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The Blood of Lambs reveals the true inside story of the making and mind-set of a Muslim terrorist. Though his ties with terrorism were severed more than twenty years ago, it was not until 9/11, when radical Muslims rained terror on American shores, that Kamal Saleem stepped out of the shadows and revealed his true identity. Today, he is a different kind of warrior. He now stands on the wall and shouts to America, "Open your eyes and fight the danger that lives among you."

As the terrible fruit of Kamal's early life in jihad screams from today's headlines, he courageously puts his life on the line to defend America, the country he now calls home.
Published: Howard Books on Apr 7, 2009
ISBN: 9781439159286
List price: $16.99
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The only thing that troubled me about this book--I just don't see how a 50-year-old man can write with such vivid recall about events that happened when he was 7 years old and younger. So sometimes it comes across as quite embellished, and I found myself wondering if perhaps it was even partly fabricated. Nonetheless, it's a fascinating story of what God can do and that no one is truly beyond His reach. And I'm inclined to think that Saleem is right about the sinister intents of radical (and even those not so radical) Muslims. His warning about America's apathy in the face of grave danger is surely on target.read more
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The Blood of the Lambs by Kamal Saleem is a perplexing read. The description of a terrorist’s lifestyle: calculated murder, extortion, bloody urban warfare and bigoted hatred was shocking but expected. However, the authenticity of the story didn't ring true with me. Mr. Saleem describes his humble, ultra-conservative Islamic upbringing as a neglected, exploited child among many siblings. His vulnerability led to his recruitment at the age of seven into the Muslim Brotherhood. As his terrorist life-style develops he is propelled into a quagmire of criminal behavior. Eventually he has a life-changing experience which causes him to reconsider his beliefs. I took extra time after finishing this book to absorb the stories Mr. Saleem presented but I had more questions than answers. How did Mr. Saleem, an uneducated child from such an unsophisticated background, develop the manners necessary to mix with the jet-set, and brush shoulders with wealthy sheikhs? How did he acquire the refinement to marry well? Where were the educational credentials that enabled his skilled careers? Red flags appear everywhere.The author contends that the purpose of his book is to warn Americans about the destructive "cancer" which is destroying the country from within while we passively and naïvely encourage cultural diversity. While I question the truthfulness and motives of this book, I do accept the premise that we must be alert citizens while living in a dangerous world.I received this book through the Library Thing Early Reviewer program. The Blood of the Lambs by Kamal Saleem kept my attention to the end but I wouldn’t recommend this book to serious readers.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Born in Beirut, Lebanon, Kamal Saleem details his life growing up, the incidents leading him to terrorism, his life as a terrorist, and eventually his retirement.What I have found most interesting about Saleem's story is what led him to terrorism. Nothing so grandiose, nothing that had him shaking his fist at the sky swearing revenge because of some despicable acts. It was much more mundane. Saleem, in short, fell into it. He grew up in a poor, devout Muslim family. As part of his upbringing he would be taught stories and lessons from the Koran every week and a gerat many of these stories involved warriors slaying Allah's enemies in battle, usually Jews and Christians (bigoted teachings aside, he did have Christian friends, it being Beirut in the 60s). Naturally, Saleem being a young boy, would day dream endlessly about being a warrior and fighting glorious battles for Allah. Eventually, his family becomes too poor to support his education and he is forced to work for his uncle across town. Saleem would walk across town through various bad neighborhoods encountering bullies of the worst sort who would beat him mercilessly and steal from him. One day he runs into a mosque and the imams offer him protection. In fact, they offer him more. The imams make Saleem show him where his bullies live and torment him and they in turn torment his bullies and their familes. As it turns out, the imams he encounters were all members of the Muslim Brotherhood. And from there, it goes. The imams speak with his family, and Saleem begins attending their mosque on a regular basis, becoming radicalized. Soon enough, he is running weapons into Israel for the Palestinian Liberation Organization.And on it goes.What's striking is that the reasons for Saleem's radicalization is actually very mundane. The surrounding Islamic culture inculcates a steady diet of anti-semitism and anti-Americanism, but the boy is too naive to really let it sink in. He defies his parents and plays games with neighborhood Christian children (even though he thinks they're all going to hell). In the beginning, and even sometime after, he's a simple child who sees the world in childlike ways, seeking childlike things. He seeks simple affection and recognition, all things taken advantage of by the Muslim Brotherhood and Fatah. This here is the chief issue that needs to be understood when dealing with these groups that so many are willing to turn a blind eye towards and that so few have dared to speak up about. That Islamist terrorists truly do hate more than they love their children.read more
