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For thirty-five girls, the Selection is the chance of a lifetime. The opportunity to escape the life laid out for them since birth. To be swept up in a world of glittering gowns and priceless jewels. To live in a palace and compete for the heart of gorgeous Prince Maxon.

But for America Singer, being Selected is a nightmare. It means turning her back on her secret love with Aspen, who is a caste below her. Leaving her home to enter a fierce competition for a crown she doesn't want. Living in a palace that is constantly threatened by violent rebel attacks.

Then America meets Prince Maxon. Gradually, she starts to question all the plans she's made for herself—and realizes that the life she's always dreamed of may not compare to a future she never imagined.

Topics: Princesses, Dystopia, Dramatic, Royalty, Marriage, Princes, Love, Social Class, Social Status, Redheaded Characters, Female Protagonist, Rivals, Secret Lovers, and Enemies to Lovers

Published: HarperTeen an imprint of HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062059956
List price: $9.99
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To the bones I took is as a view of a teenage girl who is a fish out of water in her own world. She lost the one she “loves” and seeks escape where she can. Then along the way she finds that life isn’t over and that she can move on with herself, only to have the reason she left tossed back in her face. Having run which is what most 17 year olds would do in a given situation, (please note I said MOST) she was mature enough to choose herself over what the others wanted of her. I have seen a life version of this and that was not the choice they had made.

This book shows that standing up for what you believe in is worth wild and that it is truly better to be yourself most of the time, because even in everyday life people still pretend some days. The language and writing style is that of the teens this day and age which is not always correct but they are shaping the future and with it the English language as we know it. For examples please read a few of the reviews and comments which I had the pleasure of cringing at.

Needless to say I did enjoy this book, but won’t win the Pulitzer that’s for sure. It is a teen romance that embodies just that romance and the ideals of the young people today. I would recommend it to some teens I know.
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If you want a story that is a mix of a modern day Cinderella and "The Bachelor" this is the book for you. A fun read!more
This was a really fun, light and fluffy read. There were some things that irritated me (particularly the poor world-building), but it still kept my interest and was very enjoyable. The last section was kind of disappointing, the love-triangle felt rather forced, and sometimes America did silly things that bugged me, yet I still really liked it. I appreciated that it was a clean read, with only a handful of cuss words. My middle-schoolers LOVE this book, although one of them mentioned to me that it looked like the girl on the cover was smelling her armpit, and now that is all I see when I look at it!more
Dystopia and Reality TV? This looks to be something really up my alley.

Update. Finished this on May 25 but writing the review 2 days later, which is never a good thing. I forget so easily.

I liked the book in some parts, I liked the idea of 35 girls fighting for a prince. I guess I expected more reality TV like the Bachelorette.
What I did not like was that the girls that the prince did not pick, left by their own demise, or wanted to go themselves.
It would have been more fun to read why the prince did not like so and so girl.

What I also did not like was that it reminds me a lot of The Hunger Games. Since that book was such a hit, you see so many authors trying to write a dystopian based YA novel. The sad thing is that many of them use the same concept. A girl who loves two boys. I liked the book up until the other guy arrived. I thought it was weird he just walked into her room. If he loves her so much, why does he put her in so much danger? She could get the death penalty for treason.

In a way this book was very unrealistic but hey, many books in this category are. The girl is very offensive to the prince and he swallows it all up.lol. It was an easy quick read though. Not much dystopia, more romance.more
3.5 Rating

Ugh.....I can't believe the ending!!!! This was a light fun weekend read. I enjoyed the characters, meaning I liked most and loathed some. America was great, imo. I can't believe who came back in the end for the gut wrenching twist but am happy with the imperfect resolution/ending.more
The Selection was one of the books I wanted more than any others, because it's a dystopia and it has a completely gorgeous cover. Even though I actually don't like the fluffy dress (never been a ruffle fan), it still makes me stare, especially with the ice. Even now, I just got distracted staring at the cover. I think it's something about the colors and the textures to the dress.

Anyway, the description kind of made me laugh a little bit; I mean, it really does sound like a dystopian version of The Bachelor/Cinderella. As far as dystopias go, this definitely is pretty light fare. The society depicted here is a caste system as in olden days, with one's role in society determined by their occupation. Accordingly, women do not have much say in their lives and are required to remain virgins until marriage. Basically, this is a futuristic version of an ancient civilization, which is interesting, but, so far at least, the society really doesn't seem all that bad, although the attacks on the capital are worrisome.

The heroine, America Singer, is as one snarky reviewer pointed out a singer. Surprise. That reviewer deemed this a failure of originality by Cass, but clearly does not understand that historically many people, if they had a last name, had one that referred to their profession (i.e. the reason Smith is so common as a last name is because of blacksmiths, silversmiths, etc.). Research: it is a good thing.

Anywho, the writing definitely is pretty simplistic. Although I prefer complex sentences, I'm okay with Cass' writing. She can get away with it because the story is told from America's perspective. America, as a five (her caste), did not have a great education, so she might not think or speak in a particularly complex manner. Of course, I look forward to seeing Cass really show off her writing skills in later books.

Both Aspen and Maxon have their good points, and their moments that make me feel concerned. As yet, I am not declaring any sort of Team allegiance to either. So far, I suspect that Maxon would be better for America, but I'm not entirely sure that I like him better in general. Aspen definitely strikes me as more swoon-worthy, but Maxon's much nicer. Plus, he can afford to give her the tastiest food.

More than anything, The Selection actually reminds me of Princess Academy by Shannon Hale, which I would definitely recommend to anyone. The Selection is a fun, absorbing read. Will you like it? Well, it's going to be made into a CW television show, and I think it will be a good one (which I know I'll be watching), so if that doesn't appeal to you, The Selection might not either. I, personally, will be looking forward to book two.

3.5/5more
Really interesting book! I couldn't put it down.more
I didn't have any plans at all to pick up this book because honestly, the concept sounded awful. A dystopia-themed Bachelor novel? But I recently had a lucky streak with some novels that I'd been avoiding and turned out to be surprisingly good, so I decided to give The Selection a shot. And to Ms. Cass's credit, I actually enjoyed this book more than I expected to.

The one good thing about this novel is its protagonist, America, who unfortunately also falls into the not-so-good category. (We'll get to that in a second.) America is generally brave and loyal. She's talked into the reality show from hell because of the money her destitute family will receive if she's picked. Of course, America is already in love with a handsome and passionate boy from the Wrong Side of the Tracks who wants to marry her, but blah blah blah things don't work out and America ends up entering the competition. I was actually naive enough to think things were legitimately over with Emo Boy over there, but since he makes a half-hearted return in the last twenty pages or so, we've clearly got a Love Triangle brewing.

Now, on to the not-so-good part about America, which is that she's basically a walking, talking Mary Sue. America is a beautiful, talented singer who loves to spend time signing autographs for people she doesn't know, and is just spunky enough to keep it real with the prince, our Mr. Bachelor. Naturally, the prince is intrigued by her no-holds-barred attitude and, instead of throwing her into the dungeons or just kicking her off the damned show, he continually seeks her out.

The other big problem with this book is the decision to make it a dystopia. Ideally, the point of a dystopia is to compare and contrast it with our own, modern society. It may or may not be complimentary of the world we live in, but it pushes us into thinking about things we probably haven't considered before. There is absolutely NO REASON for this book to have the setting it does, which Ms. Cass seems to be aware of, since the book glosses over world building for 99% of the book. What we do know of America's society makes no sense, as NO COUNTRY EVER could possibly function this way. Families are assigned numbers based on the jobs their ancestors had, so if your parents were poor artists, you had better be, too, dammit. Of course, there's some way to marry up, which was vaguely mentioned more than once and never clearly explained. How far back does the government keep track of this, exactly? Wouldn't it be more beneficial to have SKILLED PEOPLE doing the jobs in your country? Poor families are also denied birth control, leading to massive overpopulation and starvation in the lower class. Which...is probably not how I would prevent a revolution if I ran a country, but that's me.

