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From the Publisher

"The First R. Austin Freeman Megapack" collects 27 mystery tales featuring the forensic sleuth Dr. Thorndyke (and others). Included in this volume are:


THE RED THUMB MARK (1907)

THE MAN WITH THE NAILED SHOES (1909)

THE STRANGER'S LATCHKEY (1909)

THE ANTHROPOLOGIST AT LARGE (1909)

THE BLUE SEQUIN (1909)

THE MOABITE CIPHER (1909)

THE MANDARIN'S PEARL (1909)

THE ALUMINIUM DAGGER (1909)

A MESSAGE FROM THE DEEP SEA (1909)

THE EYE OF OSIRIS (1911)

THE MYSTERY OF 31 NEW INN (1912)

THE CASE OF OSCAR BRODSKI (1912)

A CASE OF PREMEDITATION (1912)

THE ECHO OF A MUTINY (1912)

A WASTREL'S ROMANCE (1912)

THE OLD LAG (1912)

THE UTTERMOST FARTHING (1914)

A SILENT WITNESS (1914)

THE GREAT PORTRAIT MYSTERY (1918)

THE BRONZE PARROT (1918)

POWDER BLUE AND HAWTHORN (1918)

THE ATTORNEY'S CONSCIENCE (1918)

THE LUCK OF BARNABAS MUDGE (1918)

THE MISSING MORTGAGEE (1918)

PERCIVAL BLAND'S PROXY (1918)

THE CASE OF THE WHITE FOOTPRINTS (1920)

HELEN VARDON'S CONFESSION (1922)


If you enjoy this volume, please search this ebook store for "Wildside Megapack" to see more entries in the series, collecting great tales of adventure, mystery, science fiction, westerns, ghost stories, and much more. (Sort by publication date to see the most recent additions.)

Published: Wildside Press on
ISBN: 9781479401895
List price: $0.99
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