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Sophie Beckett never dreamed she'd be able to sneak into Lady Bridgerton's famed masquerade ball—or that "Prince Charming" would be waiting there for her! Though the daughter of an earl, Sophie has been relegated to the role of servant by her disdainful stepmother. But now, spinning in the strong arms of the debonair and devastatingly handsome Benedict Bridgerton, she feels like royalty. Alas, she knows all enchantments must end when the clock strikes midnight.

Who was that extraordinary woman? Ever since that magical night, a radiant vision in silver has blinded Benedict to the attractions of any other—except, perhaps, this alluring and oddly familiar beauty dressed in housemaid's garb whom he feels compelled to rescue from a most disagreeable situation. He has sworn to find and wed his mystery miss, but this breathtaking maid makes him weak with wanting her. Yet, if he offers her his heart, will Benedict sacrifice his only chance for a fairy tale love?

Topics: London, Cinderella, Disguises, Retellings, Witty, Servants, Stepsiblings, Illegitimate Children, and Sensual

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061751004
List price: $6.99
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I'm a fan of fairy-tale retellings whether they have fantasy elements or not. An Offer From a Gentleman by Julia Quinn pleasantly surprised me. It was the most realistic retelling of Cinderella I ever read. This is how it could have truly happened (without fairy godmothers and talking animals).

more
An Offer from A Gentleman
4 Stars

Synopsis:
The illegitimate daughter of an Earl, Sophie Beckett is forced to work in her own home as an unpaid slave to her father’s malicious widow. One night, Sophie defies her stepmother, attends Lady Bridgerton’s masquerade ball and catches the attention of Benedict Bridgeton. Benedict will do anything to find the mysterious lady in silver but she seems to have disappeared without a trace. Soon after, he finds himself attracted to a lowly housemaid who makes him feel alive and dream of a future. But can he live without the woman who captured his heart…

Review:
Cinderella is one of my all time favorite fairy tale and this is one of the most heartwarming adaptations.

Sophie and Benedict are a lovely couple and their story is very sweet and romantic. Benedict makes very minor appearances in the previous two books so he is more or less a clean slate and the reader has the opportunity to learn more about him. He is a very gallant hero although he does seem to be a bit single-minded in his immediate love for and desire to locate a complete stranger. Sophie is a very spirited heroine and holds her ground with Benedict but doesn’t seem able to do the same with her stepmother. This may be due to her lack of self-confidence with regard to her status in society. While Araminta is shoved off her rather high pedestal and put in her place at the end, I do wish she had gotten more of a comeuppance.

Quinn’s writing style is immersing and she incorporates wit and humor so well into her story telling. The plot is a little predictable but in a good way, and I appreciated the slight social critique regarding the class divide and the fact that servants are barely noticeable and often treated as less than human.