The fact that our protagonist is named America also ties into the messy world building, in that the explanation for her name is never really made clear. Our protagonist lives in a monarchy, and at one point states that her mother named her America because it means brave. Which might work, if the society saw the United States in a positive light. However, seeing as how this monarchy came into existence after the United States ran itself into the ground, it seems strange that everybody is OK with this kind of incendiary sounding name. Ideally, our protagonist might represent a democratic society, contrasting with the monarchy America currently lives in, but there is NO indication whatsoever of any symbolism here.

Basically, this isn't the kind of book for people who pay too much attention to details, which sounds more condescending then I'm intending. The Selection is pretty clearly Cinderella with a love triangle. And there's nothing wrong with that, if that's what you want. Honestly, I wouldn't be surprised if the whole dystopia thing got added in after the book was written, since it has very little to do with anything.

It should probably go without saying that it's totally unnecessary to drag this thing out into a series. Considering the glacial pace at which this book moves, I can only imagine how the later books will turn out.


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First of all, I am so tired of poorly-though-out dystopias, I could scream. And this one was poorly thought out. The world-building is almost nonexistent. The whole caste system Cass has created fails to make any sense. In what universe would having a caste of *artists* make sense? What if you can’t do anything artistic? (In fact, this is even brought up in the case of the main character’s little brother who cannot paint, nor sculpt, nor sing, nor play an instrument…. you get the idea.) What about rich pop stars? Are they still “lower caste?” It was confusing and weird. Second of all, I am so tired of love triangles… especially love triangles in dystopian novels. Arrrrgh! I can’t really write anything intelligible on the subject. I just don’t want them anymore. And the one in this book is super-noxious because as soon as Cass mentions on, like, page two of the book or something, that there’s a draft for the guys and some of the drafted men end up as guards in the palace, you know exactly what is going to happen. (To top it all off, it conveniently puts the drafted dude in a really high caste, which would totally do away with one of the major points of tension in the novel, so again… obvious.) Why not just put a neon sign on it? Also, in every last YA love triangle, it is always so freaking obvious who is going to “win” in the end (actually, _The Hunger Games_ is a major exception to that, which is another reason it is a cut above its many imitators) and there’s really no suspense. Who on earth ever thought Bella would ever pick anyone but Edward? I mean, clearly some people did, but they were also delusional. Speaking of Bella, I am so tired of self-deprecating heroines. You know what song I hate? I hate that One Direction song, “You don’t know you’re beautiful/That’s what makes you beautiful.” What load of crap are we feeding our young women these days? Why must we hate ourselves to be lovely? Why is being confident in one’s beauty always a hallmark of a “bad guy” character? And speaking of ideas we are feeding our young women, why is it acceptable in this novel for the main character’s boyfriend to freak out because she makes more money than he does? I’m serious. They guy goes on a full out, “It’s my job to provide for you” rant and actually breaks up with her over this! And how come if a girl marries a boy in a higher caste, she moves up, but if she marries a boy in a lower caste she moves down? I mean, I can sort of accept that as part of the “dys” in “dystopia,” but it is still sexist claptrap that I don’t appreciate seeing perpetuated. And trying to make your main character not appear to be the girly ball of sexist ideas she actually is by making her prefer to wear pants? Puh-leeze.Last of all, I am so tired of trilogies. Look, you can’t write a third of a book, end it abruptly, and then call it a “trilogy.” That’s not a trilogy. That’s milking a cash cow. Can’t anyone write a stand-alone novel anymore?For all that, I really liked this book. I’m not going to go into the whole Bachelor meets Cinderella style plot or anything -- which is both a ridiculous and interesting at the same time -- but for some reason, once this book gets going, it really gets going. I almost put it down at the start, due to the aforementioned issues, but for some reason (okay, I was waiting in the car for my husband and I didn't have anything else to read) I kept going and I really, really enjoyed the story. I mean, it isn’t life-changing and if it didn't have a sequel built in, people would probably forget about it before the summer, but it turned out to be a fun read. I read through it pretty quickly, laughed a bit, really enjoyed the character of Prince Maxon, was surprised by more than a few things and will definitely read The Elite when it comes out. Go figure.more
I'll admit that I was a bit skeptical on reading this book but as soon as I started reading it I knew I wouldn't be able to put it down. America is such an honest, defiant, down-to-earth girl. In the beginning she is basically the only girl that doesn't want to throw herself at the prince just because of his status or his looks, which makes her unique. I really like how the relationship with America and prince Maxon develops and how the soon become "much more than friends." I was definitely rooting for Maxon the more I got to know about his character and just how gentlemenly he is. My heart literally ached for him every time he was with America because he knew that she was in love with some one else. The point I'm trying to make is: America deserves a guy like Maxon and they're basically soul mates and she shouldn't even be considering the other guy! Anyway, I really loved this book because of the way Ms. Cass created a completely different world and tied it with romance. I can't wait until the second book, The Elite, comes out this year.more
I just want to start off by saying that I love America. I love that she was honest and herself, not to mention funny. I think that is the main reason I enjoyed The Selection as much as I did. I need to either really like the characters or really hate them. I just need to feel something and I did.The writing was also great. It was so easy to read and I was pulled right in from the first page. I just flew right through this book.The only reason I didn’t give it five stars is beacuse nothing was a surprise. Other than that it was great. If you are looking for a light fluffy read, you need to pick this one up. It is the perfect summer read.I will be reading more by this author. I can’t wait to read book two, The Elite.more
Hunger Games meets Cinderella. Yes, it's one of those books that won't stand the test of time but considering the stuff that is now out there for teen age girls, it was honest and yet sweet.more
I really loved this book. Yes it was simple and a very fast read but something about it really captured me. I'm a sucker for Cinderella like stories and this reminded me of those. Oddly enough it kind of reminded me of Hunger Games. The whole class thing and the competion. I had heard they are making this book into a movie and I hope they do it justice. Looking forward to the next installement.more
I admit, I picked this one up because of the cover. Gorgeous!!! But the story sounded decent, so I gave it a shot... now, I have to say that honestly, there isn't a whole lot here that we haven't seen before. The story is very similar to a lot of things you've likely read -- for example, any teen book that involves a competition -- with hints of the biblical story of Esther around the edges (not sure if that was intentional, though). My biggest complaint is that America comes across as a little too mature and straightforward once she gets to meet the prince, particularly when compared with what we see of her before entering the Selection, so I think I would have liked to see more development pre-Selection of her character. I found it a little off-putting at first, not because I wasn't enjoying it -- the banter is great -- but because I didn't see hints of her no-speech-filter in the first part of the book. So, that was more than a little surprising.HOWEVER... despite that and despite the somewhat redundant plot (and I don't say that in a mean way! it ends up working...), I sat and read the whole thing through in one afternoon. Why? Because ultimately it's a good story with characters you begin to care about, and by the end? You'll yell at the last page because it means you have to wait until next summer for the next installment. I'm really looking forward to the next book, and I'm eager to see where Cass is going with this.more
I was very hesitant picking this book up because of everything that has happened around it, but I finally decided to get it from my library because it sounded to interesting, and I'm so happy I did. The beginning kind of dragged for me, but once America got to the castle with all the other girls, I was hooked. I loved America's relationship with Prince Maxon, and well, I loved Prince Maxon in general. I was kind of confused by the whole caste system and why America and Aspen had to be so secret about their relationship. Was it just frowned upon for America to marry down a caste? Or is it not allowed? But that doesn't make sense. Anyway, the caste system doesn't really matter to the book entirely, so I was able to look over that and enjoy the book. I pretty much loved this book and can't wait to read what happens next.more
