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From the Publisher

Ludy, a slave girl, flees from a Caribbean slave uprising to Philadelphia,1793. She is alone and sick from Yellow Fever, but is saved by three orphaned Haines children who take her home and care for her. She vows to always watch over all Haineses with a gift she has of "drifting" when needed. She escapes from a plantation, lives with Cherokees, and experiences the Trail of Tears.

Published: Nila Gott on
ISBN: 9780961937683
List price: $3.99
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