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The only thing that troubled me about this book--I just don't see how a 50-year-old man can write with such vivid recall about events that happened when he was 7 years old and younger. So sometimes it comes across as quite embellished, and I found myself wondering if perhaps it was even partly fabricated. Nonetheless, it's a fascinating story of what God can do and that no one is truly beyond His reach. And I'm inclined to think that Saleem is right about the sinister intents of radical (and even those not so radical) Muslims. His warning about America's apathy in the face of grave danger is surely on target.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Blood of the Lambs by Kamal Saleem is a perplexing read. The description of a terrorist’s lifestyle: calculated murder, extortion, bloody urban warfare and bigoted hatred was shocking but expected. However, the authenticity of the story didn't ring true with me. Mr. Saleem describes his humble, ultra-conservative Islamic upbringing as a neglected, exploited child among many siblings. His vulnerability led to his recruitment at the age of seven into the Muslim Brotherhood. As his terrorist life-style develops he is propelled into a quagmire of criminal behavior. Eventually he has a life-changing experience which causes him to reconsider his beliefs. I took extra time after finishing this book to absorb the stories Mr. Saleem presented but I had more questions than answers. How did Mr. Saleem, an uneducated child from such an unsophisticated background, develop the manners necessary to mix with the jet-set, and brush shoulders with wealthy sheikhs? How did he acquire the refinement to marry well? Where were the educational credentials that enabled his skilled careers? Red flags appear everywhere.The author contends that the purpose of his book is to warn Americans about the destructive "cancer" which is destroying the country from within while we passively and naïvely encourage cultural diversity. While I question the truthfulness and motives of this book, I do accept the premise that we must be alert citizens while living in a dangerous world.I received this book through the Library Thing Early Reviewer program. The Blood of the Lambs by Kamal Saleem kept my attention to the end but I wouldn’t recommend this book to serious readers.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Born in Beirut, Lebanon, Kamal Saleem details his life growing up, the incidents leading him to terrorism, his life as a terrorist, and eventually his retirement.What I have found most interesting about Saleem's story is what led him to terrorism. Nothing so grandiose, nothing that had him shaking his fist at the sky swearing revenge because of some despicable acts. It was much more mundane. Saleem, in short, fell into it. He grew up in a poor, devout Muslim family. As part of his upbringing he would be taught stories and lessons from the Koran every week and a gerat many of these stories involved warriors slaying Allah's enemies in battle, usually Jews and Christians (bigoted teachings aside, he did have Christian friends, it being Beirut in the 60s). Naturally, Saleem being a young boy, would day dream endlessly about being a warrior and fighting glorious battles for Allah. Eventually, his family becomes too poor to support his education and he is forced to work for his uncle across town. Saleem would walk across town through various bad neighborhoods encountering bullies of the worst sort who would beat him mercilessly and steal from him. One day he runs into a mosque and the imams offer him protection. In fact, they offer him more. The imams make Saleem show him where his bullies live and torment him and they in turn torment his bullies and their familes. As it turns out, the imams he encounters were all members of the Muslim Brotherhood. And from there, it goes. The imams speak with his family, and Saleem begins attending their mosque on a regular basis, becoming radicalized. Soon enough, he is running weapons into Israel for the Palestinian Liberation Organization.And on it goes.What's striking is that the reasons for Saleem's radicalization is actually very mundane. The surrounding Islamic culture inculcates a steady diet of anti-semitism and anti-Americanism, but the boy is too naive to really let it sink in. He defies his parents and plays games with neighborhood Christian children (even though he thinks they're all going to hell). In the beginning, and even sometime after, he's a simple child who sees the world in childlike ways, seeking childlike things. He seeks simple affection and recognition, all things taken advantage of by the Muslim Brotherhood and Fatah. This here is the chief issue that needs to be understood when dealing with these groups that so many are willing to turn a blind eye towards and that so few have dared to speak up about. That Islamist terrorists truly do hate more than they love their children.