America Singer is reluctant to enter the competition to become one of 35 girls selected as a potential mate for Prince Maxon. She already has a secret boyfriend; secret because he's a member of a lower caste. And while she's in a lower caste as well, her mother would never allow her to marry even lower. But when America is chosen as one of the 35, she discovers that maybe her boyfriend doesn't care for her anymore, so she accepts the nomonation as a way to help her family. At first she doesn't care what happens, but soon she discovers that Maxon is not at all what she thought and may be developing feelings for him.more
this book was amazing! easy read but that doesn't stop it for drawling you in, it took me less than a day to read it because i could not but it down i am really looking forward o the next onemore
This book was AMAZING.I initially got interested in it because it reminded me of something else that I read a couple of months ago. This book got me hooked almost instantly. The first few chapters were a bit slow, which may be due to my immediate dislike of Aspen, but once we got to the actual Selection I couldn't stop reading. The way Kiera Cass slowly evolved America and Maxon's relationship while creating character development for all the other characters was remarkable. Yes, there is a love triangle aspect in this book, but I think it's done in a way that's different from other novels. We see both relationships develop and it's not something that came out of nowhere. The book is just really interesting. I finished it in two days and on the last day I just sat there reading it for about 3 hours straight. I can't wait for 'The Elite.'more
When I learned the main character's name was "America Singer" I told myself I should stop reading. I mean, how cheesy can you get? "America Singer" sounds like the next generation of Barbie dolls or something. But I thought the dystopian reality show premise sounded fun, and YA books typically take no time to read, so I forged ahead, hoping for the best. The Selection takes place in a future where the United States has been transformed into a monarchy, Illea. Society is divided into castes, known by numbers, with "ones" being royalty and "eights" being homeless. The main character, America, is a "five" which are artists, even though things like music and painting are traditionally pursuits of the leisure class. I can only surmise that the author thought it wouldn't be glamourous enough to have a farmer or a factory worker as the main character. Anyway, we're told that this is a horrible dystopian world, but the fact is that the castes are allowed to talk to each other, be friends, and even marry, although if a girl marries a lower caste she has to be booted down to that number. But the Singer family is comfortably middle class and when we first meet them they're preparing a nice family meal and they have enough income for things like books, trinkets, dresses and make-up. America does let us know that she has to use her make-up sparingly because she doesn't have enough. The fact is, there are plenty of people living in the modern world who are stuck in worse class circumstances that are just as difficult to get out of. If your biggest complaint is not having enough make-up or a big enough wardrobe, I think you're doing pretty well. America's biggest drama is that she's in love with a boy, Aspen, who is a Six, which is the servant class. The biggest problem with that is her mother's disapproval and the fact that her boyfriend can't handle a girlfriend who earns more than he does. "America, I'm supposed to be providing for you. It's humiliating for me to come here and have you do all this for me." (p. 50) Of course, America totally gets that because her only goal in life is to please her man and get him to propose. The Selection itself is a reality-show style contest wherein thirty-four young women are chosen from across Illea to go to the palace and compete for Prince Maxon's affections. When America is chosen she receives cheers from the crowd in a scene that is plainly lifted from The Hunger Games . . . but whereas Katniss in the Hunger Games was being forced to endure a brutal fight where she would probably die, the worst that will happen to America is she will go home with a nice pay cheque and newly acquired celebrity status. America is also instantly popular as soon as she is chosen, even before anyone knows anything about her, presumably because of her hair colour. But she doesn't receive her accolades with good graces. "So the people seemed to like me, so what? . . . their little signs and cheers didn't matter." (p.103)The plot lacks tension because it's obvious from the start that America is loved by the people and Prince Maxon instantly takes a liking to her, singling her out from the other girls and striking up a special friendship with her. The other thirty-three contestants are never described at all, apart from Marlee, the friendly one, and Celeste, the rich, mean one. And that's exactly as much characterization as they get! The author tries to inject some much-needed suspense into the narrative by introducing a rebel faction out to overthrow the monarchy, but these have to be the lamest rebels in all of fiction. They are not threatening at all. The palace guards are so ineffective that the rebels walk right into the castle grounds, but then all they do is throw bricks and rotten food at the castle! The response to this produce-based attack? The royal family and the Selection contestants hide in a fortified room and several of the girls have breakdowns and start crying! One faints! America and the Prince are unaffected and chat personably throughout the "assault" which further diminishes it. The prince even admits that in the past, the worst the rebels have done is tie up some guards and riffled through their things! They stole some of the prince's cameras! The horror!Also, I think it is worth noting that the author and her agent verbally attacked a GoodReads reviewer who dared to post a critical review of the book. The author and agent's response to criticism is so pitifully immature and unprofessional one can't help but laugh, but its a bitter laugh - no one should feel intimidated to post a review because they might be called names. But even disregarding all of that, The Selection is simply a juvenile effort that doesn't live up to the hype.more
Wow. I picked up this book because of the cover one day (I mean, look at the dress, so cute! Reminds me of The Luxe Series.) Anyway, after picking it up the first time, I put it right back down because I'm not the hugest fan of dysoptian culture. The Hunger Games just mad me mad and, honestly, terrified me a bit. I mean, someone really had an idea to create a world where children kill children? Anyway, I could not get the cover and the story out of my head for weeks, so I finally decided to read it. Sidenote, I think it was also the fact that America, the main character and the girl on the cover, is a redhead, as am I. Anyway, this book was surprisingly captivating. I was enthralled by the world that Kiera Cass created and I loved America and how fierce she was, but how we got to see all parts of her, and how we got to see her open up. I loved America's family, the other Selected, and, of course, Prince Maxon. He is undeniabley adorable and I loved America and Maxon's interactions. On the other point of the triangle, Aspen was a despicable character. His actions constantly made me mad and, in turn, I would be mad at America for going along with it because she "loves" him. Blech. And, yes, like many others, the ending made me so mad! I can't believe it just stopped right there! But, of course, I see how this is a good ending and would make people want to read the next one. I will sure be one of them. I enjoyed the characters, the plot, and almost everything about this book. I would definitely recommend it!more
I originally planned on shying away from this choice but changed my mind when it popped up on my internet library.First let me start with that cover.What I hate: I'm tired of the new cover trend of girls in formal gowns. Has anyone else noticed that almost all YA books with female MC's have a picture of some young thing dressed as if ready for prom?Maybe it's just me.What I like: I like the damn dress which really annoys me. Perhaps that is why I hate all those formal gowned girls, because I wish I could sucker punch them and steal their clothes. I also enjoy how the girls are lined up in a mirrored room. It reminds me that the cover still has some link to the actual book's plot. Lastly, I like that color of blue. Frosty.So what about the book itself?The book follows America Singer (eye roll at the name) who is chosen with over thirty five other girls to compete for the hand of their prince's hand in marriage. Sadly, America isn't too happy about that since she's in love with somebody else...at first anyway.Yes, I know that's a brief description but honestly, not much else is happening in this book, trust me.Anyhoo, overall the story was done fairly well though the names given in this story are horrible at best and abysmal at worst. I'm surprised that Cass didn't go for the gusto and not leave her characters with names normal people would be teased for. But that's no sweat of my back if she named her prince something dorky like Maxton. (Eye roll at the name). After all, what's in a name?The description and writing style by Cass was enjoyable and easy to follow though some of the lines in The Selection were sadly third grade level dorky. Still, I could see past all that as Cass made up for her immaturity by actually letting her characters build relationships rather than fall instantly in love and live happily ever after. Kudos to Cass for that. A little reality in fiction land.On top of that, Cass keeps her MC true, honest (well mostly), and completely and utterly herself. This is something I really enjoyed throughout the plot, she was no regular weak kneed girly girl.As for the prince, well he's a likable sort and I enjoyed that about Cass' story. Too often, authors let their male characters fall into the same ol' bad boy mold. Not Prince Maxton. He's a gentleman and utterly understanding. BUT, I do hold a little grudge that he's so willing to have a harem. Does he really need over thirty girls? I think not.So what didn't I like about The Selection?Well as I mentioned earlier, the corny lines which thankfully were sparse. I also didn't enjoy all the giggling Cass' character did in this story. That should stop. Giggling is annoying, not cute. Perhaps substitute giggling with chuckling or just plain laughing.I don't care as long as GIGGLING is stricken from overuse.I also didn't enjoy that Cass tried to add a measurement of danger to her story by throwing in some rebels. Don't get me wrong, the rebels are fine and dandy by themselves but their attacks were obviously planned by my five year old nephew who loves throwing food and trashing rooms. I never felt any true danger in the plot when Cass described her rebel attacks. I literally shook my head and skimmed to the better parts.But other than those little peeves, The Selection was a good light read and I plan on following Cass' story in the sequel. So, I give Cass' book four stars.more
