Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Winner of the 2008 Parsec Award for Best Novel. From the 2012 John W. Campbell Award Nominee.

Why does every superhero have to be superstrong, immune to bullets, be able to fly, and look good in tight clothing and a cape?
What if real superpowers come from inside?

If every super power is supposed to be used for good or evil, why are some people born with completely useless ones?
In this world, the superheroes are heroes, but they're jerks.
The villains are charming, but manipulative and, well, villains.
And both groups got the best powers: flight, super strength, telepathy, genius, fire.

The Third Wave of heroes are stuck with the leftovers: the ability to instantly make someone sober, the power to smell the past, absolute control...over elevators. Bar owner Keepsie Branson has the power that prevents anything in her possession from being stolen. Useless in the realm of crime fighting (or -causing.) Or is it?

**Praise for Playing for Keeps: **

"Lafferty executes the story brilliantly, crafting a city and denizens so well-defined, you'd think they were pulled from a top-selling four-color comic." Award-winning author JC Hutchins

"a super-hero book with a twist ... a truly rousing tale of friendship, sacrifice, and commitment" author Matthew Wayne Selznick

""This is a novel of cliffhangers that had me going from page one until I closed the covers." ~BoingBoing.net

Published: Mur Lafferty on
ISBN: 9781458142177
List price: $4.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Playing For Keeps
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
7th City is a city straight from the comic books--superheroes and villians battle daily in its skies and streets. Not everything is as idealistic as some would like to believe, though. There are those in 7th City not considered strong or powerful enough to gain entrance to the Heroes' Academy. These people, called "The Third Wave," possess strange skills and powers considered too weak to be of any real value to the public. Playing for Keeps is the story of Keepsie Branson, a Third Waver who gets caught up in the power struggle going on in the city. She discovers that maybe her powers, and those of her friends, might not be so useless after all.This is a fun take on the superhero genre and I loved the story, but there are some flaws in the writing that tended to bug me along the way. Not enough to make me put the book down, but minor annoyances in an otherwise fantastic novel.more
I enjoyed this a lot - I was interested in the Seventh City world after listening to Barry Coleman's story. The world-building in this novel was very nice indeed, and the powers were a lot of fun. I found the relationships a little flat, and there was an occasional jarring metaphor. If there's a sequel, I'll read it eagerly.more
Read all 3 reviews

Reviews

7th City is a city straight from the comic books--superheroes and villians battle daily in its skies and streets. Not everything is as idealistic as some would like to believe, though. There are those in 7th City not considered strong or powerful enough to gain entrance to the Heroes' Academy. These people, called "The Third Wave," possess strange skills and powers considered too weak to be of any real value to the public. Playing for Keeps is the story of Keepsie Branson, a Third Waver who gets caught up in the power struggle going on in the city. She discovers that maybe her powers, and those of her friends, might not be so useless after all.This is a fun take on the superhero genre and I loved the story, but there are some flaws in the writing that tended to bug me along the way. Not enough to make me put the book down, but minor annoyances in an otherwise fantastic novel.more
I enjoyed this a lot - I was interested in the Seventh City world after listening to Barry Coleman's story. The world-building in this novel was very nice indeed, and the powers were a lot of fun. I found the relationships a little flat, and there was an occasional jarring metaphor. If there's a sequel, I'll read it eagerly.more
scribd