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Things break all the time.
Day breaks, waves break, voices break.
Promises break.
Hearts break.


Every expectant parent will tell you that they don't want a perfect baby, just a healthy one. Charlotte and Sean O'Keefe would have asked for a healthy baby, too, if they'd been given the choice. Instead, their lives are made up of sleepless nights, mounting bills, the pitying stares of "luckier" parents, and maybe worst of all, the what-ifs. What if their child had been born healthy? But it's all worth it because Willow is, well, funny as it seems, perfect. She's smart as a whip, on her way to being as pretty as her mother, kind, brave, and for a five-year-old an unexpectedly deep source of wisdom. Willow is Willow, in sickness and in health.

Everything changes, though, after a series of events forces Charlotte and her husband to confront the most serious what-ifs of all. What if Charlotte should have known earlier of Willow's illness? What if things could have been different? What if their beloved Willow had never been born? To do Willow justice, Charlotte must ask herself these questions and one more. What constitutes a valuable life?

Emotionally riveting and profoundly moving, Handle with Care brings us into the heart of a family bound by an incredible burden, a desperate will to keep their ties from breaking, and, ultimately, a powerful capacity for love. Written with the grace and wisdom she's become famous for, beloved #1 New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult offers us an unforgettable novel about the fragility of life and the lengths we will go to protect it.

Topics: Heartbreaking, Family, Eating Disorders, Adoption, Friendship, Disease, and Daughters

Published: Atria Books on
ISBN: 9781439156308
List price: $11.99
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Overall not bad but not great. Typical story line for Jodi and the ending I found was just pointless and had no meaning. more
A thoroughly enjoyable book, that i did not want to end.
Then it ended, and with it went my enjoyment.
I dislike greatly when endings are so abrupt and so
shocking. It ends the book, but my frustration goes on
for a long long time.
I feel as if the author got tired and could not come up with
a proper thought out ending, so she decided to do something
totally out of character with the rest of the story and leave
us all upset and wishing for a proper end.more
great book!!more
Wow. what a book. I could not stop reading last night and normally when i wake up the first thing i do is go on the computer but this time I had to to finish it and I just did. Wow. that is the word that comes to mind.

Thought provoking to say the least. This is a book that will keep you thinking cause even though the people in the book have totally different opinions Jodi Picoult makes it so that you can feel sympathy for most of the people in the book. (Exception : Lawyer of Piper)

Finished this book maybe but not really cause I keep on thinking about it. How is Amelia now. What's wrong with Piper? How is Charlotte doing now. If a book leaves me like this it is worth 5 stars.

One thing not so good was the coincidence of somethings like the lawyers birth mom happens to be a jury member. naah. too much but that is the only negative.more
I bought Handle with Care months ago but it sat on my shelf until I was in the mood to read it. Once I started reading it, I got sucked in and finished it by stealing moments when I could and feeding my kids cold cereal for dinner.

While this book did make me hug my kids a little tighter before putting them to bed, the ending made me angry. It was unnecessary as others have said. And it was cruel.

I felt like all of the characters were interesting and full of flaws like real people and just the ending bumped my rating from 4 or 5 stars to 3.

I enjoy JP's books but I do hope she doesn't follow the same formula for her next book.more
It's been a long time since I've read such a thoroughly horrible book. I'd give this zero stars if I could. It was pure dreck, through and through, and I seriously resent the time I spent with it. Every single character is unremittingly miserable and unpleasant--there is not a single character who inspires any spark of affection. The motivations for their constant destructive actions are so cliched as to be actually inexplicable, and as if that weren't enough the absurd ending leeches any possible meaning from it all. Really I think the only explanation is that Picoult is a raging nihilist masquerading as a thoughtful Issues writer. I know this was written for book groups--my bookstore job suggests that that's her primary readership--but she notches everything up to such a level of misery and indecision that nothing means anything. Except I don't think the nihilism is at all intentional so--what IS the point? There is none, I think, and that is a serious flaw in an Issues novel--it has to have a point because nothing in the plot, characters, or quality of the writing make it worth reading otherwise.more
I'm giving this book 3 stars, but only because I enjoyed reading and learning about OI. That, and it was compelling enough that I stayed up until 1 a.m. to finish it. I can't guarantee I won't come back and change it to 2 stars after I've had more time to think about it.

