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From the Publisher

"The Bram Stoker Megapack" assembles 22 classic works by the author of "Dracula," including all of his classic horror novels and a selection of rare and famous stories. Of special interest is the mystery story "Old Hoggen," which has never before appeared in a complete, corrected text until this time (we transcribed it from the 1893 newspaper publication especially for this volume) -- and it's worth the price of this volume by itself! In all, "The Bram Stoker Megapack" collects more than 2,100 pages of classic fiction!


Included are:


THE LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM

DRACULA'S GUEST

DRACULA

THE BURIAL OF THE RATS

THE DUALITISTS

THE JUDGE'S HOUSE

THE MAN FROM SHORROX'

UNDER THE SUNSET

THE ROSE PRINCE

THE INVISIBLE GIANT

THE SHADOW BUILDER

HOW POOR 7 WENT MAD

LIES AND LILIES

THE CASTLE OF THE KING

THE WONDROUS CHILD

THE JEWEL OF SEVEN STARS

THE MYSTERY OF THE SEA

THE MAN

THE LADY OF THE SHROUD

A DREAM OF RED HANDS

CROOKEN SANDS

OLD HOGGEN: A MYSTERY


If you enjoy this volume, please search this ebook store for "Wildside Megapack" to see more entries in the series, collecting great tales of adventure, mystery, science fiction, westerns, ghost stories, and much more. (Sort by publication date to see the most recent additions.)

Published: Wildside Press on
ISBN: 9781479401871
List price: $0.99
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