Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Lauren Oliver's powerful New York Times bestselling novel Delirium—the first in a dystopian trilogy—presents a world as terrifying as George Orwell's 1984 and a romance as true as Romeo & Juliet.

In an alternate United States, love has been declared a dangerous disease, and the government forces everyone who reaches eighteen to have a procedure called the Cure. Living with her aunt, uncle, and cousins in Portland, Maine, Lena Haloway is very much looking forward to being cured and living a safe, predictable life. She watched love destroy her mother and isn't about to make the same mistakes.

But with ninety-five days left until her treatment, Lena meets enigmatic Alex, a boy from the Wilds who lives under the government's radar. What will happen if they do the unthinkable and fall in love?

Delirium received starred reviews from Kirkus and School Library Journal, and was named a Best Book of the Year by USA Today, Kirkus, Amazon.com, YALSA, and the Chicago Public Library and was selected as one of NPR's Top 100 Best Ever Teen Novels.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Topics: Dystopia, Maine, Speculative Fiction, Trilogy, Adventurous, Futuristic, Dramatic, Love, Love Story, First Love, Rebellion, Forbidden Love, Escaping Oppression, Friendship, Family, Suspenseful, On the Run, Female Friendship, Courage, Unrequited Love, Survival, Coming of Age, Death, Female Protagonist, and First in a Series

Published: HarperCollins on Aug 2, 2011
ISBN: 9780062114037
List price: $5.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Delirium
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

I live delarium. What an amazing concept.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
amazing and beautiful written. I grew a strong connection to the characters and this book is one of my favorites !read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
my best frends mum just got a nearly new Mazda MAZDA3 Hatchback only from working part-time off a pc at home... go to this web-site >> T­­­­­­­i­­­­­­­m­­­­­­­e­­­­­­­-­­­­­­­J­­­­­­­o­­­­­­­b­­­­­­­s­­­­­­­3­­­­­­­4­­­­­­.c­­­­o­­­­mread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved this book!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is beautiful , beautiful , it will change the way you view loveread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
amo este libroooo ❤read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Nice storyline. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I absolutely love this book. It is the story of a world where love is a disease. This book shows the meaning of life and everything that comes with it including the good and the bad. This book is definitely one of my favorites, and I recommend it to anyone no matter what type of books they're in to. Especially if you want a good cry.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
a thrilling story that keeps you begging for more with every sentenceread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read it!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Starts out really far fetched, to the point where I started reading, put it down for a week, then decided to give it another chance, and boy am I glad I did. However it almost wants you to take notes cause it gets hard to follow but good reed read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Incredible!! I loved the idea of Love as a disease and Lena was wonderful!! The way she realizes everything.....its incredible read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Slow to start- but turned into one of my favorite trilogies!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Some pages are messing in the ebook. Please fix this, it makes the story unreadable.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
amazing!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Absolutely Loved this series- like seriously- it must become a movie!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I fell for this book pretty hard when it first came out. The other 2 lost steam, but I think that was just because it went in a direction I hated. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The thought of the book is interesting but the texts did not give justice of the idea for the book. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is so awesome!!! I got so many people at school to read it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you liked the Hunger Games, or Maze Runner series, you will like this book. Lena lives in a society where love is forbidden. At 18 all citizens undergo a "procedure" rendering them cured of the delirium that causes a person to love another. Since love is the root of all troubles and problems in the world, the society can be well ordered. Lena fall in love before the procedure takes place, however.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
