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Things break all the time.
Day breaks, waves break, voices break.
Promises break.
Hearts break.


Every expectant parent will tell you that they don't want a perfect baby, just a healthy one. Charlotte and Sean O'Keefe would have asked for a healthy baby, too, if they'd been given the choice. Instead, their lives are made up of sleepless nights, mounting bills, the pitying stares of "luckier" parents, and maybe worst of all, the what-ifs. What if their child had been born healthy? But it's all worth it because Willow is, well, funny as it seems, perfect. She's smart as a whip, on her way to being as pretty as her mother, kind, brave, and for a five-year-old an unexpectedly deep source of wisdom. Willow is Willow, in sickness and in health.

Everything changes, though, after a series of events forces Charlotte and her husband to confront the most serious what-ifs of all. What if Charlotte should have known earlier of Willow's illness? What if things could have been different? What if their beloved Willow had never been born? To do Willow justice, Charlotte must ask herself these questions and one more. What constitutes a valuable life?

Emotionally riveting and profoundly moving, Handle with Care brings us into the heart of a family bound by an incredible burden, a desperate will to keep their ties from breaking, and, ultimately, a powerful capacity for love. Written with the grace and wisdom she's become famous for, beloved #1 New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult offers us an unforgettable novel about the fragility of life and the lengths we will go to protect it.

Topics: Heartbreaking, Family, Eating Disorders, Adoption, Friendship, Disease, and Daughters

Published: Atria Books on Mar 3, 2009
ISBN: 9781439156308
List price: $7.99
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Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A thoroughly enjoyable book, that i did not want to end.
Then it ended, and with it went my enjoyment.
I dislike greatly when endings are so abrupt and so
shocking. It ends the book, but my frustration goes on
for a long long time.
I feel as if the author got tired and could not come up with
a proper thought out ending, so she decided to do something
totally out of character with the rest of the story and leave
us all upset and wishing for a proper end.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
great book!!read more
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What responsibility does a health care provider have when a child is born with a severe disability? That is the question Jodi Picoult asks in her latest book. Sean and Charlotte O'Keefe have it all: jobs they love, cute daughter, happy home, and the pregnancy they've waited for months for. But their perfect lives come to an abrupt end when the fetus Charlotte is pregnant with is diagnosed with OI ("brittle bone" disease). Raising Willow turns out to be very challenging, what with the medical emergencies, high doctor bills, and the unknown prognosis for her future. When Charlotte and Sean are given the option of a lawsuit for wrongful death, they think this may be the way to give Willow financial stability for the future. But this stability comes at a big cost: one that will have major repercutions for their entire family as well as their close friends. Handle With Care is pretty much typical Picoult fare. Compelling plot that isn't always believable, characters which of course include a lawyer with problems of her own, big court scenes, and the twist at the end. Despite the predictability of the basic story line, I really enjoyed this book. There's something about her books that just pull you in (or pull me in, anyway), and her endings are always such a surprise. This book was no exception.read more
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When their daughter, Willow, is born with osteogenesis imperfecta, Charlotte and her husband watch their perfect life fall apart. As medical bills mount and Willow's pain becomes to much to bear, Charlotte has no choice but to sue her doctor her, one-time best friend. While her husband is uncooperative, Charlotte must set aside personal feelings for the well-being of her daughter and financial security of her family. Kind of an interesting story - but I didn't like any of the characters and it was very long.read more
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I enjoyed this book, though I think I would have enjoyed it even better if I had not read it just after I was finished with reading another Jodi Picoult book (Harvesting the Heart). I read various types of books and usually try to mix them up a bit so I don't feel like I'm reading the same book over and over again. In fact, the line about the female attorney deciding on her profession after she told her mom that the things that she liked to do were read and argue was the same in both books. (And it wasn't the same character.) I could see both sides of the argument in this book, so I bounced back and forth about how I wanted it to end. I really liked Willow and thought she was a remarkably smart girl. I did not like what happened at the end of the book, but can't say anything else without spoiling it for others.read more
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Excellent in every way!read more
