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From the Publisher

Sybrina's Phrase Thesaurus is a reference tool for anyone with a need to compose unique, descriptive phrases. It's a great tool for creative writers of any genre including students, people just learning English (ESL), people wanting to improve their communication skills, artistic professionals like photographers, videographers, models, actors and many others. Anyone who enjoys reading unique descriptive phrases will love Sybrina's Phrase Thesaurus because it is packed full of descriptive phrases on every subject ...from descriptions of the body, and how it looks, moves and interacts ...to word pictures describing of all types of landscapes, waterscapes and skyscapes.

Volume 4 - EARTH VIEWS - This book consists of Landscapes (plains, hills, mountains, valleys), Waterscapes (waterfalls, streams, rivers, ponds) and Skyscapes (morning, sunny, cloudy, rain, space, stars) and much more. There is also a section for COLORS with descriptions for all the colors in the rainbow plus other things like metals, shiny, light, dark, day and night. Just read the phrases and use what you want just as they're written or better yet, read all the suggested phrases in a particular category for inspiration to conquer your writer's block!

Anyone who enjoys reading unique descriptive phrases will love Sybrina’s Phrase Thesaurus because it is packed full of descriptive phrases on every subject...from descriptions of the body, and how it looks, moves and ineracts...to word pictures describing all types of landscapes, waterscapes and skyscapes. The printed books are split into 4 volumes.

Published: Sybrina Durant on
ISBN: 9781311527059
List price: $0.99
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