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Editor’s Note

“Run Better...”

Learn from ultra-marathoner Danny Dreyer's low-injury, high-impact exercise that blends running with the core principles of mindful disciplines & restorative practice.
Scribd Editor
The revised edition of the bestselling ChiRunning, a groundbreaking program from ultra-marathoner and nationally-known coach Danny Dreyer, that teaches you how to run faster and farther with less effort, and to prevent and heal injuries for runners of any age or fitness level.

In ChiRunning, Danny and Katherine Dreyer, well-known walking and running coaches, provide powerful insight that transforms running from a high-injury sport to a body-friendly, injury-free fitness phenomenon. ChiRunning employs the deep power reserves in the core muscles, an approach found in disciplines such as yoga, Pilates, and T’ai Chi.

ChiRunning enables you to develop a personalized exercise program by blending running with the powerful mind-body principles of T’ai Chi:

1. Get aligned. Develop great posture and reduce your potential for injury while running, and make knee pain and shin splints a thing of the past.

2. Engage your core. Shift the workload from your leg muscles to your core muscles, for efficiency and speed.

3. Add relaxation to your running. Learn to focus your mind and relax your body to increase speed and distance.

4. Make it a Mindful Practice. Maintain high performance and make running a mindful, enjoyable life-long practice.

5. It’s easy to learn. Transform your running with the ten-step ChiRunning training program.

Topics: Exercise, Mindfulness, Injuries, The Outdoors, How-To Guides, and Inspirational

Published: Touchstone on
ISBN: 9781439164549
List price: $11.99
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I haven't read many running books and I suspect they have similarities, in that a large part of the beginning of the book was dedicated to telling us how excellent "Chi running" is. It's subtitled "A Revolutionary Approach to Effortless, Injury-Free Running". Basically, it's an anti- what he calls "power running" (building up muscles for running which are then a) heavy to move around b) restrictive of joint movement) and a call for a more flexible, tai-chi based idea of body-awareness, being in the moment and lightness of foot. Amongst the tai-chi theory (which is not pushed down your throat) and the slightly alien concept of running while inclined forwards, which is meant to make gravity help you run and avoid heel-striking (I'm going to try that in my run today) there is a lot of sensible and useful stuff - some great exercises for loosening up the joints and tendons, which I will be taking on board (some of the "loosening up" exercises are suspiciously similar to the usual runners' stretches) and some good solid advice on building form then distance then speed and preparing for a race. I was pleased to see I am already an exponent of some of his theories (keeping loose, body aware and relaxed on a downhill run, keeping the arms relaxed etc) but I would imagine most runners would fit this category in some way. Nice to see he recommends looking at yourself in a shop window to check posture - how I miss our Woolworths and McDonalds on the High Street for that!Still, an inspiring read, as I find the magazines and the other book I've read, and some good stuff to take away and try.more
If you ever studied T'ai Chi Ch'uan for at least for a few months you'll probably agree with the author on many points. The book provides valuable tips for developing a rather effortless running style based on the principles of T'ai Chi. It was interesting read for me because I have never taught about applying my T'ai Chi experience to running. Now that the book presents the big picture I can see easily.But of course don't expect any magic happen instantly. The book is repetitive and there's a point to it, you need to be repetitive in some sense, too in order to benefit. You have to be actively monitoring what you're doing, too. If you are a runner and decide to attend to some T'ai Chi classes after this book you are going to understand what it is all about. Maybe the most important part of the book was the part where the author talked about the faces of children as they were running. Children are very relaxed and have fun. (And then we learn how to be stiff, stressed and focused on wrong things which takes a lot of training to get rid of).more
I picked up ChiRunning after just having hurt my foot from over-running it. Wrapping my head around the different methods used was difficult at first, but the new approach has proven very helpful. Many people already viewed some of my running methods as unconventional so testing out this new form of mechanics was not a big step. This book, along with a few others, have changed the way that I look toward training in athletics. Form comes first, and speed or distance flow out of a good form. Also, a big fundamental piece of the puzzle is that power flows out from the core, not the extremities.more
This book applies the anatomical principles of Taijiquan to running which is a good thing. Relaxation, centeredness and economy of movement. However if you are looking for how to use CHI in running them look elsewhere. I think the name ChiRunning is used simply to link Taijiquan and running. more
Read all 4 reviews

Reviews

I haven't read many running books and I suspect they have similarities, in that a large part of the beginning of the book was dedicated to telling us how excellent "Chi running" is. It's subtitled "A Revolutionary Approach to Effortless, Injury-Free Running". Basically, it's an anti- what he calls "power running" (building up muscles for running which are then a) heavy to move around b) restrictive of joint movement) and a call for a more flexible, tai-chi based idea of body-awareness, being in the moment and lightness of foot. Amongst the tai-chi theory (which is not pushed down your throat) and the slightly alien concept of running while inclined forwards, which is meant to make gravity help you run and avoid heel-striking (I'm going to try that in my run today) there is a lot of sensible and useful stuff - some great exercises for loosening up the joints and tendons, which I will be taking on board (some of the "loosening up" exercises are suspiciously similar to the usual runners' stretches) and some good solid advice on building form then distance then speed and preparing for a race. I was pleased to see I am already an exponent of some of his theories (keeping loose, body aware and relaxed on a downhill run, keeping the arms relaxed etc) but I would imagine most runners would fit this category in some way. Nice to see he recommends looking at yourself in a shop window to check posture - how I miss our Woolworths and McDonalds on the High Street for that!Still, an inspiring read, as I find the magazines and the other book I've read, and some good stuff to take away and try.more
If you ever studied T'ai Chi Ch'uan for at least for a few months you'll probably agree with the author on many points. The book provides valuable tips for developing a rather effortless running style based on the principles of T'ai Chi. It was interesting read for me because I have never taught about applying my T'ai Chi experience to running. Now that the book presents the big picture I can see easily.But of course don't expect any magic happen instantly. The book is repetitive and there's a point to it, you need to be repetitive in some sense, too in order to benefit. You have to be actively monitoring what you're doing, too. If you are a runner and decide to attend to some T'ai Chi classes after this book you are going to understand what it is all about. Maybe the most important part of the book was the part where the author talked about the faces of children as they were running. Children are very relaxed and have fun. (And then we learn how to be stiff, stressed and focused on wrong things which takes a lot of training to get rid of).more
I picked up ChiRunning after just having hurt my foot from over-running it. Wrapping my head around the different methods used was difficult at first, but the new approach has proven very helpful. Many people already viewed some of my running methods as unconventional so testing out this new form of mechanics was not a big step. This book, along with a few others, have changed the way that I look toward training in athletics. Form comes first, and speed or distance flow out of a good form. Also, a big fundamental piece of the puzzle is that power flows out from the core, not the extremities.more
This book applies the anatomical principles of Taijiquan to running which is a good thing. Relaxation, centeredness and economy of movement. However if you are looking for how to use CHI in running them look elsewhere. I think the name ChiRunning is used simply to link Taijiquan and running. more
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