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Hmmm..I love Jodi Picoult. This one though...was an okay book. Sure, it was readable, a quick read and had all of the Picoult 'formulations'. But...I dunno. Not her best, but now bad either. Not sure that the Picoult 'twist' at the end of this story was essential? It was gut wrenching like some of the other endings, but I still give her props for turning out interesting storylines.read more
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Willow O’Keefe is born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Type III - otherwise known as brittle bone disease. Willow’s bones can break by just sneezing or turning over in bed while sleeping. She will suffer hundreds of broken bones throughout her life span. After a horrible experience in Disney World, the family consults an attorney and they are introduced to the term "Wrongful Birth". The attorney’s and Charlotte (Willow's mother) believe that Willow’s condition was not diagnosed in time for Charlotte to have the option of whether or not to terminate the pregnancy. Therefore a malpractice lawsuit is filed against her OB/GYN and BFF, Piper.This lawsuit is the main focus and the one that sets the wheels in motion throughout the story. It is also what makes and breaks these people; including two marriages, friendships, and two innocent girls. Charlotte O'Keefe has to convince a jury that although she loves her daughter unconditionally, the cost and ability to properly raise her is just something that her family cannot afford and therefore must come from someone else, all by standing up in front of a jury and admitting that if she had prior knowledge to her daughter's condition, she would have terminated the pregnancy.Written in the same style of "My Sister's Keeper", this story is told from different perspectives (Charlotte; Sean - Willow’s dad; Amelia - Willow’s older sister; Piper - Charlotte’s OB/GYN and best friend; and Marin - Charlotte’s attorney) - yet, all the chapters are written as letters to Willow. To avoid confusion, all characters have their own chapters and their own font-type so that you are aware of who you are living through at the moment. I’ve read several reviews that say that this story is a remake of "My Sister’s Keeper" and, although there are some similarities, I found the storyline to be very engrossing and something that I honestly could not put down.I also read some reviews that say that the story was too much like Picoult’s other books and therefore predictable, but I did not find this to be true. I learned so much about OI and, of course, plan on googling to learn more about it. I laughed and I cried and was at war with myself on who was right or who was wrong. I will say that I cried just about every other page for the first couple of chapters, then totally lost it at the end, but what a ride through moral/ethical issues. I hope you enjoy it through your tears, I know I did.read more
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I keep asking myself why do I read Picoults books? They always seem so sad. But yet, I continue to pick them up and read them. I know why, they are wonderful. This one is no exception. It is sad, sweet, loving, bitter sweet. As usual, you feel all of the emotions as you dive deep in the pages. I highly recommend this book.read more
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Picoult does some things well. She crafts stories that contains situations that are very thought-provoking. With Handle with Care, though, she has managed to present a story that is thought-provoking, yet not very well thought out at all.To emphasize the point of removing Willow's mother's choice to terminate her pregnancy before Willow's birth, Picoult should not have, in fact, presented that very choice to Charlotte. It removed Charlotte's ownership of her indignation, and frankly, her sympathy. She WAS given the choice to terminate and in fact, did not take it. Which is admirable, really, though Picoult did a relatively poor job of showing Charlotte's difficulties in tending to a daughter with such a severe illness. Charlotte did have career skills that she could craft from her home, so instead of giving up her job, she could have, and eventually did, earn money while still being at home to tend to her daughter.The overwhelming medical expenses of Willow's therapy is a valid plot point, and one heavy on many minds in the current political climate. The myth that Picoult perpetuates here, though, is the idea that a lawsuit does not hurt the physician, as she had malpractice insurance. This is patently false, especially for a non-case as Charlotte's. The skyrocketing cost of malpractice insurance, especially in a field as sensitive as obstetrics, is one wheel in the cog of huge medical expenses. That does not even include the mental and emotional toil on a physician who is being sued, which Picoult relates poorly here.The greatest disappointment here is the attitude that Charlotte takes that Willow will completely understand that her mother did indeed want her, even when she testifies that she would have aborted her, given the chance. Willow did not know that she had the chance and did not take it. I'm not kid-centric by any means (ask my kids) but that seems like a lot to pile onto a six year old, especially a sick one.And then you have the sister, conveniently entering "bad teenager" mode - blue hair, bulemia, and cutting - not necessarily in that order, and almost simultaneously. It's like Picoult put all "horrible things that parents face" situations into a hat, shook it up, and pulled out three or four, and went from there. So disappointing.SPOILER ALERT:And then in the end, they win the money, but apparently don't need it, as they never cash the check. And then the kid dies in the end. Ugh. I don't even know why I finished this. I generally don't rate books one-star, as I'll set down a one-star book rather than finish it. But this one...ugh.read more
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It's been a long time since I've read such a thoroughly horrible book. I'd give this zero stars if I could. It was pure dreck, through and through, and I seriously resent the time I spent with it. Every single character is unremittingly miserable and unpleasant--there is not a single character who inspires any spark of affection. The motivations for their constant destructive actions are so cliched as to be actually inexplicable, and as if that weren't enough the absurd ending leeches any possible meaning from it all. Really I think the only explanation is that Picoult is a raging nihilist masquerading as a thoughtful Issues writer. I know this was written for book groups--my bookstore job suggests that that's her primary readership--but she notches everything up to such a level of misery and indecision that nothing means anything. Except I don't think the nihilism is at all intentional so--what IS the point? There is none, I think, and that is a serious flaw in an Issues novel--it has to have a point because nothing in the plot, characters, or quality of the writing make it worth reading otherwise.read more
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A couple have a flawed baby-whose fault is it? I read the first chapter and the last several. Not so good.read more
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I really liked this book, because of the story line and the way Picoult gives you the perspectives of all the characters in the story. Also, it keeps you intersted because of all the twists in the plot.read more
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I was looking forward to this book and enjoyed it, but found the ending to be much too similar to My Sister's Keeper. Willow is a 5 year old girl who was born with brittle bone disease and has broken many bones in her short lifetime. After a vacation mishap, her parents decide to sue the OB/GYN in a wrongful birth lawsuit.read more
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Warning: may contain spoilers.An absolute Jodi Picoult classic; a family struggles with unlikely-but-not-completely-implausible catastrophe, and experiences conflict, then turmoil, and finally a resolution to it all. And (to paraphrase) then Picoult goes and spoils it all by doing something stupid like... the ending. I thought this book was mostly excellent, until the last five pages. The characters were intriguing, irritating and engaging in equal measure, the plotline was gritty, and I couldn’t put it down, but the ending was just painful. I had the same reaction to My Sister’s Keeper. I genuinely threw the book on the floor in disgust, because I lost a bet I’d made with myself ten pages earlier that she really wouldn’t do it again, but she really did. Oh Jodi... what were you thinking?Worth a read, but only in paperback; the hardback would hurt if it landed on your foot in the course of aforementioned-throwing-on-floor-in-disgust-at-dire-ending.read more
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Admittedly, the book was getting a bit lengthy so I skipped to the end. Still I followed through and read the rest. The twist at the end was just pure irony. Meanwhile, it gets you thinking what you would do and who do you agree with. Excellent characters; I simply fell in love with Willow.read more
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If I'd never read My Sister's Keeper, I would probably think this was a great book. The characters are interesting and well-formed, the topic is fascinating, the issues are real, but the novel has practically the same structure as MSK, right down to the cop-out ending. Very disappointing.read more
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I found this book interesting. I had never heard of osteogenesis imperfecta before reading this and since then have met someone who has it. When I finished reading I threw the book on the floor and kicked it across the room. Not a good endingread more
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Jodi Picoult is one of my favorite authors (I loved The Pact)...however, I felt this book was a remake of My Sister's Keeper. I just knew how it would end long before I finished the book. The family dynamics was fascinating.read more
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An easy read which I had finished in two days.The mother was a difficult person to empathise with. Normally a Picoult novel will have me questioning my ethics and reactions to moral dilemnas. Unfortunately despite wanting to sympathise with the mother I found myself detesting her and the manner in which she tried to defend her actions, and their ultimate repercussions. The ending was so out of left field and even now two days later I am not sure why Ms Picoult chose to end the book this way and what she was trying to tell us.read more
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Willow is a five-year-old girl who suffers from OI, the disease where a person's bones can break just by sitting down. Charlotte and Sean are the parents of Willow and are at odds about whether or not to sue their obstretician, who is also Charlotte's best friend, under the wrongful birth theory. Picoult had a good starting point, but with cliched characters and with a writing style of "why use 5 words when you can use 50," things went downhill fast. Disappointing read.read more
