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William Oliver Gant, cuyos antepasados ??se habían asentado en Pennsylvania, había sido aprendiz de cantero. Se trasladó finalmente al Sur y, después de dos matrimonios, llegó a Altamont, pequeña ciudad de montaña que es el equivalente ficcional del Asheville natal del autor. Allí conoció a Eliza Pentland, que venía de una establecida y excéntrica familia de esa región.

Después de un noviazgo formal se casó con ella. Incluso entonces, Gant era un hombre salvaje y exuberante, capaz de borracheras épicas y dueño de una vitalidad indomable. A finales del siglo XIX, con más de 50 años, concibió su último hijo. Con esta introducción extraña y retrospectiva se establecen las circunstancias de los primeros años de Eugene Grant y los eventos de su primera infancia se graban y cuentan extensamente.
Published: Open Road Integrated Media on Apr 15, 2014
ISBN: 9781480493230
List price: $9.99
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I am usually in favor of more stark prose, but this ornate story captured my imagination. The actual plot dragged quite a bit...the protaganist, Eugene Gant, isn't even born until quite a ways into the book. But each little section of the book can almost be taken as a story in itself.read more
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I've read this one twice, and you would think since I have done so, it must rank up there with the literary gods of Danielle Steele and Mary Higgins Clark (LOL). Seriously, I read it first in a southern lit course and then last year I read it again.Overall, Wolfe is a good writer (Faulkner even praise him); there's great description and the redundant "O Lost!" which gradually begins to impinge on one's nerves. I gather a great sense, Wolfe was attempting too much to establish himself as a great writer.There are of course a great deal of scholarly criticism which pretty much equates the main character, Eugene Gant (mind note: I hope I got that right)own coming of age, and Wolfe's own troublesome upbringing.Wolfe's own life was quiet interesting. Some of his novels actually contain the same passages from this work. I heard he wrote his books on the top of a refrigerator.There were times as I read this one I found myself struggling through it, but because I'm from the South, and lived in North Carolina during a portion of my life, I finished it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a nearly impossible book to review. It is at once a classic, an experimental masterpiece, a resounding mess, and a beautiful failure. When I talk about which books inspired me to become a writer I often cite LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN by James Agee. LOOK HOMEWARD ANGEL would, I suspect, have had the same sort of effect on me had I read it when I was a teenager, which is the age at which I read FAMOUS MEN. At such an age, and with the wild, passionate temperament of youth, I thrilled to the elevated (faintly purple) prose, the long passages of meandering, if somewhat superfluous beauty, the self-consciousness, the insistence by the author to include EVERYTHING. But re-reading FAMOUS MEN, and now reading ANGEL as a middle-aged woman I am impatient with the self-indulgence, which in Agee I put down to too much whiskey, but for which I have no such excuse in Wolfe. I find myself skipping passages, which is never a good sign. There is no denying Wolfe's stunning capacity for character depth. The question is, does the story require quite this much depth? If passages were trimmed, if details were pared down to only the very best, would anything have been lost? I suspect not. Faulkner and Kerouac both cited Wolfe as an influence, and I can see that -- the high poetics, the stream-of-consciousness, the young man's unbridled, undisciplined approach to art is obvious. And there is certainly a value in that. I just wish Wolfe had made more choices, instead of flinging everything at the page and then keeping everything. There's something to be said for Oscar Wilde, who "spent the morning putting in a comma, and spent the afternoon taking it out again."I would definitely recommend ANGEL to my fourteen-year-old self. It would have, I think, enhanced my writer's education, and I will recommend it to anyone under the age of 25 who either wants to be a writer or who loves literature. But for those of us who have lived a while, and who have less patience for pyrotechnics, ANGEL is a bit of a slog, albeit a mightily poetic one.read more
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I am usually in favor of more stark prose, but this ornate story captured my imagination. The actual plot dragged quite a bit...the protaganist, Eugene Gant, isn't even born until quite a ways into the book. But each little section of the book can almost be taken as a story in itself.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've read this one twice, and you would think since I have done so, it must rank up there with the literary gods of Danielle Steele and Mary Higgins Clark (LOL). Seriously, I read it first in a southern lit course and then last year I read it again.Overall, Wolfe is a good writer (Faulkner even praise him); there's great description and the redundant "O Lost!" which gradually begins to impinge on one's nerves. I gather a great sense, Wolfe was attempting too much to establish himself as a great writer.There are of course a great deal of scholarly criticism which pretty much equates the main character, Eugene Gant (mind note: I hope I got that right)own coming of age, and Wolfe's own troublesome upbringing.Wolfe's own life was quiet interesting. Some of his novels actually contain the same passages from this work. I heard he wrote his books on the top of a refrigerator.There were times as I read this one I found myself struggling through it, but because I'm from the South, and lived in North Carolina during a portion of my life, I finished it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a nearly impossible book to review. It is at once a classic, an experimental masterpiece, a resounding mess, and a beautiful failure. When I talk about which books inspired me to become a writer I often cite LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN by James Agee. LOOK HOMEWARD ANGEL would, I suspect, have had the same sort of effect on me had I read it when I was a teenager, which is the age at which I read FAMOUS MEN. At such an age, and with the wild, passionate temperament of youth, I thrilled to the elevated (faintly purple) prose, the long passages of meandering, if somewhat superfluous beauty, the self-consciousness, the insistence by the author to include EVERYTHING. But re-reading FAMOUS MEN, and now reading ANGEL as a middle-aged woman I am impatient with the self-indulgence, which in Agee I put down to too much whiskey, but for which I have no such excuse in Wolfe. I find myself skipping passages, which is never a good sign. There is no denying Wolfe's stunning capacity for character depth. The question is, does the story require quite this much depth? If passages were trimmed, if details were pared down to only the very best, would anything have been lost? I suspect not. Faulkner and Kerouac both cited Wolfe as an influence, and I can see that -- the high poetics, the stream-of-consciousness, the young man's unbridled, undisciplined approach to art is obvious. And there is certainly a value in that. I just wish Wolfe had made more choices, instead of flinging everything at the page and then keeping everything. There's something to be said for Oscar Wilde, who "spent the morning putting in a comma, and spent the afternoon taking it out again."I would definitely recommend ANGEL to my fourteen-year-old self. It would have, I think, enhanced my writer's education, and I will recommend it to anyone under the age of 25 who either wants to be a writer or who loves literature. But for those of us who have lived a while, and who have less patience for pyrotechnics, ANGEL is a bit of a slog, albeit a mightily poetic one.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Contradictory word vomit.
Whole passages with no point or relevance.
Don't know what he's talking about when he goes on a tangent from the story. He assumes the reader can follow his train of thought.
"This must be good writing, because it seems so very dull." I assume this is Wolfe's take on why he thought he wrote a classic?
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It was a major struggle to get through the incredibly dense writing, but worth it.
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Wolfe's first and greatest novel. A heartfelt and well done telling of his unusually intense youth in the mountains of North Carolina. Great American prose writing.
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