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From the Publisher

The mostly abandoned cities of the Clarke Belt Habitat Ring are being dismantled. The old KESTS is crumbling, so they decide to return the water ice back to the Earth and the aluminum to the Moon. But they discover that the remnants of the old TANFL rulers of the Earth are living there; how can they prevent them from discovering that Earth is alive, and returning to enslave the people again?

Published: Jim Cline on
ISBN: 9781452401195
List price: $2.99
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