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I hate that I have to give this book 3 starts. I am angry about the ending. I wont reveal anything, but I just have to say that Piccoul's books are getting predictable and formulaic. I used to love her books and have even seen her speak in person and she is a phenomenal speaker. But this book made me angry and not in a good controversial way, in a why did I wast my time way. The story overall was a good story and was interesting, but the ending took any enjoyment I may have had reading it and erased it. I would NOT recommend reading this book. If you've read her other books, you've read this one.read more
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Fractures occur in relationships as well as in Willow O'Keefe. This is a great read, although not 'light reading', by any means. As with all Jodi Picoult's books, it is superbly written.The ending surprised me, though. I'm not sure how I feel about it, yet!read more
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Wow - since I read my first Jodi Picoult about three years ago I knew to expect a thought-provoking book. One thing I love about Ms. Picoult's novels is the fact that she brings interesting and controversial topics to light but doesn't tell you how to feel one way or the other about it, which is unusual in today's world. We all have our opinions and believe they are right. No doubt Ms. Picoult has her opinions too, but she chooses to bring all sides of a topic to light. Handle with Care is another great example of this. Making the wrongful birth lawsuit front and center and how it really makes different people feel. From the one who is being told that she shouldn't have been born (but that is a lie mommy is telling), to the sibling who is unintentionallly left behind in the dust of the lawsuit, to the marriage that takes second place at this point and to others it affects such as the doctor and best friend and the whole community of disabled people who essentially are told that their lives are not perfect and therefore not worth living. I think I have had the same thoughts as each of the characters and it really pointed out some things to me that I feel that are wrong in my own beliefs. It's definitely opened my eyes to several different things.While the issue is a part of this book, but definitely not the whole. I felt like I truly got to know all the characters. I listened to this on audio and it was wonderful. They used different people for the different characters in the book who were writing to Willow at the time. The distinguing voices were a big help with listening. It was a true joy to listen to. The story never lagged for me, in fact I would find myself listening in the car a few extra minutes, carrying my mp3 player with me to listen when I could. The story moves forward at a good pace, the characters seem real and the story is just riveting.This book is wonderful and heartbreaking and so much more. It is well worth the time it takes to read it (it's a large book) and I highly recommend it!read more
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With her latest, Jodi Picoult has definitely landed in the "I don't want to read these anymore, but feel I must because library patrons ask about them all the time" category (see Nicholas Sparks, James Patterson). How does she cook this stuff up? Aren't there any marginally normal kids available to write about anymore?read more
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A very typical Jodi Picoult book. I couldn't sympathise with any of the lead characters, it was far too similar to "My Sister's Keeper", and I saw the end coming a mile-off. I feel like Picoult has exhausted the genre. Her books are becoming more and more derivative, and I feel she may have run out of steam. Her books are like ice-cream; a guilty pleasure, easy to digest but after too much you get sick of it.read more
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Once again Jodi Picoult tackles a difficult subject and makes you feel for all the characters involved. But I found this book a little disappointing. The author did an awesome job building the characters and i like the way she used each person's voice to carry the story. I missed hearing from Willow, the little girl with OI. I would have liked to have heard from her. i was also disappointed in the ending. Having read my Sister's Keeper, I felt this story followed a formula. I hope this does not continue in her future novels.read more
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Jodi Picoult may have the recipe for a bestseller in her kitchen, but not all of her novels are created equal. I definitely have my favorites, and then there are those that seem to be churned out in response to an impending deadline. That being said, Handle with Care did not disappoint. While there were some similarities to My Sister's Keeper in the structure of her characters, it is her thoughts - Jodi's thoughts - that seem to seep through the story at unexpected times that set certain books apart from the mediocre ones.Formula or no formula...I loved this book.read more
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U
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A thoroughly enjoyable book, that i did not want to end.
Then it ended, and with it went my enjoyment.
I dislike greatly when endings are so abrupt and so
shocking. It ends the book, but my frustration goes on
for a long long time.
I feel as if the author got tired and could not come up with
a proper thought out ending, so she decided to do something
totally out of character with the rest of the story and leave
us all upset and wishing for a proper end.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
great book!!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
What responsibility does a health care provider have when a child is born with a severe disability? That is the question Jodi Picoult asks in her latest book. Sean and Charlotte O'Keefe have it all: jobs they love, cute daughter, happy home, and the pregnancy they've waited for months for. But their perfect lives come to an abrupt end when the fetus Charlotte is pregnant with is diagnosed with OI ("brittle bone" disease). Raising Willow turns out to be very challenging, what with the medical emergencies, high doctor bills, and the unknown prognosis for her future. When Charlotte and Sean are given the option of a lawsuit for wrongful death, they think this may be the way to give Willow financial stability for the future. But this stability comes at a big cost: one that will have major repercutions for their entire family as well as their close friends. Handle With Care is pretty much typical Picoult fare. Compelling plot that isn't always believable, characters which of course include a lawyer with problems of her own, big court scenes, and the twist at the end. Despite the predictability of the basic story line, I really enjoyed this book. There's something about her books that just pull you in (or pull me in, anyway), and her endings are always such a surprise. This book was no exception.
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When their daughter, Willow, is born with osteogenesis imperfecta, Charlotte and her husband watch their perfect life fall apart. As medical bills mount and Willow's pain becomes to much to bear, Charlotte has no choice but to sue her doctor her, one-time best friend. While her husband is uncooperative, Charlotte must set aside personal feelings for the well-being of her daughter and financial security of her family. Kind of an interesting story - but I didn't like any of the characters and it was very long.
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I enjoyed this book, though I think I would have enjoyed it even better if I had not read it just after I was finished with reading another Jodi Picoult book (Harvesting the Heart). I read various types of books and usually try to mix them up a bit so I don't feel like I'm reading the same book over and over again. In fact, the line about the female attorney deciding on her profession after she told her mom that the things that she liked to do were read and argue was the same in both books. (And it wasn't the same character.) I could see both sides of the argument in this book, so I bounced back and forth about how I wanted it to end. I really liked Willow and thought she was a remarkably smart girl. I did not like what happened at the end of the book, but can't say anything else without spoiling it for others.
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Excellent in every way!
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Hmmm..I love Jodi Picoult. This one though...was an okay book. Sure, it was readable, a quick read and had all of the Picoult 'formulations'. But...I dunno. Not her best, but now bad either. Not sure that the Picoult 'twist' at the end of this story was essential? It was gut wrenching like some of the other endings, but I still give her props for turning out interesting storylines.