The concept is a great one, and I really wanted to like it but...Aspen came back into the story, about 3/4 of the way through, and everything went downhill from there. I just don't see how she can denounce her love for him earlier in the book, though she did realize she still held feelings for him, and then jump on him the first chance you get. I suppose since she hasn't seen him in forever, she might have half an excuse, but it just doesn't fly with me. It's annoying me, and I really think she should have thought more about it first, or even after. After the fact she barely even gives it any thought. Aspen in general is also just annoying. He says he loves her, then pushes her away, makes her feel horrible, then comes to get her (i suppose you could call it that..) and totally expects her to love him, and drop everything. He is just way to focused on himself in their relationship, and doesn't give any thought to her wants and obligations.I also dislike that the book stops in the middle of the Selection process. Come on. The Hunger Games wrapped up the killed of 22 people in about the same amount of pages, you couldn't knock off a few more and finish it all up? You don't just stop in the middle of something like that, though I admit it does leave your readers wanting more. But ugh, just finish the book. I did like the concept. I enjoyed learning about the history of Illea, as well as the current political situation. The concept of a Selection to choose the wife of a prince did remind me of the Bachelor, but I put that aside. It's interesting how only the royal, male, children get this privilege, and the women are just married off like sheep. You'd think in the future there would be more rights for women, but that's that. :sI think I'll keep reading the series, just to see if she chooses Maxon or not, and I do like some of the other characters. Shaky recommendation, though I'd like to know what others thought of the book.more
The cover of the book was originally was led me into wanting to read this book and after reading the summary of what it was about, I was intrigued. From page one, I was pulled in and couldn't put this book down. It was a little confusing at first because Kiera Cass jumped right into throwing caste numbers around but eventually all was explained. Other than that, I really have no complaints. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who's a fan of YA books. I can't wait until the second book to this series, "The Elite", comes out Spring 2013.more
Getting a little sick of YA dystopias with love triangles that are also trilogies whose first book leaves off in a bad spot! But I liked the main character and the two boy characters and I'm a sucker for games/tests/reality competitions, so yea, I liked it.Also read it entirely in a day, so it must be quite readable as well.more
I wasn’t sure what to expect when I started, The Selection. I was more interested in the pretty cover than the story and I expected something light and fluffy. Mostly, my expectations were met but there was a little surprise layer to the plot that left me wanting more and in a way caused some disappointments in how the story ended. But, I’m getting ahead of myself.The Selection is much like, The Bachelor, in a post-war society. A prince, holds a contest called “The Selection” where one girl from each province is chosen to live in the palace. Once there, the Prince interacts with the girls, narrowing his choices until he makes one his wife.The society has a numbered caste system- one being royalty and eight the homeless beggars. America Singer, the protagonist, is a five whose especially gifted in music. Even though I felt the writing was very simplistic, I appreciated the way Kiera Cass handled the world building. We are given a bit of history in a way that was relevant to the stony. We were gradually introduced to the system and not given info dumps that can sometimes be boring.She did a great job in the handling of the love triangle - yes, there is one - a feat that I rarely see; so I applaud the realistic handling of the relationships. I didn’t expect the political conflict, but once it was presented I wanted more and was disappointed with the little focus that it had.I’m curious to see where the second book will take us as I expected the prince to have chosen a winner by the end, and The Selection to be over - this was not the case. I suppose I should have expected this as the trilogy is called The Selection, but I’m afraid that the future books might turn out to be melodramatic if this is the case.On its own, the Selection was a fun read and the story has great potential, so I’m looking forward to where the next book will take us.more
I really enjoyed this book. I had never read anything by Cass before. I loved that it was a new thought. Yes, there are books about courting to find a wife for the prince but this is set in the future. The United States of America no longer exists. I look forward to the next book in the series.more
I quite liked this book. It's a quick read and a cute romance. I should say that I found it a quick read but I do think some people would lose interest in the beginning. There's a lot of character building and she doesn't even get chosen as a contestant until page 80 or so. Plus there is a lot of confusing talk of which caste everyone is in, and that's not explained right away. I do hope that in the next book you get to know the other characters a little better. Obviously with 35 girls you're not going to know them all by name, but I feel like you know the mean girl and the nice girl and other than that you don't really know who anyone is. That being said, I will definitely read the next book.more
Oh my gosh, I loved this book. It was just what I needed. So fluffy. So fast. All Love Triangle and pretty clothes. Really, if you try to scratch beneath the surface it falls apart (who are these rebels? what's with the missing history books? who were most of the girls who were selected?) but who needs more than the surface? It's the Bachelor meets Allie Condie's Matched with a touch of Divergent thrown in. And so many pretty clothes!! She should totally go for the prince.more
Review originally published on my blog: AWordsWorth.blogspot.comI really was not sure what to expect going into this reading, other than the cover is gorgeous. I've heard taglines like "The Hunger Games meets the Bachelor", but since I've neither read nor seen either, it didn't help me out any. What I got was a story with more depth than I expected. America is one of 35 girls selected "randomly" to compete for the hand (and heart) of Prince Maxon. It's the world's weirdest beauty pageant, if you will. But it's more than that - America, as a member of one of the lower castes, helps Maxon see what's really going on in the country he's to take over. They form an unexpected friendship, and in turn, Maxon shows America that not everything she assumed about him was correct either.There's a lot going on in The Selection, and a lot of history and mysteries are only hinted at. It definitely sets readers up for the next novel in the series, and I for one will be picking it up to see what happens. America started out a little whiny and delusional (heh), but she started growing on me as she started engaging her brain. Prince Maxon I love. And Aspen...don't get me started. (Not a fan.) Safe to say this was a pleasant surprise.more
Where to start… oh yeah.... I really LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!Concept: I really thought this concept was interesting. It kind of reminded me of the Hunger Games and the Bachelor TV show. The Hunger Games just because there were 35 girls being narrowed down to one winner. The Bachelor TV, because of what is going on in the story. 35 girls are trying to win the love and affection of the Prince of Illea.Two Guys: America Singer is one of the 35 girls that were chosen to live in the palace while the "The Selection" competition was going on. She has been talking to the Prince since day 1. America is more of the prince's confidante than a girl of the Selected. But then Aspen comes back into the picture. Now America has to choose one or the other. Honestly, after what Aspen did to her before she was picked for the selection, I think America should choose to go after Maxon. I look forward to seeing who she chooses. I don't want to say to much else about the book without giving away spoiler information. I will just say this: I LOVED THIS BOOK, and I HIGHLY RECOMMEND IT!!more
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Reviews

