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Editor’s Note

“Devastating Love Triangle...”

The inner lives of the people at the heart of this devastating love triangle are rendered achingly real in astonishingly rich prose. This is a masterpiece, a personal & powerful story of redemption and loss.
Justin K.
Scribd Editor
The acclaimed classic about one fatal day in a small Mexican town, hailed by the Modern Library as one of the one hundred best English novels of the twentieth century
Former British consul Geoffrey Firmin lives alone with his demons in the shadow of two active volcanoes in South Central Mexico. Gripped by alcoholism, Geoffrey makes one last effort to salvage his crumbling life on the day that his ex-wife, Yvonne, arrives in town. It’s the Day of the Dead, 1938. The couple wants to revive their marriage and undo the wrongs of their past, but they soon realize that they’ve stumbled into the wrong place and time, where not only Geoffrey and Yvonne, but the world itself is on the edge of Armageddon.   Hailed by the New York Times as “one of the towering novels of [the twentieth] century,” Under the Volcano stands as an iconic and richly drawn example of the modern novel at its most lyrical.

Topics: Mexico, 1930s, Death, Adultery, Alcoholism, Made into a Movie, Modernism, Psychological, Poetic, Allegorical, 20th Century, British Author, Dark, and Divorce

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Nov 6, 2012
ISBN: 9781453286296
List price: $9.99
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The Consul, of a mexican province reunites with his wife on teh Day of teh Dead festival. Teh story is mainly told through the point of view of teh Consul, a "functioning" alcoholic.read more
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Thoroughly unsatisfying. Lowry's Mexico is superficial and his style, though lyrical at times, unfitting.read more
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The multi-layered structure of the prose contrasts with the further descent of the main character. Terrifying and vivid imagery. A masterfully planned novel of wandering and slouching to oblivion. Definitely should be reread.read more
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The Consul, of a mexican province reunites with his wife on teh Day of teh Dead festival. Teh story is mainly told through the point of view of teh Consul, a "functioning" alcoholic.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Thoroughly unsatisfying. Lowry's Mexico is superficial and his style, though lyrical at times, unfitting.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The multi-layered structure of the prose contrasts with the further descent of the main character. Terrifying and vivid imagery. A masterfully planned novel of wandering and slouching to oblivion. Definitely should be reread.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Drunks are boring. Clever, educated, intermittently lyrical drunks deserve respect for staying sober enough to tap out a novel. But the terrible, gnawing underachievement behind the alcohol? Personally I'm not reliant on drink to underachieve.
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Geoffrey Firmin (fermented, really? – quite a heavy-handed reference) is an alcoholic British consul in a Mexican village. The novel covers his liquor-hazed day on the Day of the Dead, one year after his wife has left him, and ends with his death in a ditch at the side of a dirt road in the jungle.Alcohol filters everything in this novel. The main character cannot crawl out of a bottle long enough to reconnect with his wife or do anything of value whatsoever. It is hard to find anything in this novel to recommend it with a character so at the bottom of the barrel. Bottom Line: A day in the life of an alcoholic – but do you really want to read about that.2 bones!!!!!
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I respect it. Not only is it a shockingly good stream-of-consciousness study of a hard-core alcoholic, but it's also an astute analysis of the world "between the Wars." But I'm really glad it's over, and I'm really glad I don't have to read it again. Lowry himself reportedly considered the book a test of fortitude and staying power. That's pretty much what it feels like for a reader, too. That said, I think it has much more redeeming importance than Joyce, whose stream-of-consciousness is just as difficult to get through, but much more self-indulgent.
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