Reader reviews for A Series of Unfortunate Events #2: The Reptile Room

Great book! Can't put it down.
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These book is the second part of the Baudelaire adventure. They are moved into a museum with there uncle and that is when things get interesting.I recommend this book to children who liked the first book.
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The refined cadence of "Lemony Snicket's" telling of the misfortunes of the Baudelaire children pulls the Series of Unfortunate Events above the mass of quaint children's tales by author's who end up talking down to kids because they assume that they're deaf to wit and prose more sophisticated than picture book captions._The Reptile Room_ is a great example of black humor--a balance of slapstick and wit combined with some frankly darkly disturbing images--there's more than one murder, and while Count Olaf and his cohorts may be physically cartoonish, there's an unmistakable threat of quite ghoulish and very *un*-amusing malice lurking throughout the story (Count Olaf definitely doesn't use his gleaming knife to butter his toast). The story is peppered with images that, while definitely ridiculous (the attributes of the snakes in Uncle Monty's menagerie, for example), are wry rather than silly.I also appreciate the physical qualities of the book--a nice little hardcover, a font that's easy on the eyes but not bland, a few nicely calculated line drawings along the margins here and there; I liked holding it, turning the pages.The formula for the Series of Unfortunate Events is pretty much the same--our heroes think they've gotten away, the villain returns, the heroes almost succumb to his dark scenes, but in the end they save the day, though the villain manages to escape--so there's no mystery about what's going to happen here. But it's a classic formula, and Mr. Snicket works it well; the fun is in getting there, even though we know pretty much where we're going. Smart and fun, and very much enjoyed. Four stars.
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This is the 2nd book in the tales of the Baudelaire children, also known as "A Series of Unfortunate Events". After escaping from Count Olaf's clutched in the "The Bad Beginning", Mr. Poe has placed the children with an uncle in the nearby country side. For a change the children actually enjoy their time with Uncle Monty. But Count Olaf promised to get their fortune if it was the last thing he did and he tries to make good on the promise. Do the Baudelaire's succeed in thwarting him? You'll have to read to find out.This is anther great book in the series, a little darker than the last one and gets a little meaner in the middle but I think it was a better book than the first one overall.
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Lemony Snicket is extremely talented. I loved his writing style, especially when he would take time to explain the meaning of words. The covers are beautiful and the stories are interesting. It's just that these books really are just a series of unfortunate events. Nothing good ever seems to happen to these children. I read the first few books and decided not to go on.
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Summary: The Baudelair's after a not so bright beginning are off to Uncle Monty's and his reptile room. But will it really end well? What do you think?Review: I will never go near a snake ever again!! I don't care if that snake is poisonous or not it's scary enough for me to stay away from them for a LONG while.
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Generally it was a good book, But it's not the best one I have read.
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OMG, I've not stopped giggling since starting this. Uncle Montgomery's voice... I
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I absolutely loved this book! The first book in the series was great, but this book surpasses it; it was absolutely incredible! The author is phenomenal, and the narrator is fantastic! The humor appeals to audiences both young and old and story is great through and through!
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In this book, the second in the Lemony Snicket's "A Series of Unfortunate Events," the reader finds the Baudelaire children - Violet, Klaus, and Sunny - trying to resume a semi-normal life after escaping from the clutches of evil Count Olaf. They are taken in by Dr. Montgomery Montgomery - fondly called Uncle Monty - an esteemed herpetologist and, seemingly, an infinitely better caregiver than Count Olaf. But what starts out as a promising situation for the Baudelaires eventually becomes - yes - a series of unfortunate events, caused by a much-too familiar face.The characters in this book, and particularly the Baudelaires, are defined by what they do and how they act - Violet is the inventor, Klaus is the reader, and Sunny is the biter, just like Mr. Poe is the coughing banker with the hanky and Uncle Monty is friendly and caring. The characters are also defined by their interactions with each other. This book has a primarily linear plotline, with occasional shifts back to the Baudelaries' life with their parents or Count Olaf. There is certainly a central climax and a central question to be answered - will the children remain safe after their very, very unfortunate events? The theme of this book largely centers on good vs. evil, and how people are either good or evil - not in between. The Reptile Room also deals with the importance of family, even if it is an unconventional family unit - such as the Baudelaire orphans alone, or with their adopted Uncle Monty. Also, the knowledge of children or young adults - and that this knowledge often surpasses that of grown-ups - is a central idea to the "solution" to the Baudelaires' unfortunate events. The setting is in a distant, but not *entirely* unrealistic land, but real places - like Peru - are mentioned. The text is laid out in chapter form.In regards to the culture of The Reptile Room, Snicket's creation is a world where knowledge and learning are very important, but where children are often better seen than heard - at least by the adults. That the children themselves finally solve the mystery of "Stefano" - or at least inform those around them who Stefano really is - is a credit to the intelligence of children and a rejection of the idea that they should be polite and unquestioning. Furthermore, because of the important roles the siblings play in each others' lives - and then the brief, but significant role Uncle Monty plays in theirs - family connections are also a cultural marker.Even without having read the first book on the Baudelaires, I thoroughly enjoyed listening to this book and did not want to stop! The audiobook narrator - Tim Curry - was fantastic, and the author's humor was quite a treat. This seems like a book that both genders, from early elementary school through middle school, would enjoy.
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