To the bones I took is as a view of a teenage girl who is a fish out of water in her own world. She lost the one she “loves” and seeks escape where she can. Then along the way she finds that life isn’t over and that she can move on with herself, only to have the reason she left tossed back in her face. Having run which is what most 17 year olds would do in a given situation, (please note I said MOST) she was mature enough to choose herself over what the others wanted of her. I have seen a life version of this and that was not the choice they had made.

This book shows that standing up for what you believe in is worth wild and that it is truly better to be yourself most of the time, because even in everyday life people still pretend some days. The language and writing style is that of the teens this day and age which is not always correct but they are shaping the future and with it the English language as we know it. For examples please read a few of the reviews and comments which I had the pleasure of cringing at.

Needless to say I did enjoy this book, but won’t win the Pulitzer that’s for sure. It is a teen romance that embodies just that romance and the ideals of the young people today. I would recommend it to some teens I know.
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If you want a story that is a mix of a modern day Cinderella and "The Bachelor" this is the book for you. A fun read!more
This was a really fun, light and fluffy read. There were some things that irritated me (particularly the poor world-building), but it still kept my interest and was very enjoyable. The last section was kind of disappointing, the love-triangle felt rather forced, and sometimes America did silly things that bugged me, yet I still really liked it. I appreciated that it was a clean read, with only a handful of cuss words. My middle-schoolers LOVE this book, although one of them mentioned to me that it looked like the girl on the cover was smelling her armpit, and now that is all I see when I look at it!more
Dystopia and Reality TV? This looks to be something really up my alley.

Update. Finished this on May 25 but writing the review 2 days later, which is never a good thing. I forget so easily.

I liked the book in some parts, I liked the idea of 35 girls fighting for a prince. I guess I expected more reality TV like the Bachelorette.
What I did not like was that the girls that the prince did not pick, left by their own demise, or wanted to go themselves.
It would have been more fun to read why the prince did not like so and so girl.

What I also did not like was that it reminds me a lot of The Hunger Games. Since that book was such a hit, you see so many authors trying to write a dystopian based YA novel. The sad thing is that many of them use the same concept. A girl who loves two boys. I liked the book up until the other guy arrived. I thought it was weird he just walked into her room. If he loves her so much, why does he put her in so much danger? She could get the death penalty for treason.

In a way this book was very unrealistic but hey, many books in this category are. The girl is very offensive to the prince and he swallows it all up.lol. It was an easy quick read though. Not much dystopia, more romance.more
3.5 Rating

Ugh.....I can't believe the ending!!!! This was a light fun weekend read. I enjoyed the characters, meaning I liked most and loathed some. America was great, imo. I can't believe who came back in the end for the gut wrenching twist but am happy with the imperfect resolution/ending.more
The Selection was one of the books I wanted more than any others, because it's a dystopia and it has a completely gorgeous cover. Even though I actually don't like the fluffy dress (never been a ruffle fan), it still makes me stare, especially with the ice. Even now, I just got distracted staring at the cover. I think it's something about the colors and the textures to the dress.

Anyway, the description kind of made me laugh a little bit; I mean, it really does sound like a dystopian version of The Bachelor/Cinderella. As far as dystopias go, this definitely is pretty light fare. The society depicted here is a caste system as in olden days, with one's role in society determined by their occupation. Accordingly, women do not have much say in their lives and are required to remain virgins until marriage. Basically, this is a futuristic version of an ancient civilization, which is interesting, but, so far at least, the society really doesn't seem all that bad, although the attacks on the capital are worrisome.

The heroine, America Singer, is as one snarky reviewer pointed out a singer. Surprise. That reviewer deemed this a failure of originality by Cass, but clearly does not understand that historically many people, if they had a last name, had one that referred to their profession (i.e. the reason Smith is so common as a last name is because of blacksmiths, silversmiths, etc.). Research: it is a good thing.

Anywho, the writing definitely is pretty simplistic. Although I prefer complex sentences, I'm okay with Cass' writing. She can get away with it because the story is told from America's perspective. America, as a five (her caste), did not have a great education, so she might not think or speak in a particularly complex manner. Of course, I look forward to seeing Cass really show off her writing skills in later books.

Both Aspen and Maxon have their good points, and their moments that make me feel concerned. As yet, I am not declaring any sort of Team allegiance to either. So far, I suspect that Maxon would be better for America, but I'm not entirely sure that I like him better in general. Aspen definitely strikes me as more swoon-worthy, but Maxon's much nicer. Plus, he can afford to give her the tastiest food.

More than anything, The Selection actually reminds me of Princess Academy by Shannon Hale, which I would definitely recommend to anyone. The Selection is a fun, absorbing read. Will you like it? Well, it's going to be made into a CW television show, and I think it will be a good one (which I know I'll be watching), so if that doesn't appeal to you, The Selection might not either. I, personally, will be looking forward to book two.

3.5/5more
Really interesting book! I couldn't put it down.more
I didn't have any plans at all to pick up this book because honestly, the concept sounded awful. A dystopia-themed Bachelor novel? But I recently had a lucky streak with some novels that I'd been avoiding and turned out to be surprisingly good, so I decided to give The Selection a shot. And to Ms. Cass's credit, I actually enjoyed this book more than I expected to.

The one good thing about this novel is its protagonist, America, who unfortunately also falls into the not-so-good category. (We'll get to that in a second.) America is generally brave and loyal. She's talked into the reality show from hell because of the money her destitute family will receive if she's picked. Of course, America is already in love with a handsome and passionate boy from the Wrong Side of the Tracks who wants to marry her, but blah blah blah things don't work out and America ends up entering the competition. I was actually naive enough to think things were legitimately over with Emo Boy over there, but since he makes a half-hearted return in the last twenty pages or so, we've clearly got a Love Triangle brewing.

Now, on to the not-so-good part about America, which is that she's basically a walking, talking Mary Sue. America is a beautiful, talented singer who loves to spend time signing autographs for people she doesn't know, and is just spunky enough to keep it real with the prince, our Mr. Bachelor. Naturally, the prince is intrigued by her no-holds-barred attitude and, instead of throwing her into the dungeons or just kicking her off the damned show, he continually seeks her out.

The other big problem with this book is the decision to make it a dystopia. Ideally, the point of a dystopia is to compare and contrast it with our own, modern society. It may or may not be complimentary of the world we live in, but it pushes us into thinking about things we probably haven't considered before. There is absolutely NO REASON for this book to have the setting it does, which Ms. Cass seems to be aware of, since the book glosses over world building for 99% of the book. What we do know of America's society makes no sense, as NO COUNTRY EVER could possibly function this way. Families are assigned numbers based on the jobs their ancestors had, so if your parents were poor artists, you had better be, too, dammit. Of course, there's some way to marry up, which was vaguely mentioned more than once and never clearly explained. How far back does the government keep track of this, exactly? Wouldn't it be more beneficial to have SKILLED PEOPLE doing the jobs in your country? Poor families are also denied birth control, leading to massive overpopulation and starvation in the lower class. Which...is probably not how I would prevent a revolution if I ran a country, but that's me.

