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Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino

Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino

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Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino

ratings:
4/5 (85 ratings)
Length:
157 pages
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 29, 2014
ISBN:
9780062346971
Format:
Book

Description

El eterno clásico sobre ""las últimas novedades del Infierno y las irrebatibles respuestas del Cielo"" Esta clásica obra maestra de sátira ha entretenido e iluminado a lectores alrededor del mundo con su irónica y astuta representación de la vida y las debilidades humanas desde el punto de vista de Escrutopo, el asistente de alto rango de ""Nuestro Padre de Abajo."" En este divertidísimo, muy serio y excepcionalmente original libro, C. S. Lewis comparte con nosotros la correspondencia entre el viejo diablo y su sobrino Orugario, un novato demonio encargado de asegurarse de la condenación de un joven hombre. Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino es la historia más atractiva acerca de la tentación -- y el triunfo sobre ella -- jamás escrita.
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 29, 2014
ISBN:
9780062346971
Format:
Book

About the author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a fellow and tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement.


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Top quotes

  • Mientras estén pendientes del Enemigo, estamos vencidos, pero hay formas de evitar que se ocupen de Él. La más sencilla consiste en desviar su mirada de Él hacia ellos mismos.

  • Todos los hábitos del paciente, tanto mentales como corporales, están todavía de nuestra parte.

  • Todos los mortales tienden a convertirse en lo que pretenden ser. Esto es elemental.

  • He tenido pacientes tan bien controlados que, en un instante, podía hacerles pasar de pedir apasionadamente por el “alma” de su esposa o de su hijo a pegar o insultar a la esposa o al hijo de verdad, sin el menor escrúpulo.

  • Una vez que consigas hacerle pensar que “la religión está muy bien, pero hasta cierto punto”, podrás sentirte satisfecho acerca de su alma. Una religión moderada es tan buena para nosotros como la falta absoluta de religión —y más divertida.

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Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino - C.S. Lewis

1941

I

Mi querido Orugario:

Tomo nota de lo que dices acerca de orientar las lecturas de tu paciente y de ocuparte de que vea muy a menudo a su amigo materialista, pero ¿no estarás pecando de ingenuo? Parece como si creyeses que los razonamientos son el mejor medio de librarle de las garras del Enemigo. Si hubiese vivido hace unos (pocos) siglos, es posible que sí: en aquella época, los hombres todavía sabían bastante bien cuándo estaba probada una cosa, y cuándo no lo estaba; y una vez demostrada, la creían de verdad; todavía unían el pensamiento a la acción, y estaban dispuestos a cambiar su modo de vida como consecuencia de una cadena de razonamientos. Pero ahora, con las revistas semanales y otras armas semejantes, hemos cambiado mucho todo eso. Tu hombre se ha acostumbrado, desde que era un muchacho, a tener dentro de su cabeza, bailoteando juntas, una docena de filosofías incompatibles. Ahora no piensa, ante todo, si las doctrinas son ciertas o falsas, sino académicas o prácticas, superadas o actuales, convencionales o implacables. La jerga, no la argumentación, es tu mejor aliado en la labor de mantenerle apartado de la iglesia. ¡No pierdas el tiempo tratando de hacerle creer que el materialismo es la verdad! Hazle pensar que es poderoso, o sobrio, o valiente; que es la filosofía del futuro. Eso es lo que le

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4.2
85 ratings / 79 Reviews
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  • (1/5)
     Boring. Boring and moralistic. Boring and moralistic and designed to help us improve ourselves.
  • (4/5)
    A senior devil gives advice on tempting humans to his nephew, a junior devil
  • (4/5)
    In Screwtapes' letters and toast, Lewis creates an utterly mundane Hell, filled with bureaucrats and researchers, secret police and cooks. The contrast between this mundanity and the supposed Eternal Torture-Hole of the Damned is an amusing thread throughout the letters, as is the very glee that Screwtape shows while dissecting the finer points of Underwordly strategy.
  • (4/5)
    I came to this work expecting it to be a clever yet annoying apologetic for Mr. Lewis' vision of Christianity. While it is an apologia, it's remarkably fun listening. Mr. Lewis puts into Screwtape's letters some things he probably couldn't have gotten away with in a different format. I'm not sure, but it certainly seems like there were some very direct personal jabs in "Screwtape's" letters. Much to my surprise, there is a whole lot of really juicy insights into human psychology and the human condition here. Even when I disagree with his conclusions (most of the time) I have to admire his insights.

    I also have to admire his rhetorical skills. For all that I disagree with him, I wouldn't want to debate him. The man is damn good at constructing a logical argument.

    If I were a younger person, and had been raised in Mr. Lewis' variety of Christianity, I probably would have loved this work. I imagine a lot of liberal Christians take great comfort in Mr. Lewis's implicit contention that loveing Christianity is objectively true. I can see why this work has stayed so popular for so long.

    Weirdly enough, this felt less directly didactic than his Narnia books. Then again, I read the Narnia series expecting a fantasy adventure story. If I had expected it to be apologetics in fantasy form I might have felt less beaten by the metaphor hammer.

    I am very likely to re-read this one. While "simply" a series of letters, what Screwtapes includes and excludes from his letters shapes a story with a lot of depth and complexity. Aside from that, this is worth examining for the quality and depth of the rhetorical/argumentation skills displayed. I think I can learn alot about constructing persuasive arguments from this work.
  • (4/5)
    Always a good read with insight into temptation and the human condition.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book which tells how the Devil thinks and how he manipulates us in order to try to keep us away from God.
  • (4/5)
    I don't know where to start with reviewing The Screwtape Letters. Perhaps with the fact -- probably already well-known to people who get my reviews in their inbox -- that I am not a Christian, but a Unitarian Universalist. But I do love reading C. S. Lewis' work: I think he was very good as using cool intellect and reason to examine himself in his faith (not just the faith of others, which would likely be unbearably holier-than-thou), a process myself and other UUs tend to value highly. He was ready to think about his faith, and seek answers -- or understanding, at least -- of things others deem unfathomable, the whys of things.

    The Screwtape letters is a fictional frame for more of that work, really. He examines the ways that people are lead away from their faiths, not just through large sins like unchastity but through being proud of humility, for example... And the way he puts this makes it not only an examination of Christian goodness, but general moral goodness.

    Definitely worth a read for that, and amusing in it's own way, as well -- old Uncle Screwtape's unfortunate transformation, for example.
  • (4/5)
    This short little book (160 pages)took me 5 days to read. That isn't because I wasn't interested but I found I had to read some passages two or three times to grasp what Lewis was saying. At other times his writing was very easy to understand and I enjoyed his sense of humour. The idea of the book is that a senior devil, Screwtape, is giving pointers to a junior devil, Wormwood (you have to love the names given to the devils), about how to encourage a young English man to sin in order that his soul will belong to the devil upon his death. The time is during the Second World War and this young man has recently started attending church. For a while it looks like Wormwood will succeed as the young man falls in with a crowd who are "thoroughly reliable people; steady, consistent scoffers and wordlings who without any particular crimes are progressing quietly and comfortably towards" Hell (our Father's house as Screwtape refers to it). Then the young man falls in love with a Christian woman ("...such a Christian--a vile, sneaking, simpering, demure, monosyllabic, bread-and-butter miss") and the plans start to unravel. Screwtape gets so exasperated with Wormwood at one point that he turns into a large centipede. As the book proceeds a clear picture of the struggle between good and evil is drawn. "It does not matter how small the sins provided that their cumulative effect is to edge the man away from the Light and out into Nothing. Murder is no better than cards if cards can do the trick. Indeed the safest road to Hell is the gradual one--the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts." C.S. Lewis was an atheist who converted while at college and described himself as "the most dejected and reluctant convert in all of England". That may be but he went on to write some wonderful books that illuminate thoughts decades later. If you ignore the references to the Germans the time could almost be now with war in Iraq and Afghanistan and many other places. Even if you are an atheist (or an agnostic as I am) you can't help but worry about where our world is headed. As another Englishman, Edmund Burke, said "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is that good men do nothing."
  • (4/5)
    This book was very creatively done. It is a humorous read from a devil's point of view. Not only that, but it has a way of making you stop and realize when you are exhibiting some of the traits / actions / vices that the senior devil (Screwtape) is describing to the junior devil / tempter (Wormwood). A terrific read, though the style of English used in the letters slowed me down a little bit.
  • (4/5)
    Nothing like reading the Screwtape Letters to renew to see how fickle we are and how much we need to approach one another with a good dose of humility and forgiveness. I typically read it once a decade as a reminder.
  • (5/5)
    Letters from an experienced devil (Screwtape,a tempter) to a new, young tempter (Wormwood). Screwtape attempts to instruct and correct Wormwood on the art of tempting his "patient" to keep him from the Enemy (God). Takes place during World War II. I found this to be a great read and well worth the wait to finally get my hands on a copy. The language is hard to concentrate on with much background noise. I read at night while my husband watches television and I found the television to be very distracting to me. I had my best reading sessions in complete silence, but that is just how I read. If you are easily distracted, be sure to read in quiet. The story holds some great lessons for Christian living.
  • (4/5)
    enjoyed it although it was hard for me to get through it
  • (5/5)
    A unique book. I have read it over and over again for the past 20 years. There is so much truth in it.
  • (5/5)
    Oh the cunning of Satan and his evil minions. Lewis helps us see a large host of ways in which those little buggers can get at us and hopefully helps us be wiser to evil influence!
  • (4/5)
    A thoroughly enjoyable read even for the non-Christian. The Screwtape Letters provide an insightful look at the human tendency to undermine ourselves morally and psychologically. Lewis describes clearly, in plain understandable terms, all the little ways in which we justify and hide our own inadequacies, making ourselves ever more unhappy even in the pursuit of happiness. The book is food for thought even if you don't agree with all the Christian dogma - whether the goal is the salvation of an immortal soul or the attainment of a truly happy and balanced life here on earth, the details are ultimately much the same. What I took away from the book was the idea that no human impulse is inherently good or bad, but each can be shaped by circumstance or will into one or the other. By achieving a clearer awareness of ourselves, and openly acknowledging both our weaknesses and strengths, we are better people for it than if we merely try to smother our weaknesses and pretend to strengths we do not have.I suspect I will return to this book in the future when I need to put life in perspective. Lewis's argument that human beings are ultimately a good bunch and that it is indeed possible to stop screwing yourself over is reassuringly convincing.
  • (3/5)
