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From Roger Rosenblatt, author of the bestsellers Making Toast and Unless It Moves the Human Heart, comes a moving meditation on the passages of grief, the solace of solitude, and the redemptive power of love

In Making Toast, Roger Rosenblatt shared the story of his family in the days and months after the death of his thirty-eight-year-old daughter, Amy. Now, in Kayak Morning, he offers a personal meditation on grief itself. “Everybody grieves,” he writes. From that terse, melancholy observation emerges a work of art that addresses the universal experience of loss.

On a quiet Sunday morning, two and a half years after Amy’s death, Roger heads out in his kayak. He observes,“You can’t always make your way in the world by moving up. Or down, for that matter. Boats move laterally on water, which levels everything. It is one of the two great levelers.” Part elegy, part quest, Kayak Morning explores Roger’s years as a journalist, the comforts of literature, and the value of solitude, poignantly reminding us that grief is not apart from life but encompasses it. In recalling to us what we have lost, grief by necessity resurrects what we have had.

Published: HarperCollins on Jan 3, 2012
ISBN: 9780062084040
List price: $8.99
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In a lot of ways, this is a continuation of his meditations that began in "Making Toast". Rosenblatt is still deeply mourning his beloved daughter, now gone for a few years. He cannot shake his grief and anger, except, these days, as he paddles the creek behind his house in his one man kayak. He ponders things large and small out on the water, taking on memories and dreams with the same ease he watches the fish flitting around him, or the deer taking a drink from the creek, or the smudges on the windows at the back of his house. He uses the solitary hours to sort through himself, still trying to find a way to live with a sorrow that will not got away, trying to find room for the love and joy his life still offers. His pain jumps off the page, you cannot help but feel it yourself. However, this book did not make me sad, only thoughtful, thinking of people I've lost and remembering the parts of them I still have with me, making me a better person for having known them if but briefly.read more
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Reviews

In a lot of ways, this is a continuation of his meditations that began in "Making Toast". Rosenblatt is still deeply mourning his beloved daughter, now gone for a few years. He cannot shake his grief and anger, except, these days, as he paddles the creek behind his house in his one man kayak. He ponders things large and small out on the water, taking on memories and dreams with the same ease he watches the fish flitting around him, or the deer taking a drink from the creek, or the smudges on the windows at the back of his house. He uses the solitary hours to sort through himself, still trying to find a way to live with a sorrow that will not got away, trying to find room for the love and joy his life still offers. His pain jumps off the page, you cannot help but feel it yourself. However, this book did not make me sad, only thoughtful, thinking of people I've lost and remembering the parts of them I still have with me, making me a better person for having known them if but briefly.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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