• book

From the Publisher

Two is trapped: hooked on heroin and forced to sell her body to feed the addiction. Her vampire lover Theroen can lift her from this dark life, but his plans conflict with those of the dangerous elder Abraham, to whom he is bonded by both blood and a long-held promise. Two enters a world of darkness, violence, and despair. She must fight for freedom, both for herself and for those she loves.

Published: Christopher Buecheler on
ISBN: 9781452318677
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Blood That Bonds
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free

    Related Articles

    New York Magazine
    2 min read

    Our Book Critic’s 5 Most Anticipated

    AGAINST EVERYTHING: ESSAYS SEPT. 6, BY MARK GREIF Following on the heels of last year’s ambitious, if somewhat clunkily titled The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973, Grief’s new book collects more than a decade’s worth of provocations from a founder of n+1. In it, he traces the arc of a young intellectual through the Bush and Obama administrations, from the gym to the ramparts. SUBSTITUTE: GOING TO SCHOOL WITH A THOUSAND KIDS SEPT. 6, BY NICHOLSON BAKER Baker is an obsessive with immense powers of observation, a strong social conscience, and, as those fam
    Literary Hub
    15 min read

    On Writing What You Know, Playing with Language, and Teaching DeLillo

    To see Joe Salvatore and Scott Cheshire as great writers is to see them correctly; to see them as Don DeLillo obsessors is to see them a little too correctly. At the end of April, these two will be participating in a conference on DeLillo at the New School. We invited them to talk about their own work in the lead-up to the conference, so here they focus on the classic dictum “write what you know,” and how one should engage with that advice, as well as what language and grammar play can do for and to a story. If you would like to hear them talk more about DeLillo, check out the conference at th
    Literary Hub
    3 min read

    Louis Glück on Realism and Fantasy

    It is entirely possible that I have never had an accurate sense of what is called realism in that I do not, as a reader, discriminate between it and fantasy. My earliest reading was Greek mythology. As with my prayers, nothing was ever deleted, but categories were added. First the Oz books. Then biography, the how-to books of my childhood. How to be Madame Curie. How to be Lou Gehrig. How to be Lady Jane Grey. And then, gradually, the great prose novels in English. And so on. All these made a kind of reading different from the reading of poetry, less call to orders, more vacation. What strik