The fact that our protagonist is named America also ties into the messy world building, in that the explanation for her name is never really made clear. Our protagonist lives in a monarchy, and at one point states that her mother named her America because it means brave. Which might work, if the society saw the United States in a positive light. However, seeing as how this monarchy came into existence after the United States ran itself into the ground, it seems strange that everybody is OK with this kind of incendiary sounding name. Ideally, our protagonist might represent a democratic society, contrasting with the monarchy America currently lives in, but there is NO indication whatsoever of any symbolism here.

Basically, this isn't the kind of book for people who pay too much attention to details, which sounds more condescending then I'm intending. The Selection is pretty clearly Cinderella with a love triangle. And there's nothing wrong with that, if that's what you want. Honestly, I wouldn't be surprised if the whole dystopia thing got added in after the book was written, since it has very little to do with anything.

It should probably go without saying that it's totally unnecessary to drag this thing out into a series. Considering the glacial pace at which this book moves, I can only imagine how the later books will turn out.


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First of all, I am so tired of poorly-though-out dystopias, I could scream. And this one was poorly thought out. The world-building is almost nonexistent. The whole caste system Cass has created fails to make any sense. In what universe would having a caste of *artists* make sense? What if you can’t do anything artistic? (In fact, this is even brought up in the case of the main character’s little brother who cannot paint, nor sculpt, nor sing, nor play an instrument…. you get the idea.) What about rich pop stars? Are they still “lower caste?” It was confusing and weird. Second of all, I am so tired of love triangles… especially love triangles in dystopian novels. Arrrrgh! I can’t really write anything intelligible on the subject. I just don’t want them anymore. And the one in this book is super-noxious because as soon as Cass mentions on, like, page two of the book or something, that there’s a draft for the guys and some of the drafted men end up as guards in the palace, you know exactly what is going to happen. (To top it all off, it conveniently puts the drafted dude in a really high caste, which would totally do away with one of the major points of tension in the novel, so again… obvious.) Why not just put a neon sign on it? Also, in every last YA love triangle, it is always so freaking obvious who is going to “win” in the end (actually, _The Hunger Games_ is a major exception to that, which is another reason it is a cut above its many imitators) and there’s really no suspense. Who on earth ever thought Bella would ever pick anyone but Edward? I mean, clearly some people did, but they were also delusional. Speaking of Bella, I am so tired of self-deprecating heroines. You know what song I hate? I hate that One Direction song, “You don’t know you’re beautiful/That’s what makes you beautiful.” What load of crap are we feeding our young women these days? Why must we hate ourselves to be lovely? Why is being confident in one’s beauty always a hallmark of a “bad guy” character? And speaking of ideas we are feeding our young women, why is it acceptable in this novel for the main character’s boyfriend to freak out because she makes more money than he does? I’m serious. They guy goes on a full out, “It’s my job to provide for you” rant and actually breaks up with her over this! And how come if a girl marries a boy in a higher caste, she moves up, but if she marries a boy in a lower caste she moves down? I mean, I can sort of accept that as part of the “dys” in “dystopia,” but it is still sexist claptrap that I don’t appreciate seeing perpetuated. And trying to make your main character not appear to be the girly ball of sexist ideas she actually is by making her prefer to wear pants? Puh-leeze.Last of all, I am so tired of trilogies. Look, you can’t write a third of a book, end it abruptly, and then call it a “trilogy.” That’s not a trilogy. That’s milking a cash cow. Can’t anyone write a stand-alone novel anymore?For all that, I really liked this book. I’m not going to go into the whole Bachelor meets Cinderella style plot or anything -- which is both a ridiculous and interesting at the same time -- but for some reason, once this book gets going, it really gets going. I almost put it down at the start, due to the aforementioned issues, but for some reason (okay, I was waiting in the car for my husband and I didn't have anything else to read) I kept going and I really, really enjoyed the story. I mean, it isn’t life-changing and if it didn't have a sequel built in, people would probably forget about it before the summer, but it turned out to be a fun read. I read through it pretty quickly, laughed a bit, really enjoyed the character of Prince Maxon, was surprised by more than a few things and will definitely read The Elite when it comes out. Go figure.more
I'll admit that I was a bit skeptical on reading this book but as soon as I started reading it I knew I wouldn't be able to put it down. America is such an honest, defiant, down-to-earth girl. In the beginning she is basically the only girl that doesn't want to throw herself at the prince just because of his status or his looks, which makes her unique. I really like how the relationship with America and prince Maxon develops and how the soon become "much more than friends." I was definitely rooting for Maxon the more I got to know about his character and just how gentlemenly he is. My heart literally ached for him every time he was with America because he knew that she was in love with some one else. The point I'm trying to make is: America deserves a guy like Maxon and they're basically soul mates and she shouldn't even be considering the other guy! Anyway, I really loved this book because of the way Ms. Cass created a completely different world and tied it with romance. I can't wait until the second book, The Elite, comes out this year.more
I just want to start off by saying that I love America. I love that she was honest and herself, not to mention funny. I think that is the main reason I enjoyed The Selection as much as I did. I need to either really like the characters or really hate them. I just need to feel something and I did.The writing was also great. It was so easy to read and I was pulled right in from the first page. I just flew right through this book.The only reason I didn’t give it five stars is beacuse nothing was a surprise. Other than that it was great. If you are looking for a light fluffy read, you need to pick this one up. It is the perfect summer read.I will be reading more by this author. I can’t wait to read book two, The Elite.more
Hunger Games meets Cinderella. Yes, it's one of those books that won't stand the test of time but considering the stuff that is now out there for teen age girls, it was honest and yet sweet.more
I really loved this book. Yes it was simple and a very fast read but something about it really captured me. I'm a sucker for Cinderella like stories and this reminded me of those. Oddly enough it kind of reminded me of Hunger Games. The whole class thing and the competion. I had heard they are making this book into a movie and I hope they do it justice. Looking forward to the next installement.more
I admit, I picked this one up because of the cover. Gorgeous!!! But the story sounded decent, so I gave it a shot... now, I have to say that honestly, there isn't a whole lot here that we haven't seen before. The story is very similar to a lot of things you've likely read -- for example, any teen book that involves a competition -- with hints of the biblical story of Esther around the edges (not sure if that was intentional, though). My biggest complaint is that America comes across as a little too mature and straightforward once she gets to meet the prince, particularly when compared with what we see of her before entering the Selection, so I think I would have liked to see more development pre-Selection of her character. I found it a little off-putting at first, not because I wasn't enjoying it -- the banter is great -- but because I didn't see hints of her no-speech-filter in the first part of the book. So, that was more than a little surprising.HOWEVER... despite that and despite the somewhat redundant plot (and I don't say that in a mean way! it ends up working...), I sat and read the whole thing through in one afternoon. Why? Because ultimately it's a good story with characters you begin to care about, and by the end? You'll yell at the last page because it means you have to wait until next summer for the next installment. I'm really looking forward to the next book, and I'm eager to see where Cass is going with this.more
I was very hesitant picking this book up because of everything that has happened around it, but I finally decided to get it from my library because it sounded to interesting, and I'm so happy I did. The beginning kind of dragged for me, but once America got to the castle with all the other girls, I was hooked. I loved America's relationship with Prince Maxon, and well, I loved Prince Maxon in general. I was kind of confused by the whole caste system and why America and Aspen had to be so secret about their relationship. Was it just frowned upon for America to marry down a caste? Or is it not allowed? But that doesn't make sense. Anyway, the caste system doesn't really matter to the book entirely, so I was able to look over that and enjoy the book. I pretty much loved this book and can't wait to read what happens next.more
