Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

A duke must choose wisely . . .

Leopold Dautry, the notorious Duke of Villiers, must wed quickly and nobly—and his choices, alas, are few. The Duke of Montague's daughter, Eleanor, is exquisitely beautiful and fiercely intelligent. Villiers betroths himself to her without further ado.

After all, no other woman really qualifies. Lisette, the outspoken daughter of the Duke of Gilner, cares nothing for clothing or decorum. She's engaged to another man, and doesn't give a fig for status or title. Half the ton believes Lisette mad—and Villiers is inclined to agree.

Torn between logic and passion, between intelligence and imagination, Villiers finds himself drawn to the very edge of impropriety. But it is not until he's in a duel to the death, fighting for the reputation of the woman he loves, that Villiers finally realizes that the greatest risk may not be in the dueling field . . .

But in the bedroom. And the heart.

Topics: Georgian Era, Series, Orphans, Illegitimate Children, Spinsters, and London

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061976049
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for A Duke of Her Own
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
This book should have never happened.

After reading some 350 odd pages of this book, I must come to that conclusion.

The Villiers I recall from previous James books would never be so moronic. The Villiers I recall is intelligent, crafty, witty and an utter snob. The Villiers I recall is incisively perceptive and strategic, enough to be one of the premier chess players in the country.

Having said that, it is a virtual impossibility that Villiers would be even temporarily fooled into thinking that Lissette was anything more than an off the rocker, spoiled brat. The fact that he would even consider her made me utterly confused. It was so clear that she was absolutely ridiculous to everyone. And it didn't make sense to me that Villiers was so set on marrying her when it became clearer and clearer that she was an absolute horror.

I just didn't get it.more
In the last of the series is really about a desperate Duke. The Duke of Villiers has started investigating the whereabouts of his illegitimate children and bringing them to live with him on his estate, he quickly realises he needs a wife who will accept and mother his children and bring them into society and only the daughter of a duke will do. There are two possible candidates, Eleanor, who's already proclaimed that she will only marry a duke and Lisette, who's rumoured to be mad. I was annoyed by Villier's prevarication and Lisette as a character is just downright annoying, but this was a satisfying ending to the series/more
There was only one thing that bothered me a bit about this book. SPOILER ALERT!!The premise that the Duke initially chose Lissette over Eleanor was the the former really didn't care about his childrens' parentage and would thus be a good mother to them. At no stage did Eleanor comment that she had an issue with the children - she clearly didn't. Lisette's character was much too immature to deal with society as the mother of six illegitimate children, whereas Eleanor clearly was not. This irked me a bit since James' novels (from the two I've read, which isn't many, I grant you) seem to have strong, sensible characters, both men and women. Still, a really enjoyable read!more
The only reason I give this book 4 stars and not 5 is because the beginning was just so horribly boring. I picked it up and as I started reading, but I just couldn't get into it after 10 or so pages, so I started more or less just skimming pages to see if I even wanted to keep going. Then, somewhere around page 50 a passage caught my eye and from that moment I literally could not put the book down. The only problem was that I had started reading it at just after midnight and by was 4am by the time I was done. That being said, it was one of the best romances I've ever read.Neither the hero or heroine were over the top, but they had a real quality about them that you could easily identify with. With all the characters actually, even the more minor ones. I also found the plot to be refreshing and different than what I've read before. This is one of those books where everybody had their own issues and they all happened to be in the same place at the same time, but nothing that happened seemed out of place either. There were no easy conveniences for the sake of getting to the end, it all played out and felt like you were really there watching everything unfold.This is my first book by Eloisa James, and I am not disappointed, I will definitely read some more of her work.more