While reading Change of Heart, I remember thinking it was too close for (my) comfort to The Green Mile. I felt the same way reading Handle with Care - except the original book in question was one of the author's own, My Sister's Keeper (with a little bit of The Pact thrown in when it came to the adults' relationships with one another). I feel like she's just recycling plot lines and characters now (along with phrases - the sentence "It was a catch-22" appeared no less than 5 times). In my opinion, the ending was completely unnecessary and slapped on to the end of the book like an afterthought. I've enjoyed a lot of Picoult books (My Sister's Keeper, Plain Truth, The Pact, Salem Falls, etc.), but I think it's time she changed up her formula.

* That didn't take long. The more I think about it, the more problems I have with it. Changed to 2 stars.more
As others have said, Picoult's got her formula down pat. Her research is amazing and the plot keeps moving. I did find the portrayal of the older sister with an eating disorder and an addiction to cutting herself a bit too pat and it makes me wonder about the topics she explores that I don't know as well. The ending was disappointing - more melodrama than tragedy.more
This is another rich character study with incredible research by Jodi Picoult. In this story, Willow is born with brittle bone disease and will need expensive medical care and taking care of long after her parents have died. Her mother Charlotte is obsessed with the cost in money and to Willow's sister who, no doubt will be the caregiver her whole life. Charlotte sues her best friend and OB for not giving her enough information to make a better decision about carrying her pregnancy to term. It was sometimes hard to like Charlotte, her intentions were flawed but believable.more
Formulaic and overwrought but good for listening to in the car.more
Why didn’t someone warn me not to read this book? Picoult’s writing is sound, if perhaps a bit repetitive, but you do get to know and like the characters. Maybe that is the problem. She spends many pages inundating readers with all the problems caregivers cope with just to survive from one day to the next in raising a child with OI, and then, when we’re fully involved with the characters, she just yanks the rug out from under us. The resolution of the lawsuit brought by the mother against her friend and doctor was bad enough, and just when you think it couldn’t get worse, of course, it does. If you’ve read My Sister’s Keeper by the same author, you don’t need to read this one. It’s “second verse, same as the first, only really, it’s worse.” Sometimes the end of a book makes it worth the read. In this case, the end just wraps up a big disappointment. (The only thing I enjoyed about this novel was the fact that I was reading it on my brand new Kindle!)more
Typical Piccoult book, taking a controversy and creating characters to explain various sides and points of view. I listened to this as a CD and have to admit it made the story more appealing. Since there are so many characters it was nice to hear the different voices. Charlotte's daughter is diagnosed with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (what is basically brittle bone disease - extremely fragile weak bones). What if they knew earlier of Willow's disease? Is their pediatrician to fault for not diagnosing it? Would her pain and overburdened life be any better?more
I've been gradually making my way through Jodi Picoult's books -- I'd say on average I probably read maybe two each year. I respect some of the criticisms of her writing -- mainly the fact that after a while, her stories tend to be a bit formulaic. But regardless, I do enjoy her writing and especially the topics she chooses to explore, and I look forward to the usual twists at the end. "Handle With Care" centers on a child, Willow, who has Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease). Because of the rising costs of Willow's medical care, her mother decides to file a wrongful birth lawsuit against the obstetrician, who also happens to be her best friend. Wrongful birth basically states that had she known at an earlier stage that her child had a debilitating illness, she could've chosen to abort the child and avoided the upcoming heartache. That is, of course, put in extremely simplified terms & doesn't begin to explain all the associated emotions involved in something like that, but of course that's Jodi Picoult's trademark. She's good at writing controversial subject matter and is good at presenting all sides of an argument. This novel was no exception. Working in the field that I do (pediatric physical therapy), this was another of her novels that hit somewhat close to home. This was not, however, necessarily one of my favorites. I think that was primarily because I just didn't like a majority of the characters in this book, esp. Charlotte, the mother. The other thing I didn't necessarily like was the format of this one. Like almost all of Picoult's novels, the story is told in alternate points of view from each of the major characters. I'm fine with that, but in this particularly story, all of them were referring to "you" (as in speaking to Willow) in their narratives. I just didn't get what the point of that was and didn't feel it added anything to the story. As for the ending, I was waiting for the other shoe to drop as I approached the last few pages of the book. It wasn't exactly what I expected, but I can't say I'm necessarily surprised, given Picoult's track record. All in all, I enjoyed this one, even though I had a few criticisms.more