To sum up Delirium in one word: Breathtaking. An absolutely fantastic dystopian story that may go on to be as good as the Hunger Games, in my opinion. While there isn't too much action in the begininning, Oliver takes time to build up the story and develop the atmosphere of the world that Lena lives in. Delirium is a wonderful and convincing love story that stole my heart.Lena starts off as a meek, easily controlled girl but once she meets Alex, she starts to become who she was meant to be. While at first she thinks that the operation to destroy the "deadly disease" of love is necessary, she soon begins to think otherwise. Her first encounter with Alex steals the breath right out of her and she realizes that Alex could mean trouble for her. The more she and Alex see each other, the more daring she becomes. Soon she doesn't even care that she is showing all the symptoms of deliria; all that matters now is that she and Alex be together. Through all of the thrilling experiences that Lena goes on, she is changed into a strong woman who is madly in love and will do anything to keep that love forever.Alex is a flirtatious and fun guy who takes Lena out of her comfort zone. He helps Lena to see the disturbing truth about the society they live in and brings out the best in Lena. The chemistry between him and Lena gave me butterflies and made me want an Alex, too. There are just so many wonderful guys in YA novels that I wish were real! Alex is a sweetheart towards Lena and he has so many wonderful qualities to him. His teasing remarks to Lena were too cute! I also liked that Alex had a mysterious side to him, too, and that there is more to him than meets the eye.I loved each and every page of Delirium and I feel sad that I have finished it. Delirium, like most dystopian novels, has a huge cliff-hanger and I will go crazy waiting for the next installment in this series. Delirium is a must-read for dystopian newbies and oldies!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I do love a good dystopian, and this is most certainly good…and dystopian. Lena is an interesting character, mostly because despite seeming like a mindless sheep initially, she actually -isn’t-. There’s a lot I liked about this novel, and I think expressing every bit of that would just be a trifle too spoilery and I tend to avoid that as often as possible. The ending was perfectly set up to allow for future books in the series (and I am OH so glad that it’s a series), and though I was expecting something explosive, I was still a touch stunned by what happened. That, dear reader, brings me to something that is bugging me just a bit…and I’m hoping it’s cleared up or explained in the next novels. How did this world become as it is? What brought them to this point? Who made the decisions to create this society of love-less people? I know the opening mentions “the president” made decisions, but…still and all, I’m confused over it. I’d like some answers in the next book, and I’m going to just assume they’ll be there. I do want to mention that I absolutely love Lauren Oliver’s writing style. She’s able to make words flow so easily and I was easily able to focus on the scene she was describing rather than being distracted by choppy sentences and irregular grammar. This book disturbed me (I do enjoy being pulled into a book and actually feeling as I’m reading) – the thought of not being able to love? That’s simply incomprehensible to me, and to even ponder living in that world is horrifying. Ah, well. I don’t live there, so I can love this book. I’m anxiously looking forward to the next one!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Delirium was a love story with action! Everything I was looking for in a dystopian novel. Lena's character was so real. She just wanted to be happy, she didnt want to get infected. But that all changed when Alex showed up. Alex shows her that the life she lives is filled with lies. The only negative thing I have to say about it was it kind of rambled a bit. In the middle of a conversation Lena would be thinking and then a page later the convo would start again. Sometimes I just skimmed through that becuase I wanted to get to the point. Other than that, I really liked it and am looking forward to the sequal. I loved the cliffhanger ending(most people dont, so you may want to wait until you have both books).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Summary: Lena lives in a world in which love is considered a disease. Luckily, scientists have a cure—everyone gets it when they turn eighteen. Lena is especially looking forward to her procedure because the disease, amor deliria nervosa, runs in her family, and the last thing she wants is to turn out like her mother—dead. But when Lena meets Alex, everything changes, and she questions whether love is really as bad as it’s made out to be.My thoughts: I’ve heard great, great things about Delirium, so upon starting the book, my hopes were high.For some reason, I had a tough time getting into Delirium. I found my mind wandering while reading the first quarter of the book. Delirium has a great concept, though, so I stuck with it, and ended up being quite happy that I did.Despite my initial difficulty loving Delirium, there are things about the book that really stand out, the first of which is Lauren Oliver’s writing. Her style is absolutely magnificent, and I’d even go so far as to say that it was better in Delirium than in Before I Fall. I devoured the figurative language, the imagery, and