This is the third book in this series that I've read, and I've enjoyed them all. This would be my favourite, as it's always good to see the rogue of another story (or two) finally fall in love. Very satisfying.more
Leopold Dautry, the duke of Villiers, has a serious problem. He’s just realized that his six bastard children are not in the reliable schools that he thought, but rather shoved off into the cheapest places possible so that his soliciter can keep all his money. While he sets about finding his children, he knows that he needs a noble wife to help him introduce them into society and keep them in his house. He needs the daughter of a duke, which leaves him two choices, Eleanor, the daughter of the duke of Montague, and Lisette, the daughter of the duke of Gilner. Eleanor is beautiful and makes him laugh, but Lisette, while considered mad, cares nothing for society’s dictates and adores children. Villiers must make a difficult choice between them in order to find the woman who will not only be the mother of his children but the companion of his dreams.This is the sixth entry in Eloisa James’s Desperate Duchesses series, and while knowledge of what’s gone before would help, I think this one actually does a great job standing on its own. This is because it’s focused directly on the couple at hand and their relationship is all new. While Villers’ character has been brilliantly developed over the course of these six novels, this one builds enough on that to make it stand alone, particularly when he finally falls in love. And it’s all done in Eloisa James’s witty, clear prose, which immediately draws me in and won’t let me stop reading.I hestitate to spoil exactly which woman Villiers falls in love with, although it is somewhat obvious from page one. If you’d like to read this without any indication of what’s going to happen, please stop reading now! The back cover is right in that he chooses between logic and passion. He believes for a while that Lisette would be a perfect choice for his children. She likes to play with them and she ignores society completely; but what he doesn’t see (and what is fairly obvious to the reader) is that she is like a child herself and as such would be completely incapable of caring for them. I’m not sure what’s meant to be wrong with her, but it certainly doesn’t make her an appropriate mother and wife.Eleanor, on the other hand, is an amazing heroine. Having set her heart aside for her childhood love, who also happens to be a duke, Eleanor declared long ago that only a duke would do. If her love was forced to marry someone else, she would remain true to him. After a number of years, however, Eleanor is lonely, and wishes she hadn’t issued that silly statement. At this point, a duke appears on the horizon, searching for a wife, and almost immediately Villiers and Eleanor strike a deal. Watching them become friends after that and then fall in love is a beautiful thing. It’s made even more so by the fact that Eleanor believes – and at times I believed even though I knew this had to have a HEA – that he is going to choose Lisette. They can’t help loving each other because they genuinely like each other, and in my opinion the fact that they have both this and the chemistry going on is a wonderful achievement.This book was for me the capstone on a series that has turned out to be wonderful. At first consumed with too many secondary characters, by the fourth book they begin to come into their own and steal the show. Over the series, I have grown to love Villiers most of all, and this is the perfect ending for him. I can’t recommend A Duke of Her Own enough. I kind of wish I could read it for the first time all over again.more
I had not read any of Eloisa James' books prior to reading her newest Duchess book, "A Duke of Her Own", this past week. If this book is an indication of James' other books - particularly her Duchess series - then I deserve a kick for not picking up her books before this. In "A Duke of Her Own", Leopold Dautry, the Duke of Villiers, needs to marry - and marry nobly. Since his options only include daughters of dukes, he's limited in his choices - Eleanor, the beautiful and intelligent daughter of the Duke of Montague, or Lisette, the beautiful and free spirited daughter of the Duke of Gilner? From what I gather reading this book and excerpts from previous Duchess books, Villiers is a notorious scoundrel who appears in each of the previous Duchess books. I hope all of the heroes in the other Duchess books are as delicious as Villiers. I can't wait to scoop up the rest of this series.more
Read all 7 reviews

