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From the Publisher

Flying Coastal British Columbia, where mountains drop into the sea and people practice self-reliance and a different sense of purpose. Airports in British Columbia, along with Arctic destinations, are featured. Contrarian views of the people and places of coastal British Columbia, and off-the-grid living. Written by a flight instructor with 7000 hours of flight experience. Designed for pilots and those with an interest in aviation. The author describes the pilot's approach to decision making on a routine basis. Take the controls of a Piper Arrow for an introduction to the world of flying your own airplane.

Published: Wayne Lutz on
ISBN: 9781452364193
List price: $5.99
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