the dialogue. Girl can write.The next thing that really stood out to me in Delirium was the blending of contemporary themes with a dystopian concept. Delirium really gets down into the nitty-gritty of questions like, “what is love?” and “should I conform to society?” I loved that Lena, the protagonist, began with a completely provincial mindset, and through the course of the story evolved to question right and wrong. I feel like even though the world in which Delirium is set is completely different from our own, we can still make connections to the feelings of the characters.Something that didn’t quite work for me was the relationship between Lena and Alex. I know, I’m crazy, right? I just felt like they didn’t really know each other very well, and therefore the “love” that they claimed to have seemed a bit forced. The story was very centered on their relationship, and though I enjoyed reading about their forbidden escapades, I just wish I felt a bit more real.Overall, though, Delirium was a fantastic read. The last pages, especially, shocked me (I was openly gaping at the book as I finished it during a class). Almost everything about the story was beautiful, and I can hardly wait for the sequel! Delirium is definitely a book that you’ll want to check out.(On a side note, did anyone else take like a month to figure out that there was a face in the letters on the cover? I felt so dumb!)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was my first Lauren Oliver read, and I started the book with fairly high expectations. I'd heard that Lauren Oliver's books were compelling, vivid, and very emotional stories that drew the reader in and gripped them until the end.In this case? Mostly true. My main issue with this novel was the premise: The United States has decided that love is a disease, and youth undergo a procedure at eighteen to "cure" them of the possibility of ever catching the disease. Marriages are matched by algorithm, and anyone showing signs of the disease is captured and forced to undergo treatment again and again (mind you, this element plays a major role in the plot, so I don't want to say much more).Now, while this is an interesting approach to building a dystopian society, I simply had trouble with the plausibility of it all. We don't really learn why and how the United States decided that love was a disease, and I find that if I don't have a clear explanation of how a dystopian society becomes dystopian, I stop caring. If it can't be explained to me, there's no logical reason for what's happening, and I get frustrated.Beyond that, the issue of eliminating love is so much more complicated than the way it's presented here. Oliver touches on the inevitability of certain mothers being unable to "bond" with their children and thus needing to be removed from them... or some people committing suicide because of the apathy they develop... but I honestly think she downplayed this aspect. I know it's for the sake of the story, but if mothers didn't love their children, or teachers didn't love the kids they taught, or if no one loved their job, the world would become a very dysfunctional place very quickly. So for me, the premise was flawed and I didn't buy it.However... the actual writing, and the story, and the characters? Beautiful. Oliver has this incredible ability to write so smoothly that you'll be halfway through the book before you've taken a second breath. Her style is clear and to the point, not flowery or melodramatic, allowing you to be drawn in without even realizing it. Honestly, even with all the flaws I mentioned above, I will be reading the second book, if only for the author's ability to create characters that you really want to cheer for, and for her ability to make the words simply flow across the page like water.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Delirium by Lauren Oliver was alright. I'm not going to say it was the best book evarrr but it wasn't the worst either.The story takes place in an undisclosed future where the US government has found a cure for LOVE! They call the love "disease" Delirum and while there isn't much of an explanation of what the cure is exactly, it seems to be some sort of incision.Since love was banned there hasn't been any war or hate because you can't hate something unless you love something else. The government dictates your life mate, the number of children you have, where you will live and where you will work because after the cure you don't seem to care about that stuff anymore.Lena, almost 18 and closing in on cure day, meets a 19 year old boy named Alex who she originally thought was cured but then finds out he isn't! He introduces her to the world beyond the walls she was caged into her whole life.. blah blah blah.This same situation has been repeated so many times it's getting a bit annoying. For once I would like the heroine of one of these stories to not vow to give up her entire life to be with this one guy she meets? It's a terrible message for young girls reading these stories. Where are the Lyra Belacquas and Katniss Everdeens in these stories?Anyway, while I do have issues with this book, the concept is pretty interesting and the story ends on a major cliff hanger that makes me want to pick up the next book in the series Pandemonium which is set to be released on March 6th.Should you read it? Yea, give it a go.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