Reviews

This book should have never happened.

After reading some 350 odd pages of this book, I must come to that conclusion.

The Villiers I recall from previous James books would never be so moronic. The Villiers I recall is intelligent, crafty, witty and an utter snob. The Villiers I recall is incisively perceptive and strategic, enough to be one of the premier chess players in the country.

Having said that, it is a virtual impossibility that Villiers would be even temporarily fooled into thinking that Lissette was anything more than an off the rocker, spoiled brat. The fact that he would even consider her made me utterly confused. It was so clear that she was absolutely ridiculous to everyone. And it didn't make sense to me that Villiers was so set on marrying her when it became clearer and clearer that she was an absolute horror.

I just didn't get it.more
In the last of the series is really about a desperate Duke. The Duke of Villiers has started investigating the whereabouts of his illegitimate children and bringing them to live with him on his estate, he quickly realises he needs a wife who will accept and mother his children and bring them into society and only the daughter of a duke will do. There are two possible candidates, Eleanor, who's already proclaimed that she will only marry a duke and Lisette, who's rumoured to be mad. I was annoyed by Villier's prevarication and Lisette as a character is just downright annoying, but this was a satisfying ending to the series/more
There was only one thing that bothered me a bit about this book. SPOILER ALERT!!The premise that the Duke initially chose Lissette over Eleanor was the the former really didn't care about his childrens' parentage and would thus be a good mother to them. At no stage did Eleanor comment that she had an issue with the children - she clearly didn't. Lisette's character was much too immature to deal with society as the mother of six illegitimate children, whereas Eleanor clearly was not. This irked me a bit since James' novels (from the two I've read, which isn't many, I grant you) seem to have strong, sensible characters, both men and women. Still, a really enjoyable read!more
The only reason I give this book 4 stars and not 5 is because the beginning was just so horribly boring. I picked it up and as I started reading, but I just couldn't get into it after 10 or so pages, so I started more or less just skimming pages to see if I even wanted to keep going. Then, somewhere around page 50 a passage caught my eye and from that moment I literally could not put the book down. The only problem was that I had started reading it at just after midnight and by was 4am by the time I was done. That being said, it was one of the best romances I've ever read.Neither the hero or heroine were over the top, but they had a real quality about them that you could easily identify with. With all the characters actually, even the more minor ones. I also found the plot to be refreshing and different than what I've read before. This is one of those books where everybody had their own issues and they all happened to be in the same place at the same time, but nothing that happened seemed out of place either. There were no easy conveniences for the sake of getting to the end, it all played out and felt like you were really there watching everything unfold.This is my first book by Eloisa James, and I am not disappointed, I will definitely read some more of her work.more
This is the third book in this series that I've read, and I've enjoyed them all. This would be my favourite, as it's always good to see the rogue of another story (or two) finally fall in love. Very satisfying.more
Leopold Dautry, the duke of Villiers, has a serious problem. He’s just realized that his six bastard children are not in the reliable schools that he thought, but rather shoved off into the cheapest places possible so that his soliciter can keep all his money. While he sets about finding his children, he knows that he needs a noble wife to help him introduce them into society and keep them in his house. He needs the daughter of a duke, which leaves him two choices, Eleanor, the daughter of the duke of Montague, and Lisette, the daughter of the duke of Gilner. Eleanor is beautiful and makes him laugh, but Lisette, while considered mad, cares nothing for society’s dictates and adores children. Villiers must make a difficult choice between them in order to find the woman who will not only be the mother of his children but the companion of his dreams.This is the sixth entry in Eloisa James’s Desperate Duchesses series, and while knowledge of what’s gone before would help, I think this one actually does a great job standing on its own. This is because it’s focused directly on the couple at hand and their relationship is all new. While Villers’ character has been brilliantly developed over the course of these six novels, this one builds enough on that to make it stand alone, particularly when he finally falls in love. And it’s all done in Eloisa James’s witty, clear prose, which immediately draws me in and won’t let me stop reading.I hestitate to spoil exactly which woman Villiers falls in love with, although it is somewhat obvious from page one. If you’d like to read this without any indication of what’s going to happen, please stop reading now! The back cover is right in that he chooses between logic and passion. He believes for a while that Lisette would be a perfect choice for his children. She likes to play with them and she ignores society completely; but what he doesn’t see (and what is fairly obvious to the reader) is that she is like a child herself and as such would be completely incapable of caring for them. I’m not sure what’s meant to be wrong with her, but it certainly doesn’t make her an appropriate mother and wife.Eleanor, on the other hand, is an amazing heroine. Having set her heart aside for her childhood love, who also happens to be a duke, Eleanor declared long ago that only a duke would do. If her love was forced to marry someone else, she would remain true to him. After a number of years, however, Eleanor is lonely, and wishes she hadn’t issued that silly statement. At this point, a duke appears on the horizon, searching for a wife, and almost immediately Villiers and Eleanor strike a deal. Watching them become friends after that and then fall in love is a beautiful thing. It’s made even more so by the fact that Eleanor believes – and at times I believed even though I knew this had to have a HEA – that he is going to choose Lisette. They can’t help loving each other because they genuinely like each other, and in my opinion the fact that they have both this and the chemistry going on is a wonderful achievement.This book was for me the capstone on a series that has turned out to be wonderful. At first consumed with too many secondary characters, by the fourth book they begin to come into their own and steal the show. Over the series, I have grown to love Villiers most of all, and this is the perfect ending for him. I can’t recommend A Duke of Her Own enough. I kind of wish I could read it for the first time all over again.more
I had not read any of Eloisa James' books prior to reading her newest Duchess book, "A Duke of Her Own", this past week. If this book is an indication of James' other books - particularly her Duchess series - then I deserve a kick for not picking up her books before this. In "A Duke of Her Own", Leopold Dautry, the Duke of Villiers, needs to marry - and marry nobly. Since his options only include daughters of dukes, he's limited in his choices - Eleanor, the beautiful and intelligent daughter of the Duke of Montague, or Lisette, the beautiful and free spirited daughter of the Duke of Gilner? From what I gather reading this book and excerpts from previous Duchess books, Villiers is a notorious scoundrel who appears in each of the previous Duchess books. I hope all of the heroes in the other Duchess books are as delicious as Villiers. I can't wait to scoop up the rest of this series.more
Load more
scribd