Overall, the Bridgerton series is immensely entertaining and this installment is no exception. I find myself completely addicted and seem to be reading the books back to back (very unusual for me).more
It is a complete Cinderella story, wicked step-mother and all. Not really my thing.more
I have always had a great deal of respect for Violet Bridgerton. She has raised eight very kind and remarkable children, mostly by herself. She herself is kind and generous and very crafty. I think she is what all mothers should inspire to be. When she tells Benedict in this story "I would allow my children to marry paupers if it would bring them happiness. They would have to be well-principled and hardworking paupers, of course, no gamblers need apply.", she proves that the welfare of her children are more important than society's idea of the perfect marriage. For the most part I think that Benedict forgets this conversation. Because he can't seem to think of Sophie as his wife just as his mistress. I suspect that part of this is that while he thinks he wants to marry he isn't really ready to make that commitment. I think that he has cared more for Sophie than he might ever admit when they finally meet again. I know that he doesn't remember her but there is a small part of him that does remember her.Sophie is definitely a product of her environment. Her stepmother has told her for years that she is not good enough for society and having no other parent to stand up for her she believes it. It is a sad commentary that society at this time look down of illegitimate children with such disdain. It is the child's fault that the parents weren't married. They are just a product of a union that didn't include marriage. Sophie is a kind and intelligent woman that has made the best of what life has given her. She should have had so much more and of course in the end she gets it and more. As for her stepmother someone needs to make her a house maid and see how she likes it. I think that she would be living on the streets in a very short time.Benedict is very much like any middle child I guess. He wants so much for people to see him and not his place in the family. He is more than just the second Bridgerton or a Bridgerton. He is has a sharp wit and a wicked sense of humor. He is a wonderful artist and an adventurer. He is a lover. Benedict is also honorable and decent and very fond of his family.The last third of this books requires lots of tissues are handy. There are some really sad scenes. It is amazing to me that men can be so hardheaded at times. We get to see and hear from Daphne, Anthony and Colin in this book. Colin opens his mouth in public and upsets someone that he shouldn't but he redeems himself partially when he gives Benedict some very good advise. I loved the scene in the jail although I wish Sophie's stepmother had gotten more humiliation for her treatment of Sophie. I am glad that Posy found her backbone and found people that would care for her. I hope that she finds someone to love her. This is a great addition to this series and I look forward to starting the next book.more
Sophie Beckett, recently lost her birth father, and even though he never acknowledged her as his daughter, he still made sure she was cared for until he passed away, and she was left with his wife and step daughters, and was treated more like a servant/slave than how she should have been treated. One night she has a opportunity to go to a ball, where she dresses up like a princess and feeling more beautiful and desirable than she ever has before. On this night she meets Benedict, one of the infamous Bridgertons, and shares a passionate kiss, one that will remain burned in her memory forever. Sophie knows that she can never be a part of Benedict's life, but then through a chain of events, she is thrown in his path once more, and knows that she will love him even though she knows they can never have a future together...An Offer From A Gentleman, is the third in the Bridgerton series. I have just loved reading this series, and this was the first time I was able to read this book ( I know...crazy huh)But I was in the mood for a cinderella type of story, and this one fit the book....I was totally satisfied with this one. I loved every page, every paragraph and sentence. Julia Quinn is one of my favorite historical romance authors....there is a unique way about her writing that is much different from any other....where her stories just draw in her readers and its like you have this compulsion to not let go of the book until you have finished reading it. It had a truly magical side to it, an Enchanting Love Story that will Captivate you!!!!more
Enjoyable re-working of the Cinderella story. Sadly she's still got a long way to go to beat Heyer in the comedy stakes.more
I am really enjoying the Briderton's... i feel like one of the character in the book, maybe a distant cousin... LOL... I have laughed, cheered and cried with them so far.more
A Cinderella inspired Bridgerton book! OMG!!! *dances around the room* I don’t think I have to explain the plot, right? Cinderella inspired says it all. Yes?Oh, I loved it! Loved it! The couple is so cute, and the heroine Sophie is one of my favorites of the series so far. Actually it is not fair for me to say so because all the previous heroines are great, and in my heart they’re all favorites, it’s just that Sophie had such a harsh life compared to them, and still she can be funny and brave and held her chin up high, so I'm declaring her a favorite among favorites. Go Sophie!And Benedict, the most low profile Bridgerton brother since the beginning of the series managed to be the hero and still keep is inconspicuous status, which was fine by me since that gave more room for Sophie to shine. Of course I got mad at him when he put his asshole suit on and insisted upon making Sophie his mistress, when she kept telling him NO, but alas, they got their happy ending! :Dmore
I suspect it must be difficult to write a series of 8 books about one family, occuring in the same time period, without being at a loss for inspiration. Julia Quinn's apparent answer was to recreate the classic Cinderella story. Although I found this story very predictable, it was also quite delightful. Ms. Quinn is such a talented writer that even this tired story line seemed refreshing with these characters. It did not bother me when Benedict suggested Sophie become his mistress. When you consider his social status and the rules of society at the time, it was all but impossible for him to even consider marrying her. He made the only offer he thought was reasonable to assure they would be together. All of the Bridgertons are in high form in this novel. Lady Whistledown still continues to offer interesting observations at the beginning of each chapter. Fans of the Bridgerton series will enjoy this light novel and charming love story.more