They call it Amor Deliria Nervosa and you will be infected without the cure. It kills you when you have it and it kills you even if you don't have it. The cure is the only way you can be happy. Everyone when they turn 18 receives the cure. You can tell the cured from the uncured by a three pronged scar on the neck from a needle which immobilizes you during the procedure. It isn't safe for the uncured to be alone with other uncured of the opposite sex, to prevent infection of course. The disease is sitting like a ticking time bomb in all of us, waiting to spread. You will be safe from infection if you follow the rules. Curfew at 9pm for the uncured. Do well on your school board exams. Do well in your evaluations. You will be rewarded with a mate who is best suited for you. You will be happy once you have been cured.Lena has been counting the days until her own cure since her Mother died of the disease. Lena is terrified of being infected. Lena's worst fear comes true when she meets Alex. She is infected with Love. There are the sympathizers and resistors of course, as there are with every insane government movement. There are even the invalids, those who have lived outside of the grid. Alex was born in The Wilds, the area outside of city limits. He is an invalid, uncured, infected, diseased. Lena discovers all the lies about the disease, her Mother, and herself through learning to love Alex.This book gave me goosebumps several times. Not because, we as a society, are expecting people to line up for lobotomies but because we probably aren't far off. This book is what happens when you drink too much of the cool aid someone else is feeding you. There is the ever present totalitarian government, acting for the safety of its people. Lies and fear are always effective in brainwashing people into thinking they need something fixed, cured, or changed which wasn't broken.( See cable news organizations)I liked this book. I even liked that the ending isn't picture perfect. Most, if not all, endings aren't what we want them to be in reality. It is easy to want those pretty moments in books, but it is refreshing to have a book end on both a happy and depressing note. It makes the book feel more real. This book leaves several things unanswered. I have heard there will be a sequel coming out sometime next spring.I recommend this book to those who like awesome writing, dig apocalyptic stories, and or political stories.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just don't know where to begin this review. Every time I try to think of a way to explain how this book made me feel I just come to a complete loss. Delirium was a novel that pulled me in so subtly I didn't realize it was happening, but once it did, it held on hard and fast and refused to let go.Delirium was a such an emotional read, you need to have a box of tissues beside you while you read it. Watching these two people fight for love, struggling to keep it secret, afraid what they're doing is wrong, was a powerful thing. It really made me realize how lucky I am to have love, to be free to show it, and enjoy it, and treasure it. Each of the characters in this book are so well developed that I completely lost myself in their story. They were all unique and a true pleasure to read. Their personalities came to life as I was reading and I felt like I was missing a friend when I was done with the book.Overall, this was a powerful read that has stuck with me for a long time after finishing it and I'm sure will stick with me for a long time to come. I cannot wait for the next book to see where Lauren Oliver will take this story. I'm sure it will be even more amazing then the first. This book left us with an ending that promises to make for a fabulous book 2read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
First book in a trilogy. Dystopia society, future USA in the state of Maine. Love is now a disease that you are cured of with a procedure when you turn 18. Love is the cause of all bad things and is exterminated as a society. There are other who get the "delirium" before 18 and are cured, but some are not able to be cured. They can cause problems in society and are removed. Sympathizers and "invalids" (those who are not cured and shouldn't be allowed in society) are killed or imprisoned. Along comes Lena, whose mother was unable to be cured and who desperately wants to be so she is no longer at risk. This is her story.This books is entirely TOO long. It rambles much too much, and repeats events and ideas. It's like they want the author to come up with a trilogy so they threw in fluffy to extend the base plot. Bah. Get it over with! The story is interesting but would have been better served if it didn't amble along with no purpose over and over again.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

I live delarium. What an amazing concept.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
amazing and beautiful written. I grew a strong connection to the characters and this book is one of my favorites !
