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From the Publisher

"Doubts and misgivings about life after death can be set aside with the gift of this special book." (Dr. Austin Ritterspach, Religious Studies, Indiana University)

In How I Died (and what I did next), an woman office worker dies in the North Tower on 9/11. A little girl is drowned in the 2004 Indonesian tsunami. A Canadian man is run over by a bus. A Vietnamese diplomat is tortured and shot. A Chinese woman dies having a back-street abortion, a drunken Brazilian playboy drives his car over a cliff. Twenty-five such stories are told by souls from all over the globe. Their tales are translated by world famous clear channel, Toni Ann Winninger. Not everything is quite so grim. An old French woman dies peacefully in her bed, a Greek innkeeper has a heart attack while asleep.

The souls tell us first what happened at the moment of death and then what took place afterwards, when they found they were still alive, aware, and free from their body. They danced through fields of flowers, met long lost relatives; two little Italian girls were too frightened to believe they had died and spent time as ghosts; a serial killer suffered the torment of a self-induced hell. Some have found work to do at Home, others have started to plan their next life on planet Earth. We have a slice of the many different things that happened to them, and find ourselves asking the question, "Is this what will happen to me?" Editor Peter Watson Jenkins wisely let this incredible look at the reality of death speak for itself. It is a life-changing book, grim in parts yet amazingly uplifting. Readers have been enthralled:

"This is one of the most wonderful spiritual books I've ever had the privilege of reading."
(Ian Lawton, author of Rational Spirituality)

"The book will definitely help many people heal their fear of dying and the loss of their loved ones." (Toh Lee Sin, Director, Love & Light Festival, Singapore)

Published: Peter Watson Jenkins on
ISBN: 9780982952931
List price: $6.99
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