An Offer From A Gentleman is the third book in Julia Quinn's Bridgerton series. This book explores the relationship between Benedict Bridgerton (the second born) and Sophie Beckett, an illegitimate daughter of an earl.At the annual Bridgerton’s masquerade ball Benedict - the second of the Bridgerton siblings - falls in love with a beautiful masked woman who suddenly disappears around midnight in true Cinderella fashion. Benedict searches unsuccessfully for years for the masked woman he fell in love with. One night he rescues Sophie Beckett and starts to fall in love with her.Sophie is the illegitimate daughter of the Earl of Penwood. She is left in the care of Araminta, her “stepmother” when her father dies. Like the storybook Cinderella, Sophie becomes the unpaid servant of the family. One evening the other household servants decide to dress her up and send her to the Bridgerton masquerade ball as a treat. The aftermath of this ball are horrible for Sophie. She is turned out of her own home without anywhere to live and no job to support herself. She lands on her feet, however, and runs into Benedict again years later while trying to fend off the lecherous attentions of the son of her latest employer. (all good Regency Romances have to have a lecher!) After Sophie nurses Benedict back to health from a bad cold, he takes Sophie home to find a position in his family home not realizing that she is his fantasy woman from so many years ago. There is something about Sophie that brings out the best in Benedict. He finds himself drawn to her as he was to his mystery woman from years ago. Lady Bridgerton, being the astute mother that she is, sees the chemistry between Sophie and her son. Always trying to marry her children off, she tries to determine if Sophie would make a good daughter-in-law. Benedict seems to struggle with the class difference between Sophie and himself. When Benedict suggests making Sophie his mistress she shows her backbone and stands up for what she believes is right.Julia Quinn does a wonderful job of taking this story from such a prickly situation to a wonderful ending. In the end, Love Conquers All, and we end our story with a two Kleenex ending. Julia Quinn not only provides us with a whole host of roll-on-the-ground laughing interactions between the Bridgerton siblings, but a masterful weaving of a true love story between the members of different classes in Regency England.If you’ve enjoyed the Bridgerton series, there’s no question you’ll love An Offer From A Gentleman. And the mysterious Lady Whistledown, whose Society Papers have opened each chapter in the books, has finally put down her pen. Hopefully, in the next book her identity will be revealed. I can hardly wait.more
-An impoverished bastard of nobility, Sophie Beckett gets her only moment of fairy tale at a masquerade ball, where she meets the dashing and handsome Benedict Bridgerton, who immediately falls in love with the mystery woman. However, when he meets Sophie years later, he doesn't recognize her as his mystery woman, and is torn between his love for that unknown woman, and the desirable one in front of him. Very romantic, again, delightfully straight-forward and charming characters.more
This was just a so-so read for me. I didn’t find Lady Whistledown's columns (the snippets that preface each chapter) or the prose particularly witty or amusing. The interactions among the Bridgerton family didn't annoy me so much this time around however - which is a mystery, but I'm not complaining. As a family they seemed more natural, their banter less grating, their love for each other touching but less saccharine. They were my favorite part of the book. The romance between Benedict Bridgerton and Sophie Beckett, however, left much to be desired. In this adaptation of the Cinderella fairy tale, Sophie is the bastard daughter of an earl. After her father's death, she's forced to slave as a servant for her evil stepmother and two stepsisters (one of whom isn't quite as evil as the other). She gets one night of reprieve from her life of servile drudgery and sneaks off to a masked ball. There she meets Benedict and they fall in love instantly. Nothing too exciting there. It's all very sweet I guess, but their big moment together really didn't grab me. She can't reveal her identity to him and runs away at the stroke of midnight. So that we can have a story, she keeps this secret, even after a serendipitous reunion with Benedict two years later. He saves her from a group of evil, drunken louts and gradually falls in love with what he thinks is a servant. The plot and their relationship revolve around Sophie guarding the secret of her identity like her life depends on it. It was mildly frustrating to me. As was the blandness of the hero. He complains about no one knowing who he truly is, of being known only as a Bridgerton, or simply "Number Two" among his many siblings. Sadly, he never manages to show the reader who he is - there's something about his being an artist thrown in, but nothing's really done with it. Being paired with such a nondescript heroine didn't help him much either. As a Cinderella retelling, An Offer from a Gentleman was disappointing. Sophie was more Disney than Drew Barrymore, and her climactic triumph over the stepmother left me unmoved. (Though I thought Benedict's mother was very cute in rushing to Sophie's rescue.) The stepmother herself was one-dimensional, as was the righteous, long-suffering Sophie. It seemed that the author was trying hard to give Sophie some spunk while under her stepmother's thumb, but it never rang true and I could tell where the story was going from the first page. I’ll still be reading more of Julia Quinn, if only to try and see what makes her so popular, but I couldn’t get into this third installment of her Bridgerton series.more
Another solid instalment in this series. I liked Benedict, he's the only family member that I had found totally unmemorable - but this fits well with his character as he has sides he hides from his family. Sophie grabbed at my heart form her first scene, waiting for her step family to arrive.This manages to be a fluffy romance, a retelling of a the Cinderella story, and the third book in a regency series, and yet it is still fresh. I was not entirely comfortable with Benedict's insistence that Sophie be his mistress, but I fell for his apology.more
This was the first book I ever read by Julia Quinn. It not only introduced me to the Bridgerton genre, but to historical romances, of which I am now an addict. This is a Cinderella-esque story about a woman who grows up serving her stepmother and stepsisters. She sneaks out to a ball and meets Benedict Bridgerton, of the famed Bridgerton family. Two years pass, with her working as a servant and a chance encounter with Benedict renews the relationship. Sophie is a great heroine who overcomes her upbringing and refuses to allow choices to be made for her. Quinn also makes it completely believable that Benedict doesn't recognize Sophie as the same woman he met at the ball.more