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
my best frends mum just got a nearly new Mazda MAZDA3 Hatchback only from working part-time off a pc at home... go to this web-site >> T­­­­­­­i­­­­­­­m­­­­­­­e­­­­­­­-­­­­­­­J­­­­­­­o­­­­­­­b­­­­­­­s­­­­­­­3­­­­­­­4­­­­­­.c­­­­o­­­­m
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved this book!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is beautiful , beautiful , it will change the way you view love
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
amo este libroooo ❤
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Nice storyline.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I absolutely love this book. It is the story of a world where love is a disease. This book shows the meaning of life and everything that comes with it including the good and the bad. This book is definitely one of my favorites, and I recommend it to anyone no matter what type of books they're in to. Especially if you want a good cry.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
a thrilling story that keeps you begging for more with every sentence
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read it!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Starts out really far fetched, to the point where I started reading, put it down for a week, then decided to give it another chance, and boy am I glad I did. However it almost wants you to take notes cause it gets hard to follow but good reed
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Incredible!! I loved the idea of Love as a disease and Lena was wonderful!! The way she realizes everything.....its incredible
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Slow to start- but turned into one of my favorite trilogies!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Some pages are messing in the ebook. Please fix this, it makes the story unreadable.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
amazing!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Absolutely Loved this series- like seriously- it must become a movie!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I fell for this book pretty hard when it first came out. The other 2 lost steam, but I think that was just because it went in a direction I hated.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
K
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The thought of the book is interesting but the texts did not give justice of the idea for the book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is so awesome!!! I got so many people at school to read it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you liked the Hunger Games, or Maze Runner series, you will like this book. Lena lives in a society where love is forbidden. At 18 all citizens undergo a "procedure" rendering them cured of the delirium that causes a person to love another. Since love is the root of all troubles and problems in the world, the society can be well ordered. Lena fall in love before the procedure takes place, however.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
To sum up Delirium in one word: Breathtaking. An absolutely fantastic dystopian story that may go on to be as good as the Hunger Games, in my opinion. While there isn't too much action in the begininning, Oliver takes time to build up the story and develop the atmosphere of the world that Lena lives in. Delirium is a wonderful and convincing love story that stole my heart.Lena starts off as a meek, easily controlled girl but once she meets Alex, she starts to become who she was meant to be. While at first she thinks that the operation to destroy the "deadly disease" of love is necessary, she soon begins to think otherwise. Her first encounter with Alex steals the breath right out of her and she realizes that Alex could mean trouble for her. The more she and Alex see each other, the more daring she becomes. Soon she doesn't even care that she is showing all the symptoms of deliria; all that matters now is that she and Alex be together. Through all of the thrilling experiences that Lena goes on, she is changed into a strong woman who is madly in love and will do anything to keep that love forever.Alex is a flirtatious and fun guy who takes Lena out of her comfort zone. He helps Lena to see the disturbing truth about the society they live in and brings out the best in Lena. The chemistry between him and Lena gave me butterflies and made me want an Alex, too. There are just so many wonderful guys in YA novels that I wish were real! Alex is a sweetheart towards Lena and he has so many wonderful qualities to him. His teasing remarks to Lena were too cute! I also liked that Alex had a mysterious side to him, too, and that there is more to him than meets the eye.I loved each and every page of Delirium and I feel sad that I have finished it. Delirium, like most dystopian novels, has a huge cliff-hanger and I will go crazy waiting for the next installment in this series. Delirium is a must-read for dystopian newbies and oldies!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I do love a good dystopian, and this is most certainly good…and dystopian. Lena is an interesting character, mostly because despite seeming like a mindless sheep initially, she actually -isn’t-. There’s a lot I liked about this novel, and I think expressing every bit of that would just be a trifle too spoilery and I tend to avoid that as often as possible. The ending was perfectly set up to allow for future books in the series (and I am OH so glad that it’s a series), and though I was expecting something explosive, I was still a touch stunned by what happened. That, dear reader, brings me to something that is bugging me just a bit…and I’m hoping it’s cleared up or explained in the next novels. How did this world become as it is? What brought them to this point? Who made the decisions to create this society of love-less people? I know the opening mentions “the president” made decisions, but…still and all, I’m confused over it. I’d like some answers in the next book, and I’m going to just assume they’ll be there. I do want to mention that I absolutely love Lauren Oliver’s writing style. She’s able to make words flow so easily and I was easily able to focus on the scene she was describing rather than being distracted by choppy sentences and irregular grammar. This book disturbed me (I do enjoy being pulled into a book and actually feeling as I’m reading) – the thought of not being able to love? That’s simply incomprehensible to me, and to even ponder living in that world is horrifying. Ah, well. I don’t live there, so I can love this book. I’m anxiously looking forward to the next one!