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The tragic true story of a love cut short by AIDS, written by National Book Award winner Paul Monette

In 1974, Paul Monette met Roger Horwitz, the man with whom he would share more than a decade of his life. In 1986, Roger died of complications from AIDS. Borrowed Time traces this love story from start to tragic finish. At a time when the medical community was just beginning to understand this mysterious and virulent disease, Monette and others like him were coming to terms with unfathomable loss. This personal account of the early days of the AIDS crisis tells the story of love in the face of death.

A finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, Borrowed Time was one of the first memoirs to deal candidly with AIDS and is as moving and relevant now as it was more than twenty-five years ago. Written with fierce honesty and heartwarming tenderness, this book is part love story, part testimony, and part requiem.

This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.

Topics: Grief

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Mar 25, 2014
ISBN: 9781480473850
List price: $14.99
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Brilliant at the time, but we were not as inured to people dying.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Grief is a sword, or it is nothing."A furious, sharp and heartbreaking memoir of the early days of the U.S. AIDS epidemic, and Monette's partner's diagnosis, illness and death. Fiercely sorrowful, unsparingly angry. This book has substantial gaps in its political insight; it is primarily a story of the ravages AIDS wreaked on white rich gay men's community in Los Angeles in the mid-80s. But it is still one of the best political memoirs I've ever read, for its sheer determination and clarity of vision. Love and rage, Monette's got it down. Beautifully written.Be careful with this one, especially if you have major ghosts to mourn. It will break that grief open; it will rage through you and may break you apart.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very touching, if a little long-winded at times.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Brilliant at the time, but we were not as inured to people dying.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Grief is a sword, or it is nothing."A furious, sharp and heartbreaking memoir of the early days of the U.S. AIDS epidemic, and Monette's partner's diagnosis, illness and death. Fiercely sorrowful, unsparingly angry. This book has substantial gaps in its political insight; it is primarily a story of the ravages AIDS wreaked on white rich gay men's community in Los Angeles in the mid-80s. But it is still one of the best political memoirs I've ever read, for its sheer determination and clarity of vision. Love and rage, Monette's got it down. Beautifully written.Be careful with this one, especially if you have major ghosts to mourn. It will break that grief open; it will rage through you and may break you apart.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very touching, if a little long-winded at times.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I can find no words within me to describe how achingly beautiful and heartbreaking this book is. At times an uplifting tribute filled with love, it also abounds with despair at the pointlessness of the ravages of AIDS, at a time when people little understood the illness, nor did they want to unless directly affected by it. I don't believe I have ever read a more beautiful love story. While ultimately describing the end of a love as one partner dies, leaving the other faced with a future not only alone but also filled with the possibility of dying in a similar fashion; this exquisitely written book also manages to fill you with a feeling that, yes, there is such a thing as an ultimate love that exists in purity and simplicity, for no other reason than the joy of enjoying that love with another who loves you. This belief ultimately makes it heartbreaking when the inevitable death of Paul's lover, who he refers to as his best friend, Roger, happens in the last chapter.I wouldn't recommend this book to you as a good read that you should experience just for being well written. I would implore everyone to read this for the vital lessons it will impart on you, about passionate love, decline and death. An amazing work!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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