Jodi Picoult is a good writer. She brings you into the story and makes you care about the characters and the topic. She is my secret guilty pleasure. Secret because I feel that she writes books on topics that are bound to bring out strong emotions in people. She writes books on headline making stories. I don't know, it just bothers me for some reason, but I do like the books of hers that I have read.Willow has osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease. Her mother, seeing a future of mounting bills for care and quality, sues her ob-gyn for wrongful birth. Her ob-gyn happens to be her best friend.more
Having read several Picoult books in the past, I know they can be emotionally hard books to get through and only do about one a year. But this book was just a struggle period. Learning about brittle bone disease was interesting but I didn't really like any of the characters and therefore had a hardtime relating to any of them. I found myself just wanting the book to be over than really caring who won the Wrongful Birth lawsuit. The surprise ending was just the icing on the mudpie, I kind of saw it coming throughout the book given how it was written but made it seem that the time spent with this book was even more pointless. The baking references/recipes got tiring but I will attribute that to the fact that I listened to the audio verision and couln't skim them.more
I like Jodi Picoult and the kinds of issues she deals with. This book was not, in my opinion, her best. Charlotte, the mother of a handicapped child, was not as well drawn as she could have been. Her character was too single-minded in her focus to ring true. Also, has anyone read a Jodi Picoult novel where the "problem" child wasn't killed or sent away at the end?more
Fractures occur in relationships as well as in Willow O'Keefe. This is a great read, although not 'light reading', by any means. As with all Jodi Picoult's books, it is superbly written.The ending surprised me, though. I'm not sure how I feel about it, yet!more
I was expecting to be in tears throughout this whole book. That didn't happen. Everyone that has read Jodi Picoult's books have told me that her books will leaving you crying. I teared up a few times but no full blown crying. Handle with Care is the story about a child born with this rare disease called Osteogenesis Imperfecta, which is a condition causing extremely fragile bones. The story centers around a family of four, Charlotte, Sean, Amelia and Willow. Willow is the child that is born with OI. She is a very strong character and you will fall in love with her. Charlotte and Sean are two that I loved and hated at the same time. Amelia, my heart went out to her just as much as to Willow.Charlotte decides to sue her OB for wrongful Birth and the turmoil that it causes. Charlotte is best friends with her OB and this ruins a wonderful relationship. The lawsuit puts a strain on the marriage and the family. Amelia starts acting out and also looses her best friend.The ending was somewhat surprising. That is all I will say so I don't spoil the book for anyone that has not read this one.more
Handle with Care is my favourite book by Jodi Picoult. It is about this couple that have two daughters; one that was born with osteogenesis imperfecta. A condition that she will live with for her whole life, and suffer tons of broken bones and pain. One day, her mother decides to sue the doctor who helped her through the pregnancy, saying if she had known before, she would have had an abortion, so that she could get some extra money to help her daughter have a better life. There was something about it that I absolutley loved more than any of Jodi Picoult's other books. I found that this book was especally emotional and made me cry the whole way through but thats just part of the book. Handle with Care is one of the best books I have ever read and I recommend it to everyone.more
A very typical Jodi Picoult book. I couldn't sympathise with any of the lead characters, it was far too similar to "My Sister's Keeper", and I saw the end coming a mile-off. I feel like Picoult has exhausted the genre. Her books are becoming more and more derivative, and I feel she may have run out of steam. Her books are like ice-cream; a guilty pleasure, easy to digest but after too much you get sick of it.more
I keep asking myself why do I read Picoults books? They always seem so sad. But yet, I continue to pick them up and read them. I know why, they are wonderful. This one is no exception. It is sad, sweet, loving, bitter sweet. As usual, you feel all of the emotions as you dive deep in the pages. I highly recommend this book.more
I hate that I have to give this book 3 starts. I am angry about the ending. I wont reveal anything, but I just have to say that Piccoul's books are getting predictable and formulaic. I used to love her books and have even seen her speak in person and she is a phenomenal speaker. But this book made me angry and not in a good controversial way, in a why did I wast my time way. The story overall was a good story and was interesting, but the ending took any enjoyment I may have had reading it and erased it. I would NOT recommend reading this book. If you've read her other books, you've read this one.more