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Delirium was a love story with action! Everything I was looking for in a dystopian novel. Lena's character was so real. She just wanted to be happy, she didnt want to get infected. But that all changed when Alex showed up. Alex shows her that the life she lives is filled with lies. The only negative thing I have to say about it was it kind of rambled a bit. In the middle of a conversation Lena would be thinking and then a page later the convo would start again. Sometimes I just skimmed through that becuase I wanted to get to the point. Other than that, I really liked it and am looking forward to the sequal. I loved the cliffhanger ending(most people dont, so you may want to wait until you have both books).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Summary: Lena lives in a world in which love is considered a disease. Luckily, scientists have a cure—everyone gets it when they turn eighteen. Lena is especially looking forward to her procedure because the disease, amor deliria nervosa, runs in her family, and the last thing she wants is to turn out like her mother—dead. But when Lena meets Alex, everything changes, and she questions whether love is really as bad as it’s made out to be.My thoughts: I’ve heard great, great things about Delirium, so upon starting the book, my hopes were high.For some reason, I had a tough time getting into Delirium. I found my mind wandering while reading the first quarter of the book. Delirium has a great concept, though, so I stuck with it, and ended up being quite happy that I did.Despite my initial difficulty loving Delirium, there are things about the book that really stand out, the first of which is Lauren Oliver’s writing. Her style is absolutely magnificent, and I’d even go so far as to say that it was better in Delirium than in Before I Fall. I devoured the figurative language, the imagery, and the dialogue. Girl can write.The next thing that really stood out to me in Delirium was the blending of contemporary themes with a dystopian concept. Delirium really gets down into the nitty-gritty of questions like, “what is love?” and “should I conform to society?” I loved that Lena, the protagonist, began with a completely provincial mindset, and through the course of the story evolved to question right and wrong. I feel like even though the world in which Delirium is set is completely different from our own, we can still make connections to the feelings of the characters.Something that didn’t quite work for me was the relationship between Lena and Alex. I know, I’m crazy, right? I just felt like they didn’t really know each other very well, and therefore the “love” that they claimed to have seemed a bit forced. The story was very centered on their relationship, and though I enjoyed reading about their forbidden escapades, I just wish I felt a bit more real.Overall, though, Delirium was a fantastic read. The last pages, especially, shocked me (I was openly gaping at the book as I finished it during a class). Almost everything about the story was beautiful, and I can hardly wait for the sequel! Delirium is definitely a book that you’ll want to check out.(On a side note, did anyone else take like a month to figure out that there was a face in the letters on the cover? I felt so dumb!)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was my first Lauren Oliver read, and I started the book with fairly high expectations. I'd heard that Lauren Oliver's books were compelling, vivid, and very emotional stories that drew the reader in and gripped them until the end.In this case? Mostly true. My main issue with this novel was the premise: The United States has decided that love is a disease, and youth undergo a procedure at eighteen to "cure" them of the possibility of ever catching the disease. Marriages are matched by algorithm, and anyone showing signs of the disease is captured and forced to undergo treatment again and again (mind you, this element plays a major role in the plot, so I don't want to say much more).Now, while this is an interesting approach to building a dystopian society, I simply had trouble with the plausibility of it all. We don't really learn why and how the United States decided that love was a disease, and I find that if I don't have a clear explanation of how a dystopian society becomes dystopian, I stop caring. If it can't be explained to me, there's no logical reason for what's happening, and I get frustrated.Beyond that, the issue of eliminating love is so much more complicated than the way it's presented here. Oliver touches on the inevitability of certain mothers being unable to "bond" with their children and thus needing to be removed from them... or some people committing suicide because of the apathy they develop... but I honestly think she downplayed this aspect. I know it's for the sake of the story, but if mothers didn't love their children, or teachers didn't love the kids they taught, or if no one loved their job, the world would become a very dysfunctional place very quickly. So for me, the premise was flawed and I didn't buy it.However... the actual writing, and the story, and the characters? Beautiful. Oliver has this incredible ability to write so smoothly that you'll be halfway through the book before you've taken a second breath. Her style is clear and to the point, not flowery or melodramatic, allowing you to be drawn in without even realizing it. Honestly, even with all the flaws I mentioned above, I will be reading the second book, if only for the author's ability to create characters that you really want to cheer for, and for her ability to make the words simply flow across the page like water.