Zen and The Art of Computer Security by Johnny Sprang - Read Online
Zen and The Art of Computer Security
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Zen and the Art of Computer Security will provide you with information on how to protect yourself on line. There are an ever increasing number of hackers and data thieves just waiting to steal your personal information and other data that they can use for their own ill gotten gains. The more honest people use the internet to do their shopping, banking, and other activities of a personal nature the more you are at risk of a thief stealing your personal information. The internet is a play ground for just about any kind of scam or fraud program you can think of including prime bank fraud, offshore investment scams, programs involving tax fraud, and foreign currency scams to name a few. There are new ones popping up all the time. This useful book will enlighten you about spyware programs, e-mail scams, phishing and spoofing, and other types of internet scams. You will also learn about electronic pyramid schemes, the computerized Trojan horse, and key loggers. You will gain awareness of internet fraud and the computer technology that drives it. You should always be vigilant when it comes to your money and credit. If you are concerned about using your cards on line, the number of records and accounts hacked are steadily going down each year due to advanced technologies in security infrastructure. This book will also provide you with information n how to use your credit and debit cards wisely and safely when purchasing on line. You will also learn how to protect your social security number, your financial records, and safeguard your checkbook as well as other financial information. There is information you need to know about credit and debit card skimming devices, the technology that supports it, and what to look out for. You will also learn what actions to take if you have been a victim of identity theft. You will become enlightened regarding your rights provided by the Electronic Funds Transfer Act and the Fair Credit Billing Act. You learn about fraud alerts and how they can help you. An extensive list of resources and contacts are also available as well as information on the Fair Information Practice and Principles.

Published: Johnny Sprang on
ISBN: 9781310247972
List price: $2.99
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Zen and The Art of Computer Security - Johnny Sprang

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ONE

On Line Security

"When you know better you do better." Maya Angelou

Computers come in many shapes and sizes with varying degrees of abilities and so do their users. Every day it seems the number of computer users increases and more people are on line than ever before. Unfortunately there are an ever increasing number of hackers and data thieves just waiting to steal your personal information and other data that they can use for their own ill gotten gains. The more honest people use the internet to do their shopping, banking, and other activities of a personal nature the more you are at risk of a thief stealing your personal information.

You should always be vigilant when it comes to your money and credit. If you are concerned about using your cards on line, then you may be surprised to know that according to Julie Conroy McNelley (senior fraud and risk analyst at the research firm Aite Group) using the internet to bank, buy music, or shop is still as safe or safer than visiting brick and mortar locations, as long as consumers take precautions and know what to do if they notice any suspicious activity. The number of records and accounts hacked are steadily going down each year due to advanced technologies in security infrastructure. She goes on to say, banks have some of the most sophisticated mechanisms in place. McNelley brings up another good point regarding fraud; she says many breaches involve databases of card numbers that exist regardless of how card holders use their accounts. Geoff Webb, an executive at the data protection firm Credant Technologies, says it’s actually extremely difficult to know how secure any bank’s information handling is. The main reason for this is according to Webb, banks often don’t share much about their security techniques, since they don’t want to tip off criminals on how best to attack them. Whether they talk about it or not, financial firms should be encrypting data, segregating credit card information from other types of data, and making web applications as secure as possible. Regular training of employees is also key.

Are You Spying on Me?

The first and final thing you have to do in this world is to last in it, and not to be smashed by it. Ernest Hemingway

Spyware is a program designed to spy on you, or rather your computer habits, and it is a problem in an exploding global marketplace. Spyware employs very aggressive spying and advertising manipulation of your internet surfing habits. According to Web Root Software Inc., it is approaching the two billion dollar threshold.

The National Cyber Security Alliance has stated that spyware infects more than ninety percent of all personal computers today. It’s kind of like a spyware program that has stealth capabilities, most of the time you won’t even know it’s there, but boy they are nasty little cyber gremlins that have the ability to bypass anti-virus software and firewalls. After the spyware program has found its way into your computer it can create chaos with your system’s performance and gather your personal information. The upside, I guess if there is one, would be that a spyware program cannot reproduce or mutate like a virus or a worm.

The most common way for your computer to have spyware is because you downloaded and installed it. You might be thinking I wouldn’t download or install something like that, and of course you wouldn’t, knowingly. If you have ever downloaded and installed a shareware program or a freeware program, chances are there was a spyware program attached or embedded with it, and like I said before, you wouldn’t even know it. After the spyware program has been installed it goes to work quietly in the background collecting your personal data for the spyware program creator’s personal use.

Sometimes a spyware program will infect your computer by tricking you. The Internet Explorer web browser was actually programmed to prevent web sites from starting downloads, you have to click on a link to start the download, and the problem is that link could be deceptive. Here’s an example; you’re surfing the internet and you’re checking out a web site, a box pops up on your screen and asks you if you would like to increase your internet browsing speed. You notice there is a box for yes and a box for no, but it doesn’t matter which one you click on, you’ll download the spyware, and so the best way to handle this is by clicking on the ‘x’ in the upper right corner of the browser and shut it down. One last note,