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From the Publisher

This collection of poetry culls Karl Stead’s most lasting and memorable works into a single volume. Drawn from previously published works though his distinguished career, from his debut collection Whether the Will is Free to his recent publication The Black River, this resource also contains 22 previously unpublished poems from his early days.

Published: Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781775580478
List price: $31.99
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