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Willow O’Keefe is born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Type III - otherwise known as brittle bone disease. Willow’s bones can break by just sneezing or turning over in bed while sleeping. She will suffer hundreds of broken bones throughout her life span. After a horrible experience in Disney World, the family consults an attorney and they are introduced to the term "Wrongful Birth". The attorney’s and Charlotte (Willow's mother) believe that Willow’s condition was not diagnosed in time for Charlotte to have the option of whether or not to terminate the pregnancy. Therefore a malpractice lawsuit is filed against her OB/GYN and BFF, Piper.This lawsuit is the main focus and the one that sets the wheels in motion throughout the story. It is also what makes and breaks these people; including two marriages, friendships, and two innocent girls. Charlotte O'Keefe has to convince a jury that although she loves her daughter unconditionally, the cost and ability to properly raise her is just something that her family cannot afford and therefore must come from someone else, all by standing up in front of a jury and admitting that if she had prior knowledge to her daughter's condition, she would have terminated the pregnancy.Written in the same style of "My Sister's Keeper", this story is told from different perspectives (Charlotte; Sean - Willow’s dad; Amelia - Willow’s older sister; Piper - Charlotte’s OB/GYN and best friend; and Marin - Charlotte’s attorney) - yet, all the chapters are written as letters to Willow. To avoid confusion, all characters have their own chapters and their own font-type so that you are aware of who you are living through at the moment. I’ve read several reviews that say that this story is a remake of "My Sister’s Keeper" and, although there are some similarities, I found the storyline to be very engrossing and something that I honestly could not put down.I also read some reviews that say that the story was too much like Picoult’s other books and therefore predictable, but I did not find this to be true. I learned so much about OI and, of course, plan on googling to learn more about it. I laughed and I cried and was at war with myself on who was right or who was wrong. I will say that I cried just about every other page for the first couple of chapters, then totally lost it at the end, but what a ride through moral/ethical issues. I hope you enjoy it through your tears, I know I did.
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I keep asking myself why do I read Picoults books? They always seem so sad. But yet, I continue to pick them up and read them. I know why, they are wonderful. This one is no exception. It is sad, sweet, loving, bitter sweet. As usual, you feel all of the emotions as you dive deep in the pages. I highly recommend this book.
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Picoult does some things well. She crafts stories that contains situations that are very thought-provoking. With Handle with Care, though, she has managed to present a story that is thought-provoking, yet not very well thought out at all.To emphasize the point of removing Willow's mother's choice to terminate her pregnancy before Willow's birth, Picoult should not have, in fact, presented that very choice to Charlotte. It removed Charlotte's ownership of her indignation, and frankly, her sympathy. She WAS given the choice to terminate and in fact, did not take it. Which is admirable, really, though Picoult did a relatively poor job of showing Charlotte's difficulties in tending to a daughter with such a severe illness. Charlotte did have career skills that she could craft from her home, so instead of giving up her job, she could have, and eventually did, earn money while still being at home to tend to her daughter.The overwhelming medical expenses of Willow's therapy is a valid plot point, and one heavy on many minds in the current political climate. The myth that Picoult perpetuates here, though, is the idea that a lawsuit does not hurt the physician, as she had malpractice insurance. This is patently false, especially for a non-case as Charlotte's. The skyrocketing cost of malpractice insurance, especially in a field as sensitive as obstetrics, is one wheel in the cog of huge medical expenses. That does not even include the mental and emotional toil on a physician who is being sued, which Picoult relates poorly here.The greatest disappointment here is the attitude that Charlotte takes that Willow will completely understand that her mother did indeed want her, even when she testifies that she would have aborted her, given the chance. Willow did not know that she had the chance and did not take it. I'm not kid-centric by any means (ask my kids) but that seems like a lot to pile onto a six year old, especially a sick one.And then you have the sister, conveniently entering "bad teenager" mode - blue hair, bulemia, and cutting - not necessarily in that order, and almost simultaneously. It's like Picoult put all "horrible things that parents face" situations into a hat, shook it up, and pulled out three or four, and went from there. So disappointing.SPOILER ALERT:And then in the end, they win the money, but apparently don't need it, as they never cash the check. And then the kid dies in the end. Ugh. I don't even know why I finished this. I generally don't rate books one-star, as I'll set down a one-star book rather than finish it. But this one...ugh.