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In 1940, U.S. General Douglas MacArthur looked at the South Pacific with an uneasy foreboding. Unable to convince his superiors of the impending danger he lamented, “The history of failure in war can be summed up in two worlds: Too Late. Too late in comprehending the deadly purpose of a potential enemy: too late in recognizing the mortal danger; too late in preparedness; too late in uniting all possible forces for resistance; too late in standing with one’s friends. Eventually and tragically, Pearl Harbor proved him right.MacArthur’s quote opens former President Richard M. Nixon’s 1980 book, The Real War: where Nixon warned of the Soviet Union’s plans to expand communism throughout the world. In Nixon’s opinion, the Soviet Union was bent on world domination and were making huge investments in expanding its military to achieve their goal. However, he also warned the democratic west could actually lose the war without military action.Nixon argued America’s involvement in the Vietnam War was more than the United States getting involved in an internal conflict of a sovereign state and it was more than an opportunity for the United States and the Soviet Union to test their respective military metal without subjecting their citizenry to the horrors of war too directly. It was about the spreading of ideological and political influence, because, in Nixon's opinion, if one government could influence (spelled control) another government’s political ideology it could, in effect, control the country. Kamal Saleem’s new book, The Blood of Lambs, 2009, Howard Books, warns us of the danger we face today. A danger that takes two forms; one an indirect, yet overt and violent form - terrorist attacks; and a subtle, but more insidious form of warfare, where the extremist uses our freedoms; our tolerance of other cultures; our schools; our media and our laws to spread their philosophy of intolerance and hate throughout our country. The author, writing under the pseudonym, Kamal Saleem, chronicles his journey from fundamentalist terrorist to caring, dedicated activist; a journey that spans 20 years and takes him through Lebanon, Israel, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Paris and eventually, into America. Blood of Lambs is similar in tone and urgency to Brigitte Gabriel’s 2005 book, Because They Hate (St Martin’s Press), both books cover the same time period and events, particularly the civil war that devastated Lebanon; but from different perspectives, Saleem as a participant and Gabriel as an innocent child trapped in a warzone, struggling to stay alive, while trying to care for her two aging parents. Gabriel’s book is angrier and occasionally drips venom, which is quite understandable when you consider what she was forced to endure. Both describe how Islamic fundamentalism destroyed their beloved country and effectively robbed them of their childhood. But, more important, both make a strong argument for taking our heads out of the clouds and recognizing the very real danger before us as well as the potential consequences of underestimating the situation or the determination of the Islamic fundamentalist to destroy our way of life.The book focuses on the present with Saleem's speaking engagements and the dangers he and his fellow speakers face daily, but makes liberal use of flashbacks to describe his childhood, how he fell under the influence of the Muslim brotherhood and became obsessed with the Jihad mission. He chronicles how cracks eventually developed in his ideology, how and why he broke with them; courageously began speaking out against them, in the process, becoming an enemy to their cause and a marked man. The seeds of intolerance and hate were planted while the author was still a child. Saleem would sit around the kitchen table while his mother cooked and told grand stories of adventure and honor. His beloved mother taught him that even the most evil of Muslim men could redeem themselves and regain their honor by killing Jews and infidels. Saleem would daydream about cutting off the head of a Jew and relished in the imaginary glory the feat would bring. Suddenly, things changed at home; as the family grew his parents no longer had time for him and he began to feel invisible. It was about this time that he fell under the protection of the Fadayeen. As he succumbed to the Fadayeen influence, he began to feel a sense of importance and belonging denied him at home. He tells how as child, his young mind proved fertile ground for the extremists who wanted to fill his head with hate and the belief that dying while killing innocent people was a worthy, even righteous cause. He recalls how the Fadayeen preyed on young children; playing on their egos, misguided sense of adventure, naivety and ultimately, their expendability to further their cause. This misguided sense of adventure caused one of Saleem’s young friends his life. He was shot while attempting to smuggle weapons into Israel.Over the next decade he continued to live the life of a terrorist, until an unexpected event changed his outlook, life and mission; to warn the American people about the impending danger to which most are largely unaware. Saleem points out the holy war is much more than an armed struggle for supremacy punctuated with scattered acts of extreme violence; but a systematic plan to terrorize, disrupt, undermine and eventually destroy the western powers. The battle lines are drawn much closer to home than we think. Saleem contends the battle line is not right at our front door, but behind us; and we missed it. The battle is being fought from the belly of our society, where people are locked up in poverty, prison or inner-city turmoil to the very pinnacle of power and influence in our corporations, foundations and universities. This book hits upon two of the hottest and most debated topics of our time; religion and politics; consequently, predictably and inevitable this book will prove controversial. Controversial not only because of its content; but because of the subjectiveness, beliefs, culture and