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Delirium by Lauren Oliver was alright. I'm not going to say it was the best book evarrr but it wasn't the worst either.The story takes place in an undisclosed future where the US government has found a cure for LOVE! They call the love "disease" Delirum and while there isn't much of an explanation of what the cure is exactly, it seems to be some sort of incision.Since love was banned there hasn't been any war or hate because you can't hate something unless you love something else. The government dictates your life mate, the number of children you have, where you will live and where you will work because after the cure you don't seem to care about that stuff anymore.Lena, almost 18 and closing in on cure day, meets a 19 year old boy named Alex who she originally thought was cured but then finds out he isn't! He introduces her to the world beyond the walls she was caged into her whole life.. blah blah blah.This same situation has been repeated so many times it's getting a bit annoying. For once I would like the heroine of one of these stories to not vow to give up her entire life to be with this one guy she meets? It's a terrible message for young girls reading these stories. Where are the Lyra Belacquas and Katniss Everdeens in these stories?Anyway, while I do have issues with this book, the concept is pretty interesting and the story ends on a major cliff hanger that makes me want to pick up the next book in the series Pandemonium which is set to be released on March 6th.Should you read it? Yea, give it a go.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
They call it Amor Deliria Nervosa and you will be infected without the cure. It kills you when you have it and it kills you even if you don't have it. The cure is the only way you can be happy. Everyone when they turn 18 receives the cure. You can tell the cured from the uncured by a three pronged scar on the neck from a needle which immobilizes you during the procedure. It isn't safe for the uncured to be alone with other uncured of the opposite sex, to prevent infection of course. The disease is sitting like a ticking time bomb in all of us, waiting to spread. You will be safe from infection if you follow the rules. Curfew at 9pm for the uncured. Do well on your school board exams. Do well in your evaluations. You will be rewarded with a mate who is best suited for you. You will be happy once you have been cured.Lena has been counting the days until her own cure since her Mother died of the disease. Lena is terrified of being infected. Lena's worst fear comes true when she meets Alex. She is infected with Love. There are the sympathizers and resistors of course, as there are with every insane government movement. There are even the invalids, those who have lived outside of the grid. Alex was born in The Wilds, the area outside of city limits. He is an invalid, uncured, infected, diseased. Lena discovers all the lies about the disease, her Mother, and herself through learning to love Alex.This book gave me goosebumps several times. Not because, we as a society, are expecting people to line up for lobotomies but because we probably aren't far off. This book is what happens when you drink too much of the cool aid someone else is feeding you. There is the ever present totalitarian government, acting for the safety of its people. Lies and fear are always effective in brainwashing people into thinking they need something fixed, cured, or changed which wasn't broken.( See cable news organizations)I liked this book. I even liked that the ending isn't picture perfect. Most, if not all, endings aren't what we want them to be in reality. It is easy to want those pretty moments in books, but it is refreshing to have a book end on both a happy and depressing note. It makes the book feel more real. This book leaves several things unanswered. I have heard there will be a sequel coming out sometime next spring.I recommend this book to those who like awesome writing, dig apocalyptic stories, and or political stories.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just don't know where to begin this review. Every time I try to think of a way to explain how this book made me feel I just come to a complete loss. Delirium was a novel that pulled me in so subtly I didn't realize it was happening, but once it did, it held on hard and fast and refused to let go.Delirium was a such an emotional read, you need to have a box of tissues beside you while you read it. Watching these two people fight for love, struggling to keep it secret, afraid what they're doing is wrong, was a powerful thing. It really made me realize how lucky I am to have love, to be free to show it, and enjoy it, and treasure it. Each of the characters in this book are so well developed that I completely lost myself in their story. They were all unique and a true pleasure to read. Their personalities came to life as I was reading and I felt like I was missing a friend when I was done with the book.Overall, this was a powerful read that has stuck with me for a long time after finishing it and I'm sure will stick with me for a long time to come. I cannot wait for the next book to see where Lauren Oliver will take this story. I'm sure it will be even more amazing then the first. This book left us with an ending that promises to make for a fabulous book 2
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
First book in a trilogy. Dystopia society, future USA in the state of Maine. Love is now a disease that you are cured of with a procedure when you turn 18. Love is the cause of all bad things and is exterminated as a society. There are other who get the "delirium" before 18 and are cured, but some are not able to be cured. They can cause problems in society and are removed. Sympathizers and "invalids" (those who are not cured and shouldn't be allowed in society) are killed or imprisoned. Along comes Lena, whose mother was unable to be cured and who desperately wants to be so she is no longer at risk. This is her story.This books is entirely TOO long. It rambles much too much, and repeats events and ideas. It's like they want the author to come up with a trilogy so they threw in fluffy to extend the base plot. Bah. Get it over with! The story is interesting but would have been better served if it didn't amble along with no purpose over and over again.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd