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The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids draws upon the entirety of Brad's research and professional experience. In his career he has surveyed over 100,000 children and adolescents, personally interviewing close to 4,000 in group and one-on-one sessions, and run direct service programs in major cities nationwide. He breaks down barriers between the generations and present tweens and teens as they really are. Brad distills the best information on child development, media use, delinquency and morality into five simple truths that will help parents better understand and appreciate the young people in their lives while providing strategies for addressing everyday concerns in positive and productive ways. Brad doesn't place the danger with kids, rather he thinks the danger lies with the sensationalized media about tweens and teens. The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids is based on solid research, but Brad's writing is easy to digest and punctuated with anecdotes from his own experience counseling kids, working within juvenile prisons, and developing television programs and video games. Some of it is funny, most of it is practical, but all of it is important to anyone who cares about kids.
Published: Demos Health on Jan 1, 2012
ISBN: 9781936303397
List price: $16.95
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As the parent of 4 kids (and raised 2 others), I am an avid reader of parenting books seeking tips and ideas for being a good parent. The book has a lot of psychological reporting and survey information for those who value research focused information over anecdotal advice. However, data must be interpreted properly to yield good advice. The basic premise: kids are good and parents need to parent is sound but not new. The research data provides great insight into the habits of young people that often contrasts with media sensationalized stories and TV/movie dramas. There are probably more positive trends among young people than we realize though we must be diligent to direct children towards good decision making. The author expounds simple truths that seem grounded with research and common sense but it mainly reinforced what I've read in other parenting books. If you want to see the latest research on young people's behaviors and related parenting principles, it is a good resource.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids by R. Bradley Snyder was a quick read that many educators and parents would find quite informative and useful. As a school counselor I appreciated the main theme of the book which is that all kids are basically good. Often times are jobs as school counselors are spent dealing with problems and issues that come up with students. It is nice to hear validation from a well-educated author that kids are good! Things are not as bad as the media would make them out to be. Snyder provides great advice on dealing with timely issues surrounding the youth of today such as cell phone usage, bullying, television and video games. The recommendations given are easy to apply and extremely helpful.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's a simple book. The first part deals with what research says about children and topics like sex, bullying, culture, etc...The author argues against the common assessment that children are worse now than back in parents time. It's not so convincing but he is very reasonable. The last half of the book deals with the issues children face: sex, texting, video games, tv and bullying. He gives commom sense tips. A few things that are common sense that need mentioning are: children need adults! But he also says parents need to be adults. He argues that parents want to be kids friends and thus kids end up being like the adults. Not a bad book! Easy reading.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was pretty basic. Roughly 125 pages, so nothing new. Aimed at parents of "tweens/teens". If you are a parent of a child in either of these categories and you find this book enlightening I'm not sure where you've been.... Having said that the chapters on TV and social networks were ok. I found the author a bit pompous and at least one comment (directed at teachers) was downright offensive. Overall I don't recommend spending money on this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids embraces the following assumptions: Kids are Kids, Kids are Good, Kids need parents, Kids need adults, and Kids need communities. This parenting manual is not rocket science, it does not bring to light some amazing, never-before-seen techniques, it basically attempts to draw parents back to the basics. R. Bradley Snyder identifies several modern-day issues that 21st century adolescents are faced with, and points out the error in fearing these issues. Society is not being shaped by the evils of television, texting, social media, and video games. However, if these electronic devices replace parenting and community, they can have negative effects. It all boils down to embracing the truth that kids are still kids, they are basically good, and they need parents, adults, and community in their lives.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is an easy read that covers some basic principles on how to relate to kids. The style is straight forward and recommendations balance instilling 'empowerment' and 'accountability'. I think it could be most helpful in providing conversation starters between kids' caretakers to align on the best ways to help the kids experience life. The book does not push 'identical' practices, but rather it could be used to reinforce the damage of 'conflicting' styles/expectations.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As a parent of a 6-year-old and 9-year-old, I'm not quite into the demographic that this author is writing for, but it isn't far away for me. I found it to be a quick and interesting read. Most of his points are not new or revolutionary or anything like that, but he lays it out clearly and provides good data as well as anecdotes to support his points. One thing I found pertinent for me was his emphasis on the need for parents to be what he calls the three P's: patient, present, and persistent. These things can be hard for me. It's easy to put a kid in front of the tv or computer or videogame device and then just go do my own thing. Much harder to be present with them while they watch/play. It's also hard to be patient and persistent with talking to kids about stuff like tv, games, bullying. I imagine this only gets worse as kids grow toward the sullen teen years.Another interesting point to me was about how kids prefer to learn and how videogames in particular are tailored to that, in ways that school isn't. He writes that kids need learning tasks to be hard, but not too hard, and to increase in difficulty over time, building on skills already learned, and to provide rewards/incentives for accomplishment (points, levels). This definitely describes almost every game that my 9-year-old likes to play (e.g. Angry Birds) -- they start off simple and slowly get more complicated as you gain skill and level up. I found this insight really useful and it has helped me adjust how I respond to my son's constant requests for more "screen time."I don't think that any at least moderately aware parent is going to find anything earthshattering in here, but I found it a valuable read overall.