This is a cute retelling of "Cinderella" - Julia Quinn style. Sophie is the sweet, abused Cinderella character, complete with the wicked stepmother and evil stepsisters. She's dressed up by loyal servants to have one evening at a ball - from which she must return by midnight - and at that ball falls in love with Prince Charming - Benedict Bridgerton. It's cute to see this story played out in Regency England, and with our beloved Bridgertons. Unlike in Cinderella, though, things don't go "happily ever after" quite so easy. For one thing, Benedict doesn't even recognize her when they first meet again - much to Sophie's dismay. I enjoyed this book a great deal!more
An Offer from a Gentleman by Julia QuinnThe Bridgerton family is wealthy, well born, and universally admired. And with six of the eight Bridgerton children already mingling with society, it's no wonder they're mentioned so frequently in the most popular (and accurate) source of social news, Lady Whistledown's Society Papers. But not even the mysterious Lady Whistledown can identify the masked maiden who completely captivated the Bridgerton second son, Benedict, at his mother's masquerade ball -- a silver-clad beauty who vanished on the stroke of midnight. It was a magical night for Sophie Beckett, orphaned, illegitimate daughter of the Earl of Penwood. Attending the ball was a beautiful dream, sharing the evening with Benedict Bridgerton was the stuff of fantasy -- and returning home to her role as unpaid servant to her father's cruel widow and stepdaughters was a nightmare. Then she lost even the small security of that position, and things went from bad to worse. By the time Sophie met Benedict again, she was in truly desperate straits. He made her feel precious, even in rags, but Sophie had grave reservations about accepting.I really enjoyed this addition to the Bridgerton family saga.At last, I had characters who didn't have to marry because the woman had been compromised, and in fact, it looked like they wouldn't be able to marry at all for most of the book.Despite it probably being inappropriate for a modern woman to say so, the whole Cinderella-story works for me. And this is very clearly a telling of the Cinderella story, complete with an evil stepmother, stepsisters and a suitably handsome prince in Benedict. At the same time, Quinn doesn't let the fairy-tale direction of her story overcome the setting she has chosen to use.The title comes from Benedict's not-exactly-honourable offer to Sophie that she become his mistress. Not perhaps what one immediately wants in a romantic hero, but given their positions and the society they live in, exactly what a gentleman in his position would do. Sophie's reasons for refusing are sensible and certain and the story unfolds as they try to find their own balance and resolution.Of course, there is a happy ending. Perhaps the way it comes about is a little too pat, but not by much. I can easily imagine Violet Bridgerton "convincing" Sophie's stepmother to do pretty much anything she wished, and the hero and heroine are engaging to the reader, so that I wanted them to get their happy ever after in true fairy tale fashion.A fun read.An Offer From a GentlemanBridgertons, Book 3Julia Quinn7/10more
i loved loved loved this cinderella-esque story. the ball at the beginning is totally worth reading over and over.more
An Offer is both a Bridgerton story and a Cinderella retelling. While I'm very fond of the Bridgerton series in general, I find this story, in particular, flawed. Benedict uses the power structures of his misogynist and classist society to seduce Sophie: he tells her that if she leaves him he'll falsely accuse her of theft and have her transported to Australia; he forcibly installs her in his mother's house as a servant; he takes advantage of his position of a son of the house to repeatedly accost her against her will. That he and his family are benevolent, and that Sophie loves him, are ultimately less important to me than the abuse of power he uses to gain her love.Ironically, in a book by a less skilled author I'd not have judged the power imbalance (very common in Regency romances) so harshly. But the Bridgerton series rarely resorts to this tired old trope: the forceful hero persuades the heroine that lust means true love.more
yo soy española y el libro es de otra lengua lo kiero leer?????soy una fanática de la lectutamore
Amazing read!more
Not my fav of her books. I don't like how Benedict continues to push Sophie to be his mistress. He never seems to get a clue about the impact to her life.more
Touching love story. Very well written, with likable H&H as well as secondary characters, along with dis-likable villainous characters. A story guaranteed to stirs the emotions of the incurable romantic.more
Lovely Cinderella story, Sophie the heroine is charming and the hero is delectable. Love this series.more
I adore Benedict! I appreciated the plot. it was Cinderella with a wicked twist. first JQ book I ever read and I've been a fan ever sincemore
it's a great book
more
another cinderellamore
It started with so much promise, the plot and dialogue were quite good and the characters intriguing, minding me much of the movie 'Ever After,' but then they are both retellings of the Cinderella story. But then the plot became predictable and the characters showed themselves to be quite without, 'character.' If this is the modern idea of a 'hero' and 'love,' then we had all best take Hamlet's advice and get ourselves to a nunnery. While there are several references to the works of Miss Austen and Baroness Orczy, the closest this book gets to such vital characters are the names. The heroine is accidentally referred to as 'Miss Bennet,' in one scene and she minds me much of Kitty Bennet in her wish-washy evaluation of life, the universe, and everything. She is praised for 'standing up for what she believes in.' except that she doesn't really believe in anything and also fails to stand up for it. She annoys me, but I really wanted to thump the gentleman! How can he profess to love her and be portrayed as everything good and heroic when he has not the heart to either marry the girl or live with his disappointment, instead he wants all the convenience of her body and affections yet none of the bother of doing what is right and proper by his beloved? And then she puts up with it, repeatedly! And then she gives into him on several occasions only to reaffirm her determination not to give in! She acts more like an addict than a sensible woman in love, but then love can make fools of the best of us. The lady likes novels, I would highly recommend anything by Jane Austen or maybe 'Jane Eyre,' 'Les Miserables,' 'A Tale of Two Cities,' or even 'The Merry Wives of Windsor;' she could learn much about what true love, character, and devotion look like. I haven't read anything this insipid since the 'The Three Musketeers,' which is another puzzle in itself. It started out so well, but I was quite disappointed. Go watch 'Ever After,' if you need a Cinderella fix.more
hellow po ate wla po bng tagalog ntong story nosebleed akoh ehh ang ganda sana ng title nyo at im sure ang ganda rin ng storyang ito pwo na nosebleed po akoh ehh?_? ang sakit na nga ng ulo koh ...
nagtanung lng ako po... kng Mrng tagalog hihihihihihih tyms po?more
Read all 28 reviews