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It's been a long time since I've read such a thoroughly horrible book. I'd give this zero stars if I could. It was pure dreck, through and through, and I seriously resent the time I spent with it. Every single character is unremittingly miserable and unpleasant--there is not a single character who inspires any spark of affection. The motivations for their constant destructive actions are so cliched as to be actually inexplicable, and as if that weren't enough the absurd ending leeches any possible meaning from it all. Really I think the only explanation is that Picoult is a raging nihilist masquerading as a thoughtful Issues writer. I know this was written for book groups--my bookstore job suggests that that's her primary readership--but she notches everything up to such a level of misery and indecision that nothing means anything. Except I don't think the nihilism is at all intentional so--what IS the point? There is none, I think, and that is a serious flaw in an Issues novel--it has to have a point because nothing in the plot, characters, or quality of the writing make it worth reading otherwise.
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A couple have a flawed baby-whose fault is it? I read the first chapter and the last several. Not so good.
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I really liked this book, because of the story line and the way Picoult gives you the perspectives of all the characters in the story. Also, it keeps you intersted because of all the twists in the plot.
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I was looking forward to this book and enjoyed it, but found the ending to be much too similar to My Sister's Keeper. Willow is a 5 year old girl who was born with brittle bone disease and has broken many bones in her short lifetime. After a vacation mishap, her parents decide to sue the OB/GYN in a wrongful birth lawsuit.
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Warning: may contain spoilers.An absolute Jodi Picoult classic; a family struggles with unlikely-but-not-completely-implausible catastrophe, and experiences conflict, then turmoil, and finally a resolution to it all. And (to paraphrase) then Picoult goes and spoils it all by doing something stupid like... the ending. I thought this book was mostly excellent, until the last five pages. The characters were intriguing, irritating and engaging in equal measure, the plotline was gritty, and I couldn’t put it down, but the ending was just painful. I had the same reaction to My Sister’s Keeper. I genuinely threw the book on the floor in disgust, because I lost a bet I’d made with myself ten pages earlier that she really wouldn’t do it again, but she really did. Oh Jodi... what were you thinking?Worth a read, but only in paperback; the hardback would hurt if it landed on your foot in the course of aforementioned-throwing-on-floor-in-disgust-at-dire-ending.
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Admittedly, the book was getting a bit lengthy so I skipped to the end. Still I followed through and read the rest. The twist at the end was just pure irony. Meanwhile, it gets you thinking what you would do and who do you agree with. Excellent characters; I simply fell in love with Willow.
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If I'd never read My Sister's Keeper, I would probably think this was a great book. The characters are interesting and well-formed, the topic is fascinating, the issues are real, but the novel has practically the same structure as MSK, right down to the cop-out ending. Very disappointing.
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I found this book interesting. I had never heard of osteogenesis imperfecta before reading this and since then have met someone who has it. When I finished reading I threw the book on the floor and kicked it across the room. Not a good ending
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Jodi Picoult is one of my favorite authors (I loved The Pact)...however, I felt this book was a remake of My Sister's Keeper. I just knew how it would end long before I finished the book. The family dynamics was fascinating.
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An easy read which I had finished in two days.The mother was a difficult person to empathise with. Normally a Picoult novel will have me questioning my ethics and reactions to moral dilemnas. Unfortunately despite wanting to sympathise with the mother I found myself detesting her and the manner in which she tried to defend her actions, and their ultimate repercussions. The ending was so out of left field and even now two days later I am not sure why Ms Picoult chose to end the book this way and what she was trying to tell us.