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The 5 simple truths of raising kids are this: Kids are Kids. Kids are Good. Kids need Parents. Kids need Adults. Kids need Communities.For parents and others who may be shaking their heads at "kids these day," Snyder offers a positive perspective, backed up by statistics, that may be reassuring. I think it'd be a great book to give to a concerned grandparent, for example. Snyder is in marketing, and it shows. As a mental health professional-turned-Mom, I would have preferred a more balanced look at the research. Snyder chose to include the studies that fit in with his personal (pro-television, pro-video games) opinion and ignore pretty much everything else. And I never did figure out the bizarre segment on Dancing With the Stars (p. 54), which reads more like a teen essay than a book for adults, who may or may not be familiar with the TV show or the celebrities that Snyder uses as examples. So, maybe not the best choice for the grandparents, after all.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this book to be an interesting read. The author is repetitive, but not in a bad way. He takes the simple truths and continually applies them to different situations. It is almost as if he is drilling the concept into your mind so that it sticks and so that you can apply it to your own situation. I think he explained the concepts well and backed up his ideas with solid research.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Overall I thought Mr Snyder does a good job on driving home his principals. He provides data to put to rest many of the fears that parents today have about the technology world kids live in. He uses the same argument as the NRA - TV doesn't make children obese, parents do (a.k.a. guns don't kill people, people do). But things like obesity is up, face-to-face social skills are down as children lock up in the technology. He does make strong statement on controlling these, but also goes out of the way to excuse them. Although I see his point, in today's world of both parents working to keep the roof over their heads, he seems to provide advice for the old idyllic world of every home with a stay at home parent to watch over the kiddies. Still there is lots of good advice that I hope to use. One unintentional laughable part of the book is his suggestion on providing your children applications to request permission for watching TV programs. And then having a sit down review immediately after the program to go over character development, etc. I wonder if Mr Snyder's home is run like a corporation or a home? :)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An easy read filled with extremely useful information in this ever changing world. As a mother of a toddler and an elementary school teacher, I still found the content to be helpful, even though I don't have a tween or teen yet. The information was helpful to read now so that I am better prepared as a teacher and so I am more informed when my daughter is a tween and teen.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
My wife and I found this book very helpful. We have a tween and a teen and this book helped us look at our relationship in a new way. We used it along with our children to open a dialog with them about things we had not thought of asking. We highly recommend this book to all who have children or a planning on having children.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

As the parent of 4 kids (and raised 2 others), I am an avid reader of parenting books seeking tips and ideas for being a good parent. The book has a lot of psychological reporting and survey information for those who value research focused information over anecdotal advice. However, data must be interpreted properly to yield good advice. The basic premise: kids are good and parents need to parent is sound but not new. The research data provides great insight into the habits of young people that often contrasts with media sensationalized stories and TV/movie dramas. There are probably more positive trends among young people than we realize though we must be diligent to direct children towards good decision making. The author expounds simple truths that seem grounded with research and common sense but it mainly reinforced what I've read in other parenting books. If you want to see the latest research on young people's behaviors and related parenting principles, it is a good resource.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids by R. Bradley Snyder was a quick read that many educators and parents would find quite informative and useful. As a school counselor I appreciated the main theme of the book which is that all kids are basically good. Often times are jobs as school counselors are spent dealing with problems and issues that come up with students. It is nice to hear validation from a well-educated author that kids are good! Things are not as bad as the media would make them out to be. Snyder provides great advice on dealing with timely issues surrounding the youth of today such as cell phone usage, bullying, television and video games. The recommendations given are easy to apply and extremely helpful.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's a simple book. The first part deals with what research says about children and topics like sex, bullying, culture, etc...The author argues against the common assessment that children are worse now than back in parents time. It's not so convincing but he is very reasonable. The last half of the book deals with the issues children face: sex, texting, video games, tv and bullying. He gives commom sense tips. A few things that are common sense that need mentioning are: children need adults! But he also says parents need to be adults. He argues that parents want to be kids friends and thus kids end up being like the adults. Not a bad book! Easy reading.