Reviews

I'm a fan of fairy-tale retellings whether they have fantasy elements or not. An Offer From a Gentleman by Julia Quinn pleasantly surprised me. It was the most realistic retelling of Cinderella I ever read. This is how it could have truly happened (without fairy godmothers and talking animals).

more
An Offer from A Gentleman
4 Stars

Synopsis:
The illegitimate daughter of an Earl, Sophie Beckett is forced to work in her own home as an unpaid slave to her father’s malicious widow. One night, Sophie defies her stepmother, attends Lady Bridgerton’s masquerade ball and catches the attention of Benedict Bridgeton. Benedict will do anything to find the mysterious lady in silver but she seems to have disappeared without a trace. Soon after, he finds himself attracted to a lowly housemaid who makes him feel alive and dream of a future. But can he live without the woman who captured his heart…

Review:
Cinderella is one of my all time favorite fairy tale and this is one of the most heartwarming adaptations.

Sophie and Benedict are a lovely couple and their story is very sweet and romantic. Benedict makes very minor appearances in the previous two books so he is more or less a clean slate and the reader has the opportunity to learn more about him. He is a very gallant hero although he does seem to be a bit single-minded in his immediate love for and desire to locate a complete stranger. Sophie is a very spirited heroine and holds her ground with Benedict but doesn’t seem able to do the same with her stepmother. This may be due to her lack of self-confidence with regard to her status in society. While Araminta is shoved off her rather high pedestal and put in her place at the end, I do wish she had gotten more of a comeuppance.

Quinn’s writing style is immersing and she incorporates wit and humor so well into her story telling. The plot is a little predictable but in a good way, and I appreciated the slight social critique regarding the class divide and the fact that servants are barely noticeable and often treated as less than human.