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Willow is a five-year-old girl who suffers from OI, the disease where a person's bones can break just by sitting down. Charlotte and Sean are the parents of Willow and are at odds about whether or not to sue their obstretician, who is also Charlotte's best friend, under the wrongful birth theory. Picoult had a good starting point, but with cliched characters and with a writing style of "why use 5 words when you can use 50," things went downhill fast. Disappointing read.
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I hate that I have to give this book 3 starts. I am angry about the ending. I wont reveal anything, but I just have to say that Piccoul's books are getting predictable and formulaic. I used to love her books and have even seen her speak in person and she is a phenomenal speaker. But this book made me angry and not in a good controversial way, in a why did I wast my time way. The story overall was a good story and was interesting, but the ending took any enjoyment I may have had reading it and erased it. I would NOT recommend reading this book. If you've read her other books, you've read this one.
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Fractures occur in relationships as well as in Willow O'Keefe. This is a great read, although not 'light reading', by any means. As with all Jodi Picoult's books, it is superbly written.The ending surprised me, though. I'm not sure how I feel about it, yet!
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Wow - since I read my first Jodi Picoult about three years ago I knew to expect a thought-provoking book. One thing I love about Ms. Picoult's novels is the fact that she brings interesting and controversial topics to light but doesn't tell you how to feel one way or the other about it, which is unusual in today's world. We all have our opinions and believe they are right. No doubt Ms. Picoult has her opinions too, but she chooses to bring all sides of a topic to light. Handle with Care is another great example of this. Making the wrongful birth lawsuit front and center and how it really makes different people feel. From the one who is being told that she shouldn't have been born (but that is a lie mommy is telling), to the sibling who is unintentionallly left behind in the dust of the lawsuit, to the marriage that takes second place at this point and to others it affects such as the doctor and best friend and the whole community of disabled people who essentially are told that their lives are not perfect and therefore not worth living. I think I have had the same thoughts as each of the characters and it really pointed out some things to me that I feel that are wrong in my own beliefs. It's definitely opened my eyes to several different things.While the issue is a part of this book, but definitely not the whole. I felt like I truly got to know all the characters. I listened to this on audio and it was wonderful. They used different people for the different characters in the book who were writing to Willow at the time. The distinguing voices were a big help with listening. It was a true joy to listen to. The story never lagged for me, in fact I would find myself listening in the car a few extra minutes, carrying my mp3 player with me to listen when I could. The story moves forward at a good pace, the characters seem real and the story is just riveting.This book is wonderful and heartbreaking and so much more. It is well worth the time it takes to read it (it's a large book) and I highly recommend it!
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With her latest, Jodi Picoult has definitely landed in the "I don't want to read these anymore, but feel I must because library patrons ask about them all the time" category (see Nicholas Sparks, James Patterson). How does she cook this stuff up? Aren't there any marginally normal kids available to write about anymore?
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A very typical Jodi Picoult book. I couldn't sympathise with any of the lead characters, it was far too similar to "My Sister's Keeper", and I saw the end coming a mile-off. I feel like Picoult has exhausted the genre. Her books are becoming more and more derivative, and I feel she may have run out of steam. Her books are like ice-cream; a guilty pleasure, easy to digest but after too much you get sick of it.
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Once again Jodi Picoult tackles a difficult subject and makes you feel for all the characters involved. But I found this book a little disappointing. The author did an awesome job building the characters and i like the way she used each person's voice to carry the story. I missed hearing from Willow, the little girl with OI. I would have liked to have heard from her. i was also disappointed in the ending. Having read my Sister's Keeper, I felt this story followed a formula. I hope this does not continue in her future novels.
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Jodi Picoult may have the recipe for a bestseller in her kitchen, but not all of her novels are created equal. I definitely have my favorites, and then there are those that seem to be churned out in response to an impending deadline. That being said, Handle with Care did not disappoint. While there were some similarities to My Sister's Keeper in the structure of her characters, it is her thoughts - Jodi's thoughts - that seem to seep through the story at unexpected times that set certain books apart from the mediocre ones.Formula or no formula...I loved this book.
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