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Lauren Oliver's powerful New York Times bestselling novel Delirium—the first in a dystopian trilogy—presents a world as terrifying as George Orwell's 1984 and a romance as true as Romeo & Juliet.

In an alternate United States, love has been declared a dangerous disease, and the government forces everyone who reaches eighteen to have a procedure called the Cure. Living with her aunt, uncle, and cousins in Portland, Maine, Lena Haloway is very much looking forward to being cured and living a safe, predictable life. She watched love destroy her mother and isn't about to make the same mistakes.

But with ninety-five days left until her treatment, Lena meets enigmatic Alex, a boy from the Wilds who lives under the government's radar. What will happen if they do the unthinkable and fall in love?

Delirium received starred reviews from Kirkus and School Library Journal, and was named a Best Book of the Year by USA Today, Kirkus, Amazon.com, YALSA, and the Chicago Public Library and was selected as one of NPR's Top 100 Best Ever Teen Novels.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Topics: Dystopia, Maine, Speculative Fiction, Trilogy, Adventurous, Futuristic, Dramatic, Love, Love Story, First Love, Rebellion, Forbidden Love, Escaping Oppression, Friendship, Family, Suspenseful, On the Run, Female Friendship, Courage, Unrequited Love, Survival, Coming of Age, Death, Female Protagonist, and First in a Series

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062114037
List price: $9.99
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I didn’t notice the face on the cover of this book until someone pointed it out to me. I’d like to think this is because I had my nose buried so far in it that I wasn’t looking at the cover, and not because I wasn’t paying attention.

Lena, the main character, is almost at the age where she will be cured of “deliria” – which is how love is described in her world. The further you read into the story though, the more you realize that what their society describes as love is not the traditional definition. Love to them is an infectious disease that they have been told to fear; one that will drive them to insanity and later lead to death. Their definition of love is skewed so much that it bears little resemblance to ours. Their solution to the problem is a surgery that causes the patient to be unemotional and accepting of whatever comes their way.

There are some impracticalities in the story, such as: if they don’t care about each other then why would parents be worried about how their children fare in life? I suppose that it could be explained as an instinctual desire to provide for offspring, but it did seem like an inconsistency. Or maybe that inconsistency could also play out in later books as the ability of the brain to recover function after the surgery. I don’t know, and the fact was that it really didn’t bother me all that much when I was reading because I was having so much fun.

I zipped right through Delirium and enjoyed it immensely despite any small issues I may have had with how realistic the world was. It is fast paced and intense – as Lena has to decide how much is too much to risk for her friends and her freedom.

I highly recommend Delirium if you like plot-driven young adult dystopian fiction. It is the first in a trilogy – the other two books will be Pandemonium and Requiem.more
Actual stars: 3.5

The beginning felt rough, in the sense it felt like Uglies and Hunger Games all rolled up together. It definitely picks up in the last half. It will be interesting to see where it goes in the remainder of the trilogy.more
This book reminded me a lot of Matched and Uglies. I thought the concept was unique enough though that it wasn't too similar to other dystopian novels. Can't wait to read the sequal!more
I loved Lauren Oliver’s debut novel Before I Fall so I was really interested to see what she would write next. When I heard it was a dystopian tale I was even more interested so when I got a chance to read it I couldn’t wait to get stuck in. I certainly wasn’t disappointed, within the first few chapters I became caught up in Lena’s world and found it hard to put the book down.

The plot starts off fairly slowly, as Oliver builds Lena’s world. That’s not to say it comes without incident, Lena is preparing for her assessment – it is this combined with her school results that will determine the husband she is matched with. I felt myself getting anxious along with Lena as this important meeting loomed, I really felt a sense of involvement with the character. The plot definitely picks up pace as the book progresses, I found that the more I read the more I wanted to read.

I enjoyed the characters that Oliver created, as I’ve already said I found myself getting totally wrapped up in what was happening with Lena. I also enjoyed Alex, the boy she meets and falls for. I liked their interactions, and how their story developed.

I thought the concept that love instead of being a good thing was actually an illness to be really interesting. I liked the way the concept was described, it didn’t feel like too big a jump to understand how people had begun to believe it.

I shall certainly be looking forward to the further two books in this trilogy.
more
Read all 266 reviews

Reviews

I didn’t notice the face on the cover of this book until someone pointed it out to me. I’d like to think this is because I had my nose buried so far in it that I wasn’t looking at the cover, and not because I wasn’t paying attention.

Lena, the main character, is almost at the age where she will be cured of “deliria” – which is how love is described in her world. The further you read into the story though, the more you realize that what their society describes as love is not the traditional definition. Love to them is an infectious disease that they have been told to fear; one that will drive them to insanity and later lead to death. Their definition of love is skewed so much that it bears little resemblance to ours. Their solution to the problem is a surgery that causes the patient to be unemotional and accepting of whatever comes their way.

There are some impracticalities in the story, such as: if they don’t care about each other then why would parents be worried about how their children fare in life? I suppose that it could be explained as an instinctual desire to provide for offspring, but it did seem like an inconsistency. Or maybe that inconsistency could also play out in later books as the ability of the brain to recover function after the surgery. I don’t know, and the fact was that it really didn’t bother me all that much when I was reading because I was having so much fun.

I zipped right through Delirium and enjoyed it immensely despite any small issues I may have had with how realistic the world was. It is fast paced and intense – as Lena has to decide how much is too much to risk for her friends and her freedom.