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book was pretty basic. Roughly 125 pages, so nothing new. Aimed at parents of "tweens/teens". If you are a parent of a child in either of these categories and you find this book enlightening I'm not sure where you've been.... Having said that the chapters on TV and social networks were ok. I found the author a bit pompous and at least one comment (directed at teachers) was downright offensive. Overall I don't recommend spending money on this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The 5 Simple Truths of Raising Kids embraces the following assumptions: Kids are Kids, Kids are Good, Kids need parents, Kids need adults, and Kids need communities. This parenting manual is not rocket science, it does not bring to light some amazing, never-before-seen techniques, it basically attempts to draw parents back to the basics. R. Bradley Snyder identifies several modern-day issues that 21st century adolescents are faced with, and points out the error in fearing these issues. Society is not being shaped by the evils of television, texting, social media, and video games. However, if these electronic devices replace parenting and community, they can have negative effects. It all boils down to embracing the truth that kids are still kids, they are basically good, and they need parents, adults, and community in their lives.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is an easy read that covers some basic principles on how to relate to kids. The style is straight forward and recommendations balance instilling 'empowerment' and 'accountability'. I think it could be most helpful in providing conversation starters between kids' caretakers to align on the best ways to help the kids experience life. The book does not push 'identical' practices, but rather it could be used to reinforce the damage of 'conflicting' styles/expectations.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As a parent of a 6-year-old and 9-year-old, I'm not quite into the demographic that this author is writing for, but it isn't far away for me. I found it to be a quick and interesting read. Most of his points are not new or revolutionary or anything like that, but he lays it out clearly and provides good data as well as anecdotes to support his points. One thing I found pertinent for me was his emphasis on the need for parents to be what he calls the three P's: patient, present, and persistent. These things can be hard for me. It's easy to put a kid in front of the tv or computer or videogame device and then just go do my own thing. Much harder to be present with them while they watch/play. It's also hard to be patient and persistent with talking to kids about stuff like tv, games, bullying. I imagine this only gets worse as kids grow toward the sullen teen years.Another interesting point to me was about how kids prefer to learn and how videogames in particular are tailored to that, in ways that school isn't. He writes that kids need learning tasks to be hard, but not too hard, and to increase in difficulty over time, building on skills already learned, and to provide rewards/incentives for accomplishment (points, levels). This definitely describes almost every game that my 9-year-old likes to play (e.g. Angry Birds) -- they start off simple and slowly get more complicated as you gain skill and level up. I found this insight really useful and it has helped me adjust how I respond to my son's constant requests for more "screen time."I don't think that any at least moderately aware parent is going to find anything earthshattering in here, but I found it a valuable read overall.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The 5 simple truths of raising kids are this: Kids are Kids. Kids are Good. Kids need Parents. Kids need Adults. Kids need Communities.For parents and others who may be shaking their heads at "kids these day," Snyder offers a positive perspective, backed up by statistics, that may be reassuring. I think it'd be a great book to give to a concerned grandparent, for example. Snyder is in marketing, and it shows. As a mental health professional-turned-Mom, I would have preferred a more balanced look at the research. Snyder chose to include the studies that fit in with his personal (pro-television, pro-video games) opinion and ignore pretty much everything else. And I never did figure out the bizarre segment on Dancing With the Stars (p. 54), which reads more like a teen essay than a book for adults, who may or may not be familiar with the TV show or the celebrities that Snyder uses as examples. So, maybe not the best choice for the grandparents, after all.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this book to be an interesting read. The author is repetitive, but not in a bad way. He takes the simple truths and continually applies them to different situations. It is almost as if he is drilling the concept into your mind so that it sticks and so that you can apply it to your own situation. I think he explained the concepts well and backed up his ideas with solid research.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Overall I thought Mr Snyder does a good job on driving home his principals. He provides data to put to rest many of the fears that parents today have about the technology world kids live in. He uses the same argument as the NRA - TV doesn't make children obese, parents do (a.k.a. guns don't kill people, people do). But things like obesity is up, face-to-face social skills are down as children lock up in the technology. He does make strong statement on controlling these, but also goes out of the way to excuse them. Although I see his point, in today's world of both parents working to keep the roof over their heads, he seems to provide advice for the old idyllic world of every home with a stay at home parent to watch over the kiddies. Still there is lots of good advice that I hope to use. One unintentional laughable part of the book is his suggestion on providing your children applications to request permission for watching TV programs. And then having a sit down review immediately after the program to go over character development, etc. I wonder if Mr Snyder's home is run like a corporation or a home? :)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An easy read filled with extremely useful information in this ever changing world. As a mother of a toddler and an elementary school teacher, I still found the content to be helpful, even though I don't have a tween or teen yet. The information was helpful to read now so that I am better prepared as a teacher and so I am more informed when my daughter is a tween and teen.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
My wife and I found this book very helpful. We have a tween and a teen and this book helped us look at our relationship in a new way. We used it along with our children to open a dialog with them about things we had not thought of asking. We highly recommend this book to all who have children or a planning on having children.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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