    "Junior tempter" Wormwood receives excellent instruction in the art and science of ensnaring an unsuspecting human soul in this epistolary theological classic. Wormwood's human "patient", a young British man living through the dark days of World War II, is a new Christian. Wormwood's Uncle Screwtape believes that despite this man's conversion, he could still be brought back into Satan's camp through the proper combination of trying circumstances and demonic manipulation. To this end, the old devil tutors his protege in the exploitation of human weaknesses, such as gluttony, lust and pride.Some find Screwtape's letters witty, even humorous, but I found this short book heavy going at times.
  • (4/5)
    In a series of letters to his nephew, Wormwood, the demon Screwtape provides advice to his nephew on how to tempt an unnamed human and separate him from the Enemy that is God.An interesting approach that is both a good read and prompts some serious thought on any believer's relationship with God.
  • (4/5)
    For a bit of 'inspirational' reading this Christmas, I picked up The Screwtape Letters. I've read some of the Narnia series as well as Mere Christianity by Lewis and I knew the basic gist of Screwtape, but still wasn't 100% sure what was in store for me.The book is a series of letters written by the demon Screwtape to his nephew Wormwood. Both are demons of Hell and the letters are discussions of the practices used to tempt humans and lead them down to Hell rather than letting them make it to Heaven. Wormwood is a junior demon working on tempting a human man in 'contemporary' (to Lewis...~1940s) London. Screwtape is a senior demon no longer doing field work but now in a higher administrative role and full of good advice for the young Wormwood.The book is often humorous as you read about the follies of humans from the point of view of these immortal and immoral tempters. The humorous anecdotes are also subtly invasive as you realize just how true to life these comments are.Screwtape advises Wormwood to take advantage of the foibles of human nature to lead the man down the path to Hell while all the while letting him believe he's on his way to Heaven. The subversive realities these demons try to persuade the human to believe are strangely familiar to the social norms of the world in which we live.Screwtape admonishes that, unless the man is truly vile, Wormwood shouldn't try to push him away from religion but rather let him get puffed up in his religion to the point of self-exhaltation based on his own interpretations. The demons are wary of the truly penitent but are grateful for the many who go through the motions of religion for perception only.There are many good lessons to be learned through the book. Many poignant passages softly chastising humble pride, valueless bravery, hopeless nostalgic dreamers and others.It's a great satire on the state of the world.What was most sad and scary to me is that ~50-60 years later, not much has changed. The same subtle lies are being whispered through the world and countless humans (myself included at times) are believing them and gently paving our own way to Hell.Two other things I found very interesting in this book:
    1. This edition included a short epilogue from C. S. Lewis. In it, he discusses the difficulty of writing from the point of view of a devil. He wrote of the darkness he felt in trying to shed all semblance of goodness in order to portray such a viewpoint. Perhaps one of my favorite themes in the book was that of Screwtape trying to understand "God's Love." He just couldn't believe that God truly loves us and that it is that Love that is at the heart of his motivations. I think Lewis truly threw himself into the role of Screwtape and did a great job embodying the demon. I don't envy him that difficult task.
    2. This edition also included Lewis' one follow up to the Letters. It was a short work called "Screwtape Proposes a Toast" and the setting is a graduation commencement for novice demons just out of training and ready for assignments. Screwtape is giving the commencement speech and toast. His language and themes were again very relevant and honest satires on the world we live in. A few paragraphs really caught my attention...He talked about the education system of humans and ways they (the demons) might undermine it. He talked of standardized testing and lowering the scale to the least common factor such that the most inept student could succeed (only with that bare minimum) while the average and excellent students will leave school with no educational increase. He talked about undermining the true study and learning by replacing it with rote memorization of facts and figures to the point that any ability to truly think would be diminished and thus humans would not be able to see through the flimsy temptations. Sadly, a lot of the language in this section sounded far too similar to the No Child Left Behind legislation and other similar practices in the school system today. How sadly prophetic Lewis was on this front
    I'd be interested to find some analysis of it that helps break out different letters into their themes...maybe I'll work on one. Something that could be used to pull out passages about some of the different temptations: Love/Romance/Sex, Religion, Pride, Nature, etc.Overall, I really enjoyed this novel. There were a few sections that really seemed to drag on but generally it was a lot of fun to read and it left me in a state of deep thinking afterwards. Give it a try.****4 stars
  • (5/5)
