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From the Publisher

This entertaining and insightful retelling of more than 350 Mullah stories brings the famed Persian legend into the 21st Century. Storytellers, folklorists, Sufis, comedians, wisdom seekers, and everyone who loves to laugh will be enriched and enlightened by the timeless wit, inscrutable wisdom, and uncommon sense of humor of Mullah Nasruddin.

Lethe Press is pleased to announce that one of its books, The Uncommon Sense of the Immortal Mullah Nasruddin, by Ron J. Suresha, has been chosen as an Honor Book in the Storytelling Collections category of the 2012 Storytelling World Awards.

The folk humor collection detailing the exploits of the 800-year-old Turkish "wise fool," published last year by indy publisher Lethe Press of Maple Shade, NJ, was chosen as "A Storytelling World Honor Book" in the annual national refereed competition for valued resources in the "Storytelling Collections — All ages" category.

The book, with a preface by Connecticut Storytelling Center director Ann Shapiro, has already received critical acclaim from Midwest Book Review, which called it "A fine pick and very highly recommended"; an extensive analysis in the scholastic journal Storytelling, Self, Society, and a positive review from the popular Green Man Review.

Published: Lethe Press, Inc. on
ISBN: 9781452414690
List price: $10.00
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