• book
    0% of Writing Children's Books For Dummies completed

From the Publisher

Everything aspiring authors need to write, publish, and sell achildren's book

Everyone loves a children's book—and many dream aboutwriting one. But is it actually possible for an unpublishedwriter—armed with a good story idea and a love ofkids—to write, sell, publish, and promote a book? Yes, itis!

Clearly and concisely written with straightforward advice and aplethora of specific up-to-date recommendations, WritingChildren's Books For Dummies provides step-by-step informationon everything aspiring children's book authors need toknow—from researching the current marketplace to developingstory ideas, strengthening writing skills, dealing with editors,and submitting proposals and manuscripts to agents andpublishers.

Updated and improved writing exercises All new content on social media and establishing an onlinepresence as an author Fresh, updated content on publishing via hard copy and all thee- platforms

From setting down that first word on paper to doing a successfulpublicity tour, Writing Children's Books For Dummies givesyou the confidence and the insiders' know-how to write and sell thestory you've always wanted to write.

Topics: Writing, Creativity, Professional Development, Goals & Aspirations, Writers, How-To Guides, and Informative

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9781118460023
List price: $19.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Writing Children's Books For Dummies
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
10 min read

The Deep Space of Digital Reading: Why we shouldn’t worry about leaving print behind.

In A History of Reading, the Canadian novelist and essayist Alberto Manguel describes a remarkable transformation of human consciousness, which took place around the 10th century A.D.: the advent of silent reading. Human beings have been reading for thousands of years, but in antiquity, the normal thing was to read aloud. When Augustine (the future St. Augustine) went to see his teacher, Ambrose, in Milan, in 384 A.D., he was stunned to see him looking at a book and not saying anything. With the advent of silent reading, Manguel writes, ... the reader was at last able to establish an unrestric
Literary Hub
2 min read

Pamela Paul On The Beauty Of A Disorganized Bookshelf

Paul Holdengraber talks to New York Times Book Review editor Pamela Paul about her new book, My Life With Bob, the relationship between authors and readers, library books, backpacking through China, developing empathy though reading novels, un-organizing bookshelves, the Invisible Institute, and the sad fact that you’re never finished reading—or writing.     Pamela Paul on the different lenses through which to view writers I’m editing these writers in my work here at the Times, I’m reading them as a reader, and then professionally I’m also a writer, so I can relate to them, although I don’t
Nautilus
7 min read

Paper Versus Pixel: The science of reading shows that print and digital experiences are complementary.

On the occasion of the inaugural Nautilus Quarterly, we asked Nicholas Carr to survey the prospects for a print publication. Here he shows why asking if digital publications will supplant printed ones is the wrong question.   Gutenberg we know. But what of the eunuch Cai Lun? A well-educated, studious young man, a close aide to the Emperor Hedi in the Chinese imperial court of the Eastern Han Dynasty, Cai invented paper one fateful day in the year 105 A.D. At the time, writing and drawing were done primarily on silk, which was elegant but expensive, or on bamboo, which was sturdy but cumbersom