    This book addresses certain qualities of mankind. The focus is (of course) on the seven deadly sins, as well as ignorance of history, materialism and general quirks of mankind. All of these focuses are directed towards how they can cause a person to fall into sin and end up in Hell. C.S. Lewis probably meant these warnings from a religious viewpoint. But I was actually able to look at them and find a non-religious aspect to them. From the first page I saw details that can relate to our time today. E.g. people falling into materialism or letting themselves become dumb with novelties and “incompatable philosophies dancing around”. This novel delves into all kinds of beliefs and questions them for the purpose of helping the reader find where they want to be. How does it fit into search for self? (Aside from the previous sentence) The first aspect to answering this question is to address the effect of The Point of View in the novel. As the title states, the novel is composed of Screwtape’s letters. He is not searching for himself, but instead is trying to help his nephew direct a human’s search for self in the direction of Hell. The human, who remains unnamed because that is not important to the point of the novel is tugged by demons and angels alike, both sides trying to direct him towards Hell or Heaven respectively. The man is searching for which side he believes himself to be on. This is the example of search for self. I reccomend this book to anyone religious or not because it has a message we all can take away.
  • (5/5)
    A very clever way to look at Christianity. What kinds of things or attitudes would a devil look for in you that would help him to tempt you? Each letter is a quick read but very thought-provoking ... and humorous!
  • (5/5)
    One of the great works of moral instruction of the past, or any century. Lewis' fame as an explicitly Christian apologist, has led to him being tremendously neglected as a moralist. He understands how our vices from ourselves, how easily we can be swept up in selfishness and pride ourselves on the flimsiest virtues. If you are reading this book honestly, you will at times find it very painful. It is also often very funny. Highly recommended, perhaps even more so for non-Christians (like myself).2.25.09"In the heat of composition I find that I have inadvertently allowed myself to assume the form of a large centipede."
  • (5/5)
    “The Screwtape Letters” was my first foray into the mind of C. S. Lewis and I found it interesting and timeless. Written at the height of WWII in 1942, Lewis’s warnings about the false hope and change of “social justice” and “self-esteem” (then referred to as parity of esteem) have unfortunately become fulfilled predictions. In “Screwtape Proposes a Toast” (added twenty years later) Lewis again points to the then (1962) disturbing trend of everyone being equal, this despite obvious and significant differences. No one can be – or at least can be thought of as being – better than another, and he goes on to reinforce the notion that salvation of Democracies (free people) lies in the salvation of the individual – not the collective. A very refreshing, enlightening and timeless read.
  • (4/5)
    The Screwtape Letters was a stimulating read from both a spiritual and an intellectual view. It is a series of letters sent by a Demon, Screwtape, to his nephew Wormwood (a junior tempter). The letters give a detailed description of the sort of temptations which demons try to side track humans, specifically Christians.This book fits into our English genre of Finding The Self very well. From a Christian perspective, it makes the reader think about how Satan is tempting each of us individually in our own lives. When Screwtape describes a scenario in his letters, the readers begins to think about similar situations in their own lives and how, perhaps, their choices might replicate what Screwtape is describing. That process makes the reader think about themselves, the actions they have done, the choices they have made, and what they will do in the future.I think that this is a must read for any Christian. However, that does not mean non-Christians should be wary of the book. It provides many good messages on morality which non-Christians can and should take to heart. And while the book is not something you would read simply for the enjoyment of the story, it is none-the-less good because of its intellectual nature.
  • (3/5)
    If not for the fact that this is a satire in earnest, it would serve as a powerful absurdist invective against humanity. This book improved my view of Christians in general, but only because it points out that all the faults conspicuous in the rabidly faithful are equally well-represented in the uninformed agnostic, if less readily apparent.The sharp weapon of Lewis's rhetoric tears down humanity through all its self-righteous hubris, denial, misdirected hopes, and easy mistakes. However, one begins to develop the impression, slowly at first, that Lewis has nothing to offer in return. There are scarcely words of alternatives, let alone improvements.Lewis does give us a house which disgusts the devils and redeems the sinful, but this perfect representation of Christian values is just a lack of badness, not a profusion of goodness. It is 'suffused' by some sort of magical glow which infects the cat, but magical glows do not a life philosophy make. I got the impression that Lewis hoped to fill in the good parts later, but couldn't think of any.Human beings have a cognitive bias for avoiding punishment, even to the point where they will avoid a small punishment rather than seek a great reward. Perhaps this fear consumed Lewis, as it does so many people. That would explain why his books seem more concerned with avoiding small errors instead of seeking out grand achievements.Lewis said writing these letters was more difficult than any of his other books, and that he could not bring himself to write a sequel. I