Overall, the Bridgerton series is immensely entertaining and this installment is no exception. I find myself completely addicted and seem to be reading the books back to back (very unusual for me).more
It is a complete Cinderella story, wicked step-mother and all. Not really my thing.more
I have always had a great deal of respect for Violet Bridgerton. She has raised eight very kind and remarkable children, mostly by herself. She herself is kind and generous and very crafty. I think she is what all mothers should inspire to be. When she tells Benedict in this story "I would allow my children to marry paupers if it would bring them happiness. They would have to be well-principled and hardworking paupers, of course, no gamblers need apply.", she proves that the welfare of her children are more important than society's idea of the perfect marriage. For the most part I think that Benedict forgets this conversation. Because he can't seem to think of Sophie as his wife just as his mistress. I suspect that part of this is that while he thinks he wants to marry he isn't really ready to make that commitment. I think that he has cared more for Sophie than he might ever admit when they finally meet again. I know that he doesn't remember her but there is a small part of him that does remember her.Sophie is definitely a product of her environment. Her stepmother has told her for years that she is not good enough for society and having no other parent to stand up for her she believes it. It is a sad commentary that society at this time look down of illegitimate children with such disdain. It is the child's fault that the parents weren't married. They are just a product of a union that didn't include marriage. Sophie is a kind and intelligent woman that has made the best of what life has given her. She should have had so much more and of course in the end she gets it and more. As for her stepmother someone needs to make her a house maid and see how she likes it. I think that she would be living on the streets in a very short time.Benedict is very much like any middle child I guess. He wants so much for people to see him and not his place in the family. He is more than just the second Bridgerton or a Bridgerton. He is has a sharp wit and a wicked sense of humor. He is a wonderful artist and an adventurer. He is a lover. Benedict is also honorable and decent and very fond of his family.The last third of this books requires lots of tissues are handy. There are some really sad scenes. It is amazing to me that men can be so hardheaded at times. We get to see and hear from Daphne, Anthony and Colin in this book. Colin opens his mouth in public and upsets someone that he shouldn't but he redeems himself partially when he gives Benedict some very good advise. I loved the scene in the jail although I wish Sophie's stepmother had gotten more humiliation for her treatment of Sophie. I am glad that Posy found her backbone and found people that would care for her. I hope that she finds someone to love her. This is a great addition to this series and I look forward to starting the next book.more
Sophie Beckett, recently lost her birth father, and even though he never acknowledged her as his daughter, he still made sure she was cared for until he passed away, and she was left with his wife and step daughters, and was treated more like a servant/slave than how she should have been treated. One night she has a opportunity to go to a ball, where she dresses up like a princess and feeling more beautiful and desirable than she ever has before. On this night she meets Benedict, one of the infamous Bridgertons, and shares a passionate kiss, one that will remain burned in her memory forever. Sophie knows that she can never be a part of Benedict's life, but then through a chain of events, she is thrown in his path once more, and knows that she will love him even though she knows they can never have a future together...An Offer From A Gentleman, is the third in the Bridgerton series. I have just loved reading this series, and this was the first time I was able to read this book ( I know...crazy huh)But I was in the mood for a cinderella type of story, and this one fit the book....I was totally satisfied with this one. I loved every page, every paragraph and sentence. Julia Quinn is one of my favorite historical romance authors....there is a unique way about her writing that is much different from any other....where her stories just draw in her readers and its like you have this compulsion to not let go of the book until you have finished reading it. It had a truly magical side to it, an Enchanting Love Story that will Captivate you!!!!more
Enjoyable re-working of the Cinderella story. Sadly she's still got a long way to go to beat Heyer in the comedy stakes.more
I am really enjoying the Briderton's... i feel like one of the character in the book, maybe a distant cousin... LOL... I have laughed, cheered and cried with them so far.more
A Cinderella inspired Bridgerton book! OMG!!! *dances around the room* I don’t think I have to explain the plot, right? Cinderella inspired says it all. Yes?Oh, I loved it! Loved it! The couple is so cute, and the heroine Sophie is one of my favorites of the series so far. Actually it is not fair for me to say so because all the previous heroines are great, and in my heart they’re all favorites, it’s just that Sophie had such a harsh life compared to them, and still she can be funny and brave and held her chin up high, so I'm declaring her a favorite among favorites. Go Sophie!And Benedict, the most low profile Bridgerton brother since the beginning of the series managed to be the hero and still keep is inconspicuous status, which was fine by me since that gave more room for Sophie to shine. Of course I got mad at him when he put his asshole suit on and insisted upon making Sophie his mistress, when she kept telling him NO, but alas, they got their happy ending! :Dmore
I suspect it must be difficult to write a series of 8 books about one family, occuring in the same time period, without being at a loss for inspiration. Julia Quinn's apparent answer was to recreate the classic Cinderella story. Although I found this story very predictable, it was also quite delightful. Ms. Quinn is such a talented writer that even this tired story line seemed refreshing with these characters. It did not bother me when Benedict suggested Sophie become his mistress. When you consider his social status and the rules of society at the time, it was all but impossible for him to even consider marrying her. He made the only offer he thought was reasonable to assure they would be together. All of the Bridgertons are in high form in this novel. Lady Whistledown still continues to offer interesting observations at the beginning of each chapter. Fans of the Bridgerton series will enjoy this light novel and charming love story.more