America Singer is reluctant to enter the competition to become one of 35 girls selected as a potential mate for Prince Maxon. She already has a secret boyfriend; secret because he's a member of a lower caste. And while she's in a lower caste as well, her mother would never allow her to marry even lower. But when America is chosen as one of the 35, she discovers that maybe her boyfriend doesn't care for her anymore, so she accepts the nomonation as a way to help her family. At first she doesn't care what happens, but soon she discovers that Maxon is not at all what she thought and may be developing feelings for him.more
this book was amazing! easy read but that doesn't stop it for drawling you in, it took me less than a day to read it because i could not but it down i am really looking forward o the next onemore
This book was AMAZING.I initially got interested in it because it reminded me of something else that I read a couple of months ago. This book got me hooked almost instantly. The first few chapters were a bit slow, which may be due to my immediate dislike of Aspen, but once we got to the actual Selection I couldn't stop reading. The way Kiera Cass slowly evolved America and Maxon's relationship while creating character development for all the other characters was remarkable. Yes, there is a love triangle aspect in this book, but I think it's done in a way that's different from other novels. We see both relationships develop and it's not something that came out of nowhere. The book is just really interesting. I finished it in two days and on the last day I just sat there reading it for about 3 hours straight. I can't wait for 'The Elite.'more
When I learned the main character's name was "America Singer" I told myself I should stop reading. I mean, how cheesy can you get? "America Singer" sounds like the next generation of Barbie dolls or something. But I thought the dystopian reality show premise sounded fun, and YA books typically take no time to read, so I forged ahead, hoping for the best. The Selection takes place in a future where the United States has been transformed into a monarchy, Illea. Society is divided into castes, known by numbers, with "ones" being royalty and "eights" being homeless. The main character, America, is a "five" which are artists, even though things like music and painting are traditionally pursuits of the leisure class. I can only surmise that the author thought it wouldn't be glamourous enough to have a farmer or a factory worker as the main character. Anyway, we're told that this is a horrible dystopian world, but the fact is that the castes are allowed to talk to each other, be friends, and even marry, although if a girl marries a lower caste she has to be booted down to that number. But the Singer family is comfortably middle class and when we first meet them they're preparing a nice family meal and they have enough income for things like books, trinkets, dresses and make-up. America does let us know that she has to use her make-up sparingly because she doesn't have enough. The fact is, there are plenty of people living in the modern world who are stuck in worse class circumstances that are just as difficult to get out of. If your biggest complaint is not having enough make-up or a big enough wardrobe, I think you're doing pretty well. America's biggest drama is that she's in love with a boy, Aspen, who is a Six, which is the servant class. The biggest problem with that is her mother's disapproval and the fact that her boyfriend can't handle a girlfriend who earns more than he does. "America, I'm supposed to be providing for you. It's humiliating for me to come here and have you do all this for me." (p. 50) Of course, America totally gets that because her only goal in life is to please her man and get him to propose. The Selection itself is a reality-show style contest wherein thirty-four young women are chosen from across Illea to go to the palace and compete for Prince Maxon's affections. When America is chosen she receives cheers from the crowd in a scene that is plainly lifted from The Hunger Games . . . but whereas Katniss in the Hunger Games was being forced to endure a brutal fight where she would probably die, the worst that will happen to America is she will go home with a nice pay cheque and newly acquired celebrity status. America is also instantly popular as soon as she is chosen, even before anyone knows anything about her, presumably because of her hair colour. But she doesn't receive her accolades with good graces. "So the people seemed to like me, so what? . . . their little signs and cheers didn't matter." (p.103)The plot lacks tension because it's obvious from the start that America is loved by the people and Prince Maxon instantly takes a liking to her, singling her out from the other girls and striking up a special friendship with her. The other thirty-three contestants are never described at all, apart from Marlee, the friendly one, and Celeste, the rich, mean one. And that's exactly as much characterization as they get! The author tries to inject some much-needed suspense into the narrative by introducing a rebel faction out to overthrow the monarchy, but these have to be the lamest rebels in all of fiction. They are not threatening at all. The palace guards are so ineffective that the rebels walk right into the castle grounds, but then all they do is throw bricks and rotten food at the castle! The response to this produce-based attack? The royal family and the Selection contestants hide in a fortified room and several of the girls have breakdowns and start crying! One faints! America and the Prince are unaffected and chat personably throughout the "assault" which further diminishes it. The prince even admits that in the past, the worst the rebels have done is tie up some guards and riffled through their things! They stole some of the prince's cameras! The horror!Also, I think it is worth noting that the author and her agent verbally attacked a GoodReads reviewer who dared to post a critical review of the book. The author and agent's response to criticism is so pitifully immature and unprofessional one can't help but laugh, but its a bitter laugh - no one should feel intimidated to post a review because they might be called names. But even disregarding all of that, The Selection is simply a juvenile effort that doesn't live up to the hype.more
Wow. I picked up this book because of the cover one day (I mean, look at the dress, so cute! Reminds me of The Luxe Series.) Anyway, after picking it up the first time, I put it right back down because I'm not the hugest fan of dysoptian culture. The Hunger Games just mad me mad and, honestly, terrified me a bit. I mean, someone really had an idea to create a world where children kill children? Anyway, I could not get the cover and the story out of my head for weeks, so I finally decided to read it. Sidenote, I think it was also the fact that America, the main character and the girl on the cover, is a redhead, as am I. Anyway, this book was surprisingly captivating. I was enthralled by the world that Kiera Cass created and I loved America and how fierce she was, but how we got to see all parts of her, and how we got to see her open up. I loved America's family, the other Selected, and, of course, Prince Maxon. He is undeniabley adorable and I loved America and Maxon's interactions. On the other point of the triangle, Aspen was a despicable character. His actions constantly made me mad and, in turn, I would be mad at America for going along with it because she "loves" him. Blech. And, yes, like many others, the ending made me so mad! I can't believe it just stopped right there! But, of course, I see how this is a good ending and would make people want to read the next one. I will sure be one of them. I enjoyed the characters, the plot, and almost everything about this book. I would definitely recommend it!more
I originally planned on shying away from this choice but changed my mind when it popped up on my internet library.First let me start with that cover.What I hate: I'm tired of the new cover trend of girls in formal gowns. Has anyone else noticed that almost all YA books with female MC's have a picture of some young thing dressed as if ready for prom?Maybe it's just me.What I like: I like the damn dress which really annoys me. Perhaps that is why I hate all those formal gowned girls, because I wish I could sucker punch them and steal their clothes. I also enjoy how the girls are lined up in a mirrored room. It reminds me that the cover still has some link to the actual book's plot. Lastly, I like that color of blue. Frosty.So what about the book itself?The book follows America Singer (eye roll at the name) who is chosen with over thirty five other girls to compete for the hand of their prince's hand in marriage. Sadly, America isn't too happy about that since she's in love with somebody else...at first anyway.Yes, I know that's a brief description but honestly, not much else is happening in this book, trust me.Anyhoo, overall the story was done fairly well though the names given in this story are horrible at best and abysmal at worst. I'm surprised that Cass didn't go for the gusto and not leave her characters with names normal people would be teased for. But that's no sweat of my back if she named her prince something dorky like Maxton. (Eye roll at the name). After all, what's in a name?The description and writing style by Cass was enjoyable and easy to follow though some of the lines in The Selection were sadly third grade level dorky. Still, I could see past all that as Cass made up for her immaturity by actually letting her characters build relationships rather than fall instantly in love and live happily ever after. Kudos to Cass for that. A little reality in fiction land.On top of that, Cass keeps her MC true, honest (well mostly), and completely and utterly herself. This is something I really enjoyed throughout the plot, she was no regular weak kneed girly girl.As for the prince, well he's a likable sort and I enjoyed that about Cass' story. Too often, authors let their male characters fall into the same ol' bad boy mold. Not Prince Maxton. He's a gentleman and utterly understanding. BUT, I do hold a little grudge that he's so willing to have a harem. Does he really need over thirty girls? I think not.So what didn't I like about The Selection?Well as I mentioned earlier, the corny lines which thankfully were sparse. I also didn't enjoy all the giggling Cass' character did in this story. That should stop. Giggling is annoying, not cute. Perhaps substitute giggling with chuckling or just plain laughing.I don't care as long as GIGGLING is stricken from overuse.I also didn't enjoy that Cass tried to add a measurement of danger to her story by throwing in some rebels. Don't get me wrong, the rebels are fine and dandy by themselves but their attacks were obviously planned by my five year old nephew who loves throwing food and trashing rooms. I never felt any true danger in the plot when Cass described her rebel attacks. I literally shook my head and skimmed to the better parts.But other than those little peeves, The Selection was a good light read and I plan on following Cass' story in the sequel. So, I give Cass' book four stars.more
