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The classic collection by one of the greatest essayists of our time.

Published: HarperCollins on Feb 25, 2014
ISBN: 9780062348753
List price: $10.99
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Thoughtful, amusing, understated. This is a delightful read, whether in a large gulp or in small bites at your leisure.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I think most readers only think of White as the author of Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little. These essays are quite funny and give a good look into his life outside of writing.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
All-time favorite; for anyone who values style.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Time has not been kind to these essays. That isn't to say that the subjects are out of date (they aren't, or at least, the essays can be read and enjoyed as a part of their time) nor that the themes are not relevant. Nor is it to say that they are not well written. White's craftsmanship as a writer is highly visible, and every aspiring writer would do well to look at the way sentences are constructed, images are built, and words are chosen (to name just a few of the lessons) in order to learn about the craft.No, the reason time has not been kind is that the actual style of writing feels old. And I think it is a testament to White's skill that these pieces have not fallen over with the ricketiness of age. But styles do change, and these essays are starting to show some of the dust.That is not to say this collection should be avoided (even beyond my previous admonishment for all writers to read them.) While some pieces in particular do not hold up well, others are still quite enjoyable. Foremost among these is "The Years of Wonder" – a reminiscence of White's voyage to the Bering Strait while still a teenager.Part of why this piece succeeds (while the others have slowed down with age) is that it brings a strong narrative to the essay. And, I guess that is why I felt the others didn't hold up as well. Reminiscences of moments in life (a big part of what White is writing about) are so "of the moment" that subsequent moments will leave the writing in the dust. "The Years of Wonder" is not about a moment; it is about the transition of an individual. And the more a piece is about the effect on people rather than what it is that affected the person, the better time has treated that particular essay.There are certain people who will enjoy these essays. Primary among them will be the students – the ones who want to learn how to write. But, in spite of a number of essays that no longer resonate, there is content here that will be enjoyable to the individual that just calls him or herself a "reader".read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very enjoyable and interesting essays.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One of the older books in my library, but still a favorite to take out on rainy days and re-read. I bought this hardback for $6.99 a lot of years ago, and this is one of a handful of books that have made moves with me across the country a time or two. I've sold books at a garage sale before, but you won't ever find this one there.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved it. This is a book of essays. If you are only familiar with his children books, this will be a great change of pace for you. Very descriptive writing.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Essays of E.B. White are quite simply some of the most endearing words ever captured on paper. White’s genial, conversational tone is inviting throughout, and he possesses an unmatched talent for storytelling. He is quite simply a master at turning seemingly mundane events into vibrant stories.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This collection of thirty-one essays by E.B. White is as delightful as it is varied. The essays are arranged by subject - the farm, the city, and memories, to name a few - but even within these subjects, the collection showcases the breadth of White's thoughts and interests. In one, he discusses "The Death of a Pig," a short but powerful piece that gave me a glimpse of the man who would save the pig in Charlotte's Web. In another, he wrestles with the troubles of hydrogen bomb testing and disarmament, never giving a definite Answer, but provoking thought in himself and his reader.I took several weeks to read these essays, not out of any lack of enjoyment but because of the need to savor each and pause between them. I've come to the conclusion that collections like this need to be owned rather than borrowed so that I can take my time and muse over each one instead of trying to hurry through and evaluate the book as a whole. I loved White's sense of humor, which permeates every essay and includes a few good one liners about politics, "progress," and even himself. In the foreword, he writes, "The essayist is a self-liberated man, sustained by the childish belief that everything he thinks about, everything that happens to him, is of general interest." Though I can't say much about general interest, I can say that this collection was to my interest, and I would love to own this collection to dip into whenever I like.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Thoughtful, amusing, understated. This is a delightful read, whether in a large gulp or in small bites at your leisure.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I think most readers only think of White as the author of Charlotte's Web and Stuart Little. These essays are quite funny and give a good look into his life outside of writing.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
All-time favorite; for anyone who values style.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Time has not been kind to these essays. That isn't to say that the subjects are out of date (they aren't, or at least, the essays can be read and enjoyed as a part of their time) nor that the themes are not relevant. Nor is it to say that they are not well written. White's craftsmanship as a writer is highly visible, and every aspiring writer would do well to look at the way sentences are constructed, images are built, and words are chosen (to name just a few of the lessons) in order to learn about the craft.No, the reason time has not been kind is that the actual style of writing feels old. And I think it is a testament to White's skill that these pieces have not fallen over with the ricketiness of age. But styles do change, and these essays are starting to show some of the dust.That is not to say this collection should be avoided (even beyond my previous admonishment for all writers to read them.) While some pieces in particular do not hold up well, others are still quite enjoyable. Foremost among these is "The Years of Wonder" – a reminiscence of White's voyage to the Bering Strait while still a teenager.Part of why this piece succeeds (while the others have slowed down with age) is that it brings a strong narrative to the essay. And, I guess that is why I felt the others didn't hold up as well. Reminiscences of moments in life (a big part of what White is writing about) are so "of the moment" that subsequent moments will leave the writing in the dust. "The Years of Wonder" is not about a moment; it is about the transition of an individual. And the more a piece is about the effect on people rather than what it is that affected the person, the better time has treated that particular essay.There are certain people who will enjoy these essays. Primary among them will be the students – the ones who want to learn how to write. But, in spite of a number of essays that no longer resonate, there is content here that will be enjoyable to the individual that just calls him or herself a "reader".
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very enjoyable and interesting essays.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One of the older books in my library, but still a favorite to take out on rainy days and re-read. I bought this hardback for $6.99 a lot of years ago, and this is one of a handful of books that have made moves with me across the country a time or two. I've sold books at a garage sale before, but you won't ever find this one there.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved it. This is a book of essays. If you are only familiar with his children books, this will be a great change of pace for you. Very descriptive writing.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Essays of E.B. White are quite simply some of the most endearing words ever captured on paper. White’s genial, conversational tone is inviting throughout, and he possesses an unmatched talent for storytelling. He is quite simply a master at turning seemingly mundane events into vibrant stories.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This collection of thirty-one essays by E.B. White is as delightful as it is varied. The essays are arranged by subject - the farm, the city, and memories, to name a few - but even within these subjects, the collection showcases the breadth of White's thoughts and interests. In one, he discusses "The Death of a Pig," a short but powerful piece that gave me a glimpse of the man who would save the pig in Charlotte's Web. In another, he wrestles with the troubles of hydrogen bomb testing and disarmament, never giving a definite Answer, but provoking thought in himself and his reader.I took several weeks to read these essays, not out of any lack of enjoyment but because of the need to savor each and pause between them. I've come to the conclusion that collections like this need to be owned rather than borrowed so that I can take my time and muse over each one instead of trying to hurry through and evaluate the book as a whole. I loved White's sense of humor, which permeates every essay and includes a few good one liners about politics, "progress," and even himself. In the foreword, he writes, "The essayist is a self-liberated man, sustained by the childish belief that everything he thinks about, everything that happens to him, is of general interest." Though I can't say much about general interest, I can say that this collection was to my interest, and I would love to own this collection to dip into whenever I like.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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