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From the Publisher

Varla Ventura, Coast to Coast favorite, Weird News blogger on Huffington Post, and author of The Book of the Bizarre and Beyond Bizarre, introduces Weiser Books’ new Collection of forgotten occult classics. Paranormal Parlor is an eerie assemblage of affordable digital editions, curated with Varla’s sixth sense for tales of the weird and unusual.

Leadbeater’s Clairvoyance in Time is your password, your library card to the âkâshic record. Admission is free (beyond what you paid for this book and whatever you may need to spend to devote yourself to the practice of meditation), and the library is open 24/7 to any mystics dedicated enough to think their way through the front door.

Published: Red Wheel Weiser on
ISBN: 9781619400306
List price: $0.99
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