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Editor’s Note

“A Heart-Wrenching Truth...”

This National Book Award-winning memoir, written after the author contracted HIV, is an honest, heart-wrenching look at the freedom to love & the right to life.
Scribd Editor
Paul Monette’s National Book Award–winning memoir hailed as a classic coming-out story

Paul Monette grew up all-American, Catholic, overachieving . . . and closeted. As a child of the 1950s, a time when a kid suspected of being a “homo” would routinely be beaten up, Monette kept his secret throughout his adolescence. He wrestled with his sexuality for the first thirty years of his life, priding himself on his ability to “pass” for straight. The story of his journey to adulthood and to self-acceptance with grace and honesty, this intimate portrait of a young man’s struggle with his own desires is witty, humorous, and deeply felt.

Before his death of complications from AIDS in 1995, Monette was an outspoken activist crusading for gay rights. Becoming a Man shows his courageous path to stand up for his own right to love and be loved.

This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.

Topics: LGBTQ, Coming Out, HIV/AIDS, Heartfelt, Creative Nonfiction, and Civil and Political Rights

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781480473867
List price: $14.99
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Availability for Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story
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Coming of age in the fifties, Paul Monette lived a life that, in a sense, paralleled my own as I too am a child of the fifties. And I also share with him the theme of discovery, the inward thoughtfulness that, if it does not lead every boy to write his own autobiography, it leads them to a life of the imagination and a love of literature and the arts. Paul Monette shares more than his coming of age in the fifties, for his is a story of the outsider, the gay man in the boy whose life leads to the age of AIDS and the loss that has been brought with it. From small town through the Ivy League school to the life of a writer, Monette brings a truth to his story that only a truly personal memoir can hold. This is a book to cherish for its spirit and story, for it is a story that is universal and humane. Seldom has a book so richly deserved the awards and accolades it has received.more
Monette's searing anger at his oppressors, which include his younger self, make this book, in my opinion, just as relevant today as it was when it was written. It's not like there aren't millions of people on the planet trying to stuff queer folk back into their closets. I highly recommend this book to anyone who's struggling with being different.more
In this touching, insightful memoir, Paul Monette recalls growing up gay in the 60s and 70s and shares his battle with internalized hatred as he struggles to accept himself and seek acceptance from others. Monette does not shy away from the gritty details. His accounts of some of his sexual experiences are as raw and painful as he recalls the actual events to have been, and he does not sugarcoat anything. Monette explores his life in the context of American society and the then-emerging gay rights movement and considers the consequences of America's initial reluctance to address the AIDS epidemic, as he finds that he is only able to write half a life story. This is a very moving, eye opening book that serves to remind us that behind every statistic about AIDS or homosexuality is a person struggling to make peace with himself.more
A frank, honest and very moving memoir, it is beautifully written (which make the odd grammatical error all the more perplexing) with prose which flow almost seamlessly. The writer describes a varied and colourful life searching for Mr Right, and while he eventually finds fulfilment and happiness, the ultimate conclusion is nothing short of tear inducing. A most enjoyable read.more
Read all 5 reviews

Reviews

Coming of age in the fifties, Paul Monette lived a life that, in a sense, paralleled my own as I too am a child of the fifties. And I also share with him the theme of discovery, the inward thoughtfulness that, if it does not lead every boy to write his own autobiography, it leads them to a life of the imagination and a love of literature and the arts. Paul Monette shares more than his coming of age in the fifties, for his is a story of the outsider, the gay man in the boy whose life leads to the age of AIDS and the loss that has been brought with it. From small town through the Ivy League school to the life of a writer, Monette brings a truth to his story that only a truly personal memoir can hold. This is a book to cherish for its spirit and story, for it is a story that is universal and humane. Seldom has a book so richly deserved the awards and accolades it has received.more
Monette's searing anger at his oppressors, which include his younger self, make this book, in my opinion, just as relevant today as it was when it was written. It's not like there aren't millions of people on the planet trying to stuff queer folk back into their closets. I highly recommend this book to anyone who's struggling with being different.more
In this touching, insightful memoir, Paul Monette recalls growing up gay in the 60s and 70s and shares his battle with internalized hatred as he struggles to accept himself and seek acceptance from others. Monette does not shy away from the gritty details. His accounts of some of his sexual experiences are as raw and painful as he recalls the actual events to have been, and he does not sugarcoat anything. Monette explores his life in the context of American society and the then-emerging gay rights movement and considers the consequences of America's initial reluctance to address the AIDS epidemic, as he finds that he is only able to write half a life story. This is a very moving, eye opening book that serves to remind us that behind every statistic about AIDS or homosexuality is a person struggling to make peace with himself.more
A frank, honest and very moving memoir, it is beautifully written (which make the odd grammatical error all the more perplexing) with prose which flow almost seamlessly. The writer describes a varied and colourful life searching for Mr Right, and while he eventually finds fulfilment and happiness, the ultimate conclusion is nothing short of tear inducing. A most enjoyable read.more
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