The concept is a great one, and I really wanted to like it but...Aspen came back into the story, about 3/4 of the way through, and everything went downhill from there. I just don't see how she can denounce her love for him earlier in the book, though she did realize she still held feelings for him, and then jump on him the first chance you get. I suppose since she hasn't seen him in forever, she might have half an excuse, but it just doesn't fly with me. It's annoying me, and I really think she should have thought more about it first, or even after. After the fact she barely even gives it any thought. Aspen in general is also just annoying. He says he loves her, then pushes her away, makes her feel horrible, then comes to get her (i suppose you could call it that..) and totally expects her to love him, and drop everything. He is just way to focused on himself in their relationship, and doesn't give any thought to her wants and obligations.I also dislike that the book stops in the middle of the Selection process. Come on. The Hunger Games wrapped up the killed of 22 people in about the same amount of pages, you couldn't knock off a few more and finish it all up? You don't just stop in the middle of something like that, though I admit it does leave your readers wanting more. But ugh, just finish the book. I did like the concept. I enjoyed learning about the history of Illea, as well as the current political situation. The concept of a Selection to choose the wife of a prince did remind me of the Bachelor, but I put that aside. It's interesting how only the royal, male, children get this privilege, and the women are just married off like sheep. You'd think in the future there would be more rights for women, but that's that. :sI think I'll keep reading the series, just to see if she chooses Maxon or not, and I do like some of the other characters. Shaky recommendation, though I'd like to know what others thought of the book.more
The cover of the book was originally was led me into wanting to read this book and after reading the summary of what it was about, I was intrigued. From page one, I was pulled in and couldn't put this book down. It was a little confusing at first because Kiera Cass jumped right into throwing caste numbers around but eventually all was explained. Other than that, I really have no complaints. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who's a fan of YA books. I can't wait until the second book to this series, "The Elite", comes out Spring 2013.more
Getting a little sick of YA dystopias with love triangles that are also trilogies whose first book leaves off in a bad spot! But I liked the main character and the two boy characters and I'm a sucker for games/tests/reality competitions, so yea, I liked it.Also read it entirely in a day, so it must be quite readable as well.more
I wasn’t sure what to expect when I started, The Selection. I was more interested in the pretty cover than the story and I expected something light and fluffy. Mostly, my expectations were met but there was a little surprise layer to the plot that left me wanting more and in a way caused some disappointments in how the story ended. But, I’m getting ahead of myself.The Selection is much like, The Bachelor, in a post-war society. A prince, holds a contest called “The Selection” where one girl from each province is chosen to live in the palace. Once there, the Prince interacts with the girls, narrowing his choices until he makes one his wife.The society has a numbered caste system- one being royalty and eight the homeless beggars. America Singer, the protagonist, is a five whose especially gifted in music. Even though I felt the writing was very simplistic, I appreciated the way Kiera Cass handled the world building. We are given a bit of history in a way that was relevant to the stony. We were gradually introduced to the system and not given info dumps that can sometimes be boring.She did a great job in the handling of the love triangle - yes, there is one - a feat that I rarely see; so I applaud the realistic handling of the relationships. I didn’t expect the political conflict, but once it was presented I wanted more and was disappointed with the little focus that it had.I’m curious to see where the second book will take us as I expected the prince to have chosen a winner by the end, and The Selection to be over - this was not the case. I suppose I should have expected this as the trilogy is called The Selection, but I’m afraid that the future books might turn out to be melodramatic if this is the case.On its own, the Selection was a fun read and the story has great potential, so I’m looking forward to where the next book will take us.more
I really enjoyed this book. I had never read anything by Cass before. I loved that it was a new thought. Yes, there are books about courting to find a wife for the prince but this is set in the future. The United States of America no longer exists. I look forward to the next book in the series.more
I quite liked this book. It's a quick read and a cute romance. I should say that I found it a quick read but I do think some people would lose interest in the beginning. There's a lot of character building and she doesn't even get chosen as a contestant until page 80 or so. Plus there is a lot of confusing talk of which caste everyone is in, and that's not explained right away. I do hope that in the next book you get to know the other characters a little better. Obviously with 35 girls you're not going to know them all by name, but I feel like you know the mean girl and the nice girl and other than that you don't really know who anyone is. That being said, I will definitely read the next book.more
Oh my gosh, I loved this book. It was just what I needed. So fluffy. So fast. All Love Triangle and pretty clothes. Really, if you try to scratch beneath the surface it falls apart (who are these rebels? what's with the missing history books? who were most of the girls who were selected?) but who needs more than the surface? It's the Bachelor meets Allie Condie's Matched with a touch of Divergent thrown in. And so many pretty clothes!! She should totally go for the prince.more
Review originally published on my blog: AWordsWorth.blogspot.comI really was not sure what to expect going into this reading, other than the cover is gorgeous. I've heard taglines like "The Hunger Games meets the Bachelor", but since I've neither read nor seen either, it didn't help me out any. What I got was a story with more depth than I expected. America is one of 35 girls selected "randomly" to compete for the hand (and heart) of Prince Maxon. It's the world's weirdest beauty pageant, if you will. But it's more than that - America, as a member of one of the lower castes, helps Maxon see what's really going on in the country he's to take over. They form an unexpected friendship, and in turn, Maxon shows America that not everything she assumed about him was correct either.There's a lot going on in The Selection, and a lot of history and mysteries are only hinted at. It definitely sets readers up for the next novel in the series, and I for one will be picking it up to see what happens. America started out a little whiny and delusional (heh), but she started growing on me as she started engaging her brain. Prince Maxon I love. And Aspen...don't get me started. (Not a fan.) Safe to say this was a pleasant surprise.more
Where to start… oh yeah.... I really LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!Concept: I really thought this concept was interesting. It kind of reminded me of the Hunger Games and the Bachelor TV show. The Hunger Games just because there were 35 girls being narrowed down to one winner. The Bachelor TV, because of what is going on in the story. 35 girls are trying to win the love and affection of the Prince of Illea.Two Guys: America Singer is one of the 35 girls that were chosen to live in the palace while the "The Selection" competition was going on. She has been talking to the Prince since day 1. America is more of the prince's confidante than a girl of the Selected. But then Aspen comes back into the picture. Now America has to choose one or the other. Honestly, after what Aspen did to her before she was picked for the selection, I think America should choose to go after Maxon. I look forward to seeing who she chooses. I don't want to say to much else about the book without giving away spoiler information. I will just say this: I LOVED THIS BOOK, and I HIGHLY RECOMMEND IT!!more
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