find little surprise in this, because one can see how, as the book goes on, Lewis more and more recognizes the failures of mankind but when he tries to express what makes him or his faith any different, cannot find anything to say.The 'suffusing glow' becomes a metaphor for Lewis's own righteousness, but whenever Lewis isn't basking in his own self-righteousness, he is ridiculing someone else's. Lewis' rhetoric is most deficient when he scorns one of man's many faults, then calls it a virtue in the next chapter.For example, the book begins with the demon advising that humans should be encouraged to think of things as being 'real' without ever questioning what that means. The term 'real life' is meant to act as a self-justification for assumptions, not as an introspective view. This is 'bad' because 'real' has no meaning beyond the opinion of the user, and hence it can be used to justify anything.Then Lewis begins to talk about how the Christians should make sure to follow what is 'natural', but fails to define what 'natural' is supposed to mean. Like 'real', 'natural' can be used to justify any idea or position, but Lewis does not turn a skeptical eye to himself.This can hardly surprise, as Lewis maintains a philosophy of Duality. Dualism presents the 'with us/against us' ideal by which any two groups may grow to hate one another despite the fact that they have relatively few differences. As long as one defines the other as bad, there is no need to define the self as good, as in the Dualistic system, there is only good and evil, and you are either one or the other.Lewis often falls back on this defense, showing how some men are bad, how he is different from them, and then assuming 'different' equals 'better'. He uses rational, skeptical argument to show how flawed his opponent is, but tearing down others is not the same as raising yourself up.That being said, it would still be refreshing to meet a believer who had put as much thought and work into attempting to understand and explain themselves. It is rare to find thoughtfulness and skepticism, believer or no. Atheists and scientists can be just as troubled, flawed, and deluded as anyone else.The lesson I will pull from this is that it is important for me to concentrate on myself and my own growth, because worrying about everyone else didn't help Lewis, and it isn't going to help me, either. I must not simply tear down those who are different from me, since this doesn't prove that I am right, any more than a bully proves his superiority by his insults and threats.
  • (4/5)
    A very good book for all those who want to understand, or to embark on a journey of spirituality. Many books have been written from the perspective of God, but not too many have been written from the perspective of demons.As an alternative manner of thought, it provides a delightful read, and poses many questions for us to think about
  • (3/5)
    The Screwtape Letters is a collection of letters from Screwtape, an experienced, senior level demon, to his nephew, Wormwood, on how to tempt his 'patient' away from God. Each of Screwtape's letters offers advice to his nephew on the using the human mind and logic to turn his patient to "Our Father Below". All of the letters analyze the actions and thoughts of humans. Screwtape is the master of reverse theology; however, he doesn't have much patience. This novel connects to our theme because it shows the journey the patient is going thorough as Wormwood tries to destroy his Christianity. In the background of the correspondence between Screwtape and Wormwood, there is the saga of one man’s spiritual battle. He is attempting to find God while dealing with the many temptations presented by Wormwood. His search for himself is the main focus of the two main characters. Overall, The Screwtape Letters was a good book. It presented many interesting ideas and made me think about my own actions and the motivations behind them. However, I found it tended to slow down and drag on at certain points. If you want to see a different perspective on spiritual struggles, then I would recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Lewis adopts the old epistlatory technique to serve his ends of Christian apology, and with delightful results. Whether or not one accepts and agrees with Lewis's theology, his style and method win the reader's approbation.Screwtape is a senior demon in Hell writing advice to his protege on the front lines here on Earth. As Lewis himself remarked, once one hits upon the concept, the execution is fairly easy. Simply take standard moral advice and turn them inside out, upside down, or backwards.
  • (5/5)
    The Screwtape Letters was written by C.S.Lewis in 1942 with WW2 as the backdrop. This is a series of letters (epistolary style literary work) written by Screwtape to his young nephew, Wormwood, advising him on how to secure the soul of 'the patient'. It also contained the sequel, Screwtape Proposes a Toast in which Screwtape addressed the graduating class of tempters. This was published in 1959 and addresses the politics of the post war world. C.S.Lewis uses this satirical format to address the Christian life. Many of the chapters discuss love. Letter 19 addresses God's love for humanity. Letter 26 addresses courtship. I also very much enjoyed the letters on time, reality, music and noise. There is so much in this little book that rereading it many times would not exhaust the nuggets of truth.
  • (4/5)
    A senior devil gives advice on tempting humans to his nephew, a junior devil
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful perspective on man and Satan.