prejudices of the reader. Such books hit home because they call into question and confront our core beliefs and values, those beliefs and values that define who we are; or at least, define who we think we are. Undoubtedly, there will be those who believe his adventure stories border on the incredulous; but giving him the benefit of the doubt we have to ask ourselves; is it that these accounts are simply wild and reckless stories weaved by an amoral opportunist to play on our fears and make a buck in the process; or can it be that in our arrogance and ignorance we just cannot make ourselves believe that there are people in this world who can actually think in such a cold, callous and deadly way?Many Muslims will see the book as yet another attack on their religion and culture; but is that the full story or can it be that they are oblivious or simply do not want to acknowledge or admit that there are ruthlessly cruel people who use their beloved faith to justify mass murder, oppression, intolerance and a zealous ambition to rule the world? Saleem's story is engrossing and his message, unnerving, but it lacks the potency and urgency of Gabriel's book. This probably has more to do with the fact the book is written from the point of view of a former terrorist than any inherent weakness in the book itself. Readers tend to side with, and believe those with whom they can empathize. And it is easier to empathize with a victim than with an aggressor. Some points may seem a bit over the top, but after all what autobiography does not contain at least a little poetic license? Does that mean that we should not consider the possibility that the underlying message is valid? Does that mean we should ignore the impending danger simply because we did not like that way in which that danger was packaged? Should we put our lives, our children, our freedom and our country only in the hands of a good story teller? If so, does the name Dr. Joseph Goebbels ring a bell?While Saleem does not offer many hard solutions to the problem; other than "wake up", he gives us a vivid account of the things we should be looking out for and how the war will be fought. And if anyone has been keeping up with the news lately, the names Major Nidal Malik Hasan and Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab should be familiar, disturbingly so. This book, almost certainly, will not give you the answers you seek to the problems of the world and will probably result in more questions than answers, but a questioning attitude in these perilous times is a good start - and hopefully, we will some day look back on these uneasy times without having to lament, it's too late.
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Kamal Saleem’s career as a radical Muslim terrorist began at his mother’s knee. Her daily Islamic family devotions ingrained in her young son the precepts that he would build his early life upon – killing for the glory of Allah. His first missions as a seven-year-old saw him smuggling weapons and watching his fellow playmates mowed down by automatic weapons. Clearly, most readers of his memoirs will have much different childhood memories than his.Saleem (a pseudonym due to serious death threads from jihadists) shares his rather graphic memoirs in the hopes of wakening those living in our accepting (and often naïve) culture with the realities of the dangers radical Islam poses. Grippingly written with the help of Lynn Vincent, it is hard to pull away from the story he shares, and it is one that will linger with me for a great while.More striking than even his detailed admissions of violence and conspiracy committed in the name of Islam is his meeting with the true and living God; the only force capable of turning him from the path of destruction he had lived on for so many years.The Blood of Lambs is easy to read and incredibly engrossing. I have always had a difficult time getting a handle on the situation in the Middle East, but reading of major events and skirmishes through Saleem’s eyes helps me to see things in a personal, and therefore memorable way.Perhaps more importantly, it calls us to be aware of the tactics Islamists use to deceive, convert, and recruit terrorists even within the bounds of their target countries. Believers are called to be as wise as serpents however, so being aware of the tactics at work helps us know how to watch for, counter, and most importantly pray for those who would see our violent destruction. . It would be easy to slip into a spirit of paranoid fear after reading Salam’s memoir, so it is important to remember that God is sovereign and holds us in His hands.Any reader with even a passing interest in the ongoing war on terror, Christian/Muslim relations, radical Islam, or terrorism but without an extensive background in these topics will be well served by Saleem’s first-hand account and insiders point of view.Reviewed at quiverfullfamily.com
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This is a very disturbing book to read. Kamal Saleem paints a side of Islam that we didn't cover in our World Culture's class and its hard to know what to do with this information.As a book it is powerful, full of experiences so shocking that I found them hard to digest. This is a side of the war on terrorism that I have never heard told before. Kamal's childhood was brutal and the reader finds themself wishing someone would show this child love and decency, saving him from the vacuum of hate. At times Blood of Lambs is exciting, at others terrifying, and eventually redemptive. I recommend it.
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