An Offer From A Gentleman is the third book in Julia Quinn's Bridgerton series. This book explores the relationship between Benedict Bridgerton (the second born) and Sophie Beckett, an illegitimate daughter of an earl.At the annual Bridgerton’s masquerade ball Benedict - the second of the Bridgerton siblings - falls in love with a beautiful masked woman who suddenly disappears around midnight in true Cinderella fashion. Benedict searches unsuccessfully for years for the masked woman he fell in love with. One night he rescues Sophie Beckett and starts to fall in love with her.Sophie is the illegitimate daughter of the Earl of Penwood. She is left in the care of Araminta, her “stepmother” when her father dies. Like the storybook Cinderella, Sophie becomes the unpaid servant of the family. One evening the other household servants decide to dress her up and send her to the Bridgerton masquerade ball as a treat. The aftermath of this ball are horrible for Sophie. She is turned out of her own home without anywhere to live and no job to support herself. She lands on her feet, however, and runs into Benedict again years later while trying to fend off the lecherous attentions of the son of her latest employer. (all good Regency Romances have to have a lecher!) After Sophie nurses Benedict back to health from a bad cold, he takes Sophie home to find a position in his family home not realizing that she is his fantasy woman from so many years ago. There is something about Sophie that brings out the best in Benedict. He finds himself drawn to her as he was to his mystery woman from years ago. Lady Bridgerton, being the astute mother that she is, sees the chemistry between Sophie and her son. Always trying to marry her children off, she tries to determine if Sophie would make a good daughter-in-law. Benedict seems to struggle with the class difference between Sophie and himself. When Benedict suggests making Sophie his mistress she shows her backbone and stands up for what she believes is right.Julia Quinn does a wonderful job of taking this story from such a prickly situation to a wonderful ending. In the end, Love Conquers All, and we end our story with a two Kleenex ending. Julia Quinn not only provides us with a whole host of roll-on-the-ground laughing interactions between the Bridgerton siblings, but a masterful weaving of a true love story between the members of different classes in Regency England.If you’ve enjoyed the Bridgerton series, there’s no question you’ll love An Offer From A Gentleman. And the mysterious Lady Whistledown, whose Society Papers have opened each chapter in the books, has finally put down her pen. Hopefully, in the next book her identity will be revealed. I can hardly wait.more
-An impoverished bastard of nobility, Sophie Beckett gets her only moment of fairy tale at a masquerade ball, where she meets the dashing and handsome Benedict Bridgerton, who immediately falls in love with the mystery woman. However, when he meets Sophie years later, he doesn't recognize her as his mystery woman, and is torn between his love for that unknown woman, and the desirable one in front of him. Very romantic, again, delightfully straight-forward and charming characters.more
This was just a so-so read for me. I didn’t find Lady Whistledown's columns (the snippets that preface each chapter) or the prose particularly witty or amusing. The interactions among the Bridgerton family didn't annoy me so much this time around however - which is a mystery, but I'm not complaining. As a family they seemed more natural, their banter less grating, their love for each other touching but less saccharine. They were my favorite part of the book. The romance between Benedict Bridgerton and Sophie Beckett, however, left much to be desired. In this adaptation of the Cinderella fairy tale, Sophie is the bastard daughter of an earl. After her father's death, she's forced to slave as a servant for her evil stepmother and two stepsisters (one of whom isn't quite as evil as the other). She gets one night of reprieve from her life of servile drudgery and sneaks off to a masked ball. There she meets Benedict and they fall in love instantly. Nothing too exciting there. It's all very sweet I guess, but their big moment together really didn't grab me. She can't reveal her identity to him and runs away at the stroke of midnight. So that we can have a story, she keeps this secret, even after a serendipitous reunion with Benedict two years later. He saves her from a group of evil, drunken louts and gradually falls in love with what he thinks is a servant. The plot and their relationship revolve around Sophie guarding the secret of her identity like her life depends on it. It was mildly frustrating to me. As was the blandness of the hero. He complains about no one knowing who he truly is, of being known only as a Bridgerton, or simply "Number Two" among his many siblings. Sadly, he never manages to show the reader who he is - there's something about his being an artist thrown in, but nothing's really done with it. Being paired with such a nondescript heroine didn't help him much either. As a Cinderella retelling, An Offer from a Gentleman was disappointing. Sophie was more Disney than Drew Barrymore, and her climactic triumph over the stepmother left me unmoved. (Though I thought Benedict's mother was very cute in rushing to Sophie's rescue.) The stepmother herself was one-dimensional, as was the righteous, long-suffering Sophie. It seemed that the author was trying hard to give Sophie some spunk while under her stepmother's thumb, but it never rang true and I could tell where the story was going from the first page. I’ll still be reading more of Julia Quinn, if only to try and see what makes her so popular, but I couldn’t get into this third installment of her Bridgerton series.more
Another solid instalment in this series. I liked Benedict, he's the only family member that I had found totally unmemorable - but this fits well with his character as he has sides he hides from his family. Sophie grabbed at my heart form her first scene, waiting for her step family to arrive.This manages to be a fluffy romance, a retelling of a the Cinderella story, and the third book in a regency series, and yet it is still fresh. I was not entirely comfortable with Benedict's insistence that Sophie be his mistress, but I fell for his apology.more
This was the first book I ever read by Julia Quinn. It not only introduced me to the Bridgerton genre, but to historical romances, of which I am now an addict. This is a Cinderella-esque story about a woman who grows up serving her stepmother and stepsisters. She sneaks out to a ball and meets Benedict Bridgerton, of the famed Bridgerton family. Two years pass, with her working as a servant and a chance encounter with Benedict renews the relationship. Sophie is a great heroine who overcomes her upbringing and refuses to allow choices to be made for her. Quinn also makes it completely believable that Benedict doesn't recognize Sophie as the same woman he met at the ball.more
