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From the Publisher

Millions of Americans have to train others as part of their jobs.Whether you’re an employee training your co-workers on a newprocess or skill, a volunteer asked to train new volunteers, a cheftraining your staff, or a paramedic giving CPR training, it’sjust as important to know how to teach others as it is to know whatyou’re talking about. It doesn’t matter how much youknow about your subject if you can’t share it with others.

Fortunately, Training For Dummies offers all the nuts andbolts of training for anyone who has to educate others on anysubject and in any field. It covers all the modern, interactiveinstructional methods and dynamic training approaches available andhelps you get trainees inspired, involved, and enthused.Training For Dummies will help you:

Keep it interesting so trainees learn more eagerly Master the jargon of training Use audio and visual aids effectively Prepare for the training certification process Evaluate your results and improve your tactics

Elaine Biech, President and Managing Principal of EbbAssociates, Inc., and known as “the trainer’strainer” shows you all the tips and tricks of the trade.Based on her long experience as a trainer and her work for clientssuch as the IRS and many Fortune 500 companies, Biech helps youdiscover:

Tips, techniques, and tidbits for enhancing your trainingsessions Methods that improve trainee participation Alternatives to the traditional lecture method Tactics for gauging and managing group dynamics Strategies for addressing problems in the classroom Hints for understanding and adapting to different learningstyles Helpful resources and other extra material you can put toimmediate use

No matter what you do for a living, there will probably come atime when you have to teach others what you know. Training ForDummies cuts through the complicated jargon to present thebasics of teaching and learning in straightforward, plain Englishso you can share your specialized knowledge with those who needit.

Topics: Career, Communication, Informative, Prescriptive, Guides, and Professional Development

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9781118054185
List price: $21.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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