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Arendt describes the loss of meaning of the traditional key words of politics: justice, reason, responsibility, virtue, glory. Through a series of eight exercises, she shows how we can redistill once more the vital essence of these concepts.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Published: Penguin Group on Sep 26, 2006
ISBN: 9781101662656
List price: $13.99
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This is an aptly named collection of essays on history, politics and culture. The author seems to have been a full-blooded representative of early 20th century German philosophy, fluent in ancient Greek and incredibly versed in the classics. In the first three or four essays I was a bit annoyed by her constant referrals to Plato (with Hegel as the sidekick), but that's mostly a question of personal preference. The following essays on education and mass culture were less dependent on Plato. But the essay on Truth and Politics was by far the most interesting one to me. The author's real-life experience with totalitarian politics clearly contributes to her analysis of political truth an understanding which is absent from modern political theory. All in all this is a deep book which offers a lot to think about.read more
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Arendt never ceases to impress me with the depth and clarity of her thought. Recommended to all.read more
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Another excellent contribution by Hannah Arendt. comprised of eight essays dealing with the modern concept of history, political authority and its decline in the modern world, freedom, education, culture, politics and space exploration.To touch on just two of the above, the essay on freedom discusses how the ancient and explicitly political concept of freedom, which held that freedom existed only among men [sic], was gradually replaced by concepts drawn from philosophical and religious experience that affirmed freedom as a sort of sanctuary away from the interference and influence of others. Freedom thus became a feature of thought and perhaps individual behaviour, rather than of political action. The essay on authority is apropos in Canada right now, as we re-evaluate the role of the Senate. Arendt argues that all modern concepts of authority are derivations of the ancient Greek efforts to work out what authority meant, and they in turn drew theres from two essentially anti-political relationships: that of the master to his slave, and that of the head of house to his family. By contrast, only the Romans, Arendt argues, had a genuinely political concept of authority, which for them (as for some later, e.g. Machiavelli) was explicitly tied to the act of founding (the political act par excellence) and augmenting that foundation.read more
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This is an aptly named collection of essays on history, politics and culture. The author seems to have been a full-blooded representative of early 20th century German philosophy, fluent in ancient Greek and incredibly versed in the classics. In the first three or four essays I was a bit annoyed by her constant referrals to Plato (with Hegel as the sidekick), but that's mostly a question of personal preference. The following essays on education and mass culture were less dependent on Plato. But the essay on Truth and Politics was by far the most interesting one to me. The author's real-life experience with totalitarian politics clearly contributes to her analysis of political truth an understanding which is absent from modern political theory. All in all this is a deep book which offers a lot to think about.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Arendt never ceases to impress me with the depth and clarity of her thought. Recommended to all.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another excellent contribution by Hannah Arendt. comprised of eight essays dealing with the modern concept of history, political authority and its decline in the modern world, freedom, education, culture, politics and space exploration.To touch on just two of the above, the essay on freedom discusses how the ancient and explicitly political concept of freedom, which held that freedom existed only among men [sic], was gradually replaced by concepts drawn from philosophical and religious experience that affirmed freedom as a sort of sanctuary away from the interference and influence of others. Freedom thus became a feature of thought and perhaps individual behaviour, rather than of political action. The essay on authority is apropos in Canada right now, as we re-evaluate the role of the Senate. Arendt argues that all modern concepts of authority are derivations of the ancient Greek efforts to work out what authority meant, and they in turn drew theres from two essentially anti-political relationships: that of the master to his slave, and that of the head of house to his family. By contrast, only the Romans, Arendt argues, had a genuinely political concept of authority, which for them (as for some later, e.g. Machiavelli) was explicitly tied to the act of founding (the political act par excellence) and augmenting that foundation.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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