I highly recommend Delirium if you like plot-driven young adult dystopian fiction. It is the first in a trilogy – the other two books will be Pandemonium and Requiem.more
Actual stars: 3.5

The beginning felt rough, in the sense it felt like Uglies and Hunger Games all rolled up together. It definitely picks up in the last half. It will be interesting to see where it goes in the remainder of the trilogy.more
This book reminded me a lot of Matched and Uglies. I thought the concept was unique enough though that it wasn't too similar to other dystopian novels. Can't wait to read the sequal!more
I loved Lauren Oliver’s debut novel Before I Fall so I was really interested to see what she would write next. When I heard it was a dystopian tale I was even more interested so when I got a chance to read it I couldn’t wait to get stuck in. I certainly wasn’t disappointed, within the first few chapters I became caught up in Lena’s world and found it hard to put the book down.

The plot starts off fairly slowly, as Oliver builds Lena’s world. That’s not to say it comes without incident, Lena is preparing for her assessment – it is this combined with her school results that will determine the husband she is matched with. I felt myself getting anxious along with Lena as this important meeting loomed, I really felt a sense of involvement with the character. The plot definitely picks up pace as the book progresses, I found that the more I read the more I wanted to read.

I enjoyed the characters that Oliver created, as I’ve already said I found myself getting totally wrapped up in what was happening with Lena. I also enjoyed Alex, the boy she meets and falls for. I liked their interactions, and how their story developed.

I thought the concept that love instead of being a good thing was actually an illness to be really interesting. I liked the way the concept was described, it didn’t feel like too big a jump to understand how people had begun to believe it.

I shall certainly be looking forward to the further two books in this trilogy.
more
Finished quickly and yes I really enjoyed this book. lately I've been reading a lot of dystopia young adult books and a lot of them are quite good. The only annoying thing is that they are all part of series meaning I have to wait to red the next book. The second book will be out in 3 weeks so that is not that bad.

Lauren Oliver has a way of writing. I loved some of her sentences and as with Before I fall she got me hooked. Liked the idea of a world where they considered love to be a disease.more
Review courtesy of Dark Faerie Tales.Quick & Dirty: An enticing and alluring dystopian about love with the right amount of romance.Opening Sentence: It has been sixty-four years since the president and the Consortium identified love as a disease, and forty-three since the scientists perfected a cure.The Review:I’m really late in reading Delirium by Lauren Oliver, a story where love is a disease and is forbidden. In this dystopian society, Oliver brings out the beautiful and ugly side of emotions, feelings, and simply, about love. But I’m glad that I was late, because after this story ended, I would have died in agony. What would I do after the proverbial “The End” appears on the page? Oliver showed me her talent and definitely lured me in.Delirium is set in Portland, Maine, where this world considers love, amor deliria nervosa, a serious and dangerous disease. “It affects your mind so that you cannot think clearly, or make rational decisions about your own well-being. When citizens turn eighteen, they undergo a surgical procedure removing a part of the brain to cure them of the disease. They are also interviewed and matched to their ideal mate. Lena is on the cusp of the age, eager to rid herself of the disease. She remembers what it did to her mother, as well as her father. Everything changes for Lena when she meets Alex. Her world is challenged and her views questioned. Lena questions who she is as a person and falls deeply for this boy.Lena is a well-rounded character. I saw Lena evolve throughout the span of Delirium. Oliver writes fantastic characters on paper. Seeing the world through Lena’s point of view brought the same emotions that she felt. I found Lena to be naive and innocent, accepting things at face value. But as time passed, I saw how Lena changed. I appreciated the shortcomings of her character because it brought out strengths later on.I can’t really talk about Alex, only because it would spoil several things. I adored him and his tenacity, loving him even more for his passion. Oliver wrote this swoony boy well, providing the perfect plot device. The love story seemed genuine and I thought it manifested in a realistic and timely manner. I loved these two characters together and apart.The world set in Delirium is different, attempting at an utopian society where love is taken out of the equation. Oliver’s world is developed, vibrant, and rich, always providing the perfect setting for any of the given scenes. The characters are riveting and unique, each with their own personality in a world where emotions are null and void. I felt a disconnect to some of the characters, but I think it was how I related to them. I found myself wishing that they could be a different way, or think in another. But I will tell you this: despite my feelings for the characters, I was still hooked to the story.Oliver writes beautifully, bringing a unique prose to the mix of young adult stories. While Delirium can be fast-paced at times, I never found it to be too much, too fast. I enjoyed the pace and devoured each word that she produced. The whole premise of Delirium grabbed my attention, but it was the story and plot that kept me reading.I will warn you, for the handful of you who have not read Delirium yet, Oliver ends it with a terrible cliffhanger. The bad news is, your heart lunges when you read those final words. The good news is that the trilogy is complete and you do not have to wait a year to read the next installment.Notable Scene:And I remind myself that I probably imagined the whole thing — the message, the meeting up. He’s probably sitting in his apartment somewhere, doing course work for his classes. He’s probably already forgetting about the two girls he met at the lab complex today. He was probably just being nice earlier, making casual conversationIt’s for the best. But no matter how many times I repeat it, the strange hollow feeling in my stomach doesn’t go away. And ridiculous as it is, I can’t shake the persistent, needling feeling that I’ve forgotten something, or missed something, or lost something forever.FTC Advisory: HarperTeen provided me with a copy of Delirium. No goody bags, sponsorships, “material connections,” or bribes were exchanged for my review.more
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