark romance full of love, daring and sensuality. We would all like to be loved and to love another with this intensity.more
I have no idea how this is a love story. Both main characters are arrogant, selfish people and the only decent person in the book is treated like dirt. Horrible book.more
Load more
scribd