This is a cute retelling of "Cinderella" - Julia Quinn style. Sophie is the sweet, abused Cinderella character, complete with the wicked stepmother and evil stepsisters. She's dressed up by loyal servants to have one evening at a ball - from which she must return by midnight - and at that ball falls in love with Prince Charming - Benedict Bridgerton. It's cute to see this story played out in Regency England, and with our beloved Bridgertons. Unlike in Cinderella, though, things don't go "happily ever after" quite so easy. For one thing, Benedict doesn't even recognize her when they first meet again - much to Sophie's dismay. I enjoyed this book a great deal!more
An Offer from a Gentleman by Julia QuinnThe Bridgerton family is wealthy, well born, and universally admired. And with six of the eight Bridgerton children already mingling with society, it's no wonder they're mentioned so frequently in the most popular (and accurate) source of social news, Lady Whistledown's Society Papers. But not even the mysterious Lady Whistledown can identify the masked maiden who completely captivated the Bridgerton second son, Benedict, at his mother's masquerade ball -- a silver-clad beauty who vanished on the stroke of midnight. It was a magical night for Sophie Beckett, orphaned, illegitimate daughter of the Earl of Penwood. Attending the ball was a beautiful dream, sharing the evening with Benedict Bridgerton was the stuff of fantasy -- and returning home to her role as unpaid servant to her father's cruel widow and stepdaughters was a nightmare. Then she lost even the small security of that position, and things went from bad to worse. By the time Sophie met Benedict again, she was in truly desperate straits. He made her feel precious, even in rags, but Sophie had grave reservations about accepting.I really enjoyed this addition to the Bridgerton family saga.At last, I had characters who didn't have to marry because the woman had been compromised, and in fact, it looked like they wouldn't be able to marry at all for most of the book.Despite it probably being inappropriate for a modern woman to say so, the whole Cinderella-story works for me. And this is very clearly a telling of the Cinderella story, complete with an evil stepmother, stepsisters and a suitably handsome prince in Benedict. At the same time, Quinn doesn't let the fairy-tale direction of her story overcome the setting she has chosen to use.The title comes from Benedict's not-exactly-honourable offer to Sophie that she become his mistress. Not perhaps what one immediately wants in a romantic hero, but given their positions and the society they live in, exactly what a gentleman in his position would do. Sophie's reasons for refusing are sensible and certain and the story unfolds as they try to find their own balance and resolution.Of course, there is a happy ending. Perhaps the way it comes about is a little too pat, but not by much. I can easily imagine Violet Bridgerton "convincing" Sophie's stepmother to do pretty much anything she wished, and the hero and heroine are engaging to the reader, so that I wanted them to get their happy ever after in true fairy tale fashion.A fun read.An Offer From a GentlemanBridgertons, Book 3Julia Quinn7/10more
i loved loved loved this cinderella-esque story. the ball at the beginning is totally worth reading over and over.more
An Offer is both a Bridgerton story and a Cinderella retelling. While I'm very fond of the Bridgerton series in general, I find this story, in particular, flawed. Benedict uses the power structures of his misogynist and classist society to seduce Sophie: he tells her that if she leaves him he'll falsely accuse her of theft and have her transported to Australia; he forcibly installs her in his mother's house as a servant; he takes advantage of his position of a son of the house to repeatedly accost her against her will. That he and his family are benevolent, and that Sophie loves him, are ultimately less important to me than the abuse of power he uses to gain her love.Ironically, in a book by a less skilled author I'd not have judged the power imbalance (very common in Regency romances) so harshly. But the Bridgerton series rarely resorts to this tired old trope: the forceful hero persuades the heroine that lust means true love.more
yo soy española y el libro es de otra lengua lo kiero leer?????soy una fanática de la lectutamore
Amazing read!more
Not my fav of her books. I don't like how Benedict continues to push Sophie to be his mistress. He never seems to get a clue about the impact to her life.more
Touching love story. Very well written, with likable H&H as well as secondary characters, along with dis-likable villainous characters. A story guaranteed to stirs the emotions of the incurable romantic.more
Lovely Cinderella story, Sophie the heroine is charming and the hero is delectable. Love this series.more
I adore Benedict! I appreciated the plot. it was Cinderella with a wicked twist. first JQ book I ever read and I've been a fan ever sincemore
it's a great book
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another cinderellamore
It started with so much promise, the plot and dialogue were quite good and the characters intriguing, minding me much of the movie 'Ever After,' but then they are both retellings of the Cinderella story. But then the plot became predictable and the characters showed themselves to be quite without, 'character.' If this is the modern idea of a 'hero' and 'love,' then we had all best take Hamlet's advice and get ourselves to a nunnery. While there are several references to the works of Miss Austen and Baroness Orczy, the closest this book gets to such vital characters are the names. The heroine is accidentally referred to as 'Miss Bennet,' in one scene and she minds me much of Kitty Bennet in her wish-washy evaluation of life, the universe, and everything. She is praised for 'standing up for what she believes in.' except that she doesn't really believe in anything and also fails to stand up for it. She annoys me, but I really wanted to thump the gentleman! How can he profess to love her and be portrayed as everything good and heroic when he has not the heart to either marry the girl or live with his disappointment, instead he wants all the convenience of her body and affections yet none of the bother of doing what is right and proper by his beloved? And then she puts up with it, repeatedly! And then she gives into him on several occasions only to reaffirm her determination not to give in! She acts more like an addict than a sensible woman in love, but then love can make fools of the best of us. The lady likes novels, I would highly recommend anything by Jane Austen or maybe 'Jane Eyre,' 'Les Miserables,' 'A Tale of Two Cities,' or even 'The Merry Wives of Windsor;' she could learn much about what true love, character, and devotion look like. I haven't read anything this insipid since the 'The Three Musketeers,' which is another puzzle in itself. It started out so well, but I was quite disappointed. Go watch 'Ever After,' if you need a Cinderella fix.more
hellow po ate wla po bng tagalog ntong story nosebleed akoh ehh ang ganda sana ng title nyo at im sure ang ganda rin ng storyang ito pwo na nosebleed po akoh ehh?_? ang sakit na nga ng ulo koh ...
nagtanung lng ako po... kng Mrng tagalog hihihihihihih tyms po?more
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