Deep, thought provoking and well written. What would you do if you thought your child was going to be born less than perfect? What is the value of a life? A sad look inside (what could realistically be) one family's ordeal.more
I have read all of Jodi Picoult's books and while I cant say I liked them all this one for me was the worst. It was the most depressing book I have ever read. Yes there were quite a few touching moments, the "you can do anything you set your mind to" theme ran through it but the overall tone of the book in my opinion was just depressing. Not even a happy ending.more
I read this book because my daughter has Osteogenesis Imperfecta type III just like Willow. I found this a hard book to read as it brought back many memories and emotions I buried just to keep moving forward in every day life. I had to read, put the book down, cry, and start again many times. I understand the feelings of all the characters in the book and don't pass judgement for the choices they made even if I wouldn't make the same ones. Until you've lived it, day in and day out, you can't understand how decisions are thought and actions done. It really is a survival.I thought the ending sucked and was completely unnecessary. I get having a "twist" but that was just plain stupid.more
This book has the typical Jodi Picoult formula and as usual she does an excellent job of describing the illness the story is centered around. It's a sad story, but I saw the ending coming from the beginning so I'm surprised at the number of readers who didn't expect it.Charlotte and Sean O'Keefe have two daughters, 13-year-old Amelia and 6-year-old Willow, who has osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), brittle bone disease. Charlotte sues her obstetrician for wrongful birth, or otherwise not telling her early enough in her pregnancy that the baby would be disabled so that she had the option of abortion. Charlotte would not have aborted Willow, but she is desperate to give Willow a full life and figures the malpractice award would give the family enough money so that Willow can have everything she needs that the insurance won't pay for. The twist? Piper, Charlotte's OB, is her best friend.I know Picoult showed both sides of the story to try to explain how nothing is black and white. Other people say they came around to understanding Charlotte's side, but I didn't. I don't care how broke my family is, I cannot conceive of testilying in court that I would have aborted my child if I knew she was going to be disabled. And if that's true, how could I hurt my best friend emotionally and professionally for money? No matter how much damage Charlotte saw her decision create, she kept telling herself it was for Willow's benefit, even when she went to the OI convention and saw all the people with OI who lived full lives even into adulthood.******SPOILER ALERT*********The sad thing is that after destroying her best friend's career and life, almost ruining her own marriage, and mentally damaging both of her daughters, she didn't even cash the settlement check!! She and Sean managed to care for Willow and survive without the money.*******END OF SPOILER*******Overall it was an easy read and a decent book. My Sister's Keeper is still my favorite.more
I always enjoy Jodi Pocoult books. She really goes above and beyond her research in whatever subject shes writing about. In this case, it's a child with "brittle bone disease"- a disease where the child will basically break everytime she bumps into something. There were ethical issues all over the place, as her friend was her doctor and her second child was basically born so that she could provide blood, etc to the ill child. Overall, great read that really makes you sad.more
Read all 134 reviews

Reviews

Overall not bad but not great. Typical story line for Jodi and the ending I found was just pointless and had no meaning. more
A thoroughly enjoyable book, that i did not want to end.
Then it ended, and with it went my enjoyment.
I dislike greatly when endings are so abrupt and so
shocking. It ends the book, but my frustration goes on
for a long long time.
I feel as if the author got tired and could not come up with
a proper thought out ending, so she decided to do something
totally out of character with the rest of the story and leave
us all upset and wishing for a proper end.more
great book!!more
Wow. what a book. I could not stop reading last night and normally when i wake up the first thing i do is go on the computer but this time I had to to finish it and I just did. Wow. that is the word that comes to mind.

Thought provoking to say the least. This is a book that will keep you thinking cause even though the people in the book have totally different opinions Jodi Picoult makes it so that you can feel sympathy for most of the people in the book. (Exception : Lawyer of Piper)

Finished this book maybe but not really cause I keep on thinking about it. How is Amelia now. What's wrong with Piper? How is Charlotte doing now. If a book leaves me like this it is worth 5 stars.

One thing not so good was the coincidence of somethings like the lawyers birth mom happens to be a jury member. naah. too much but that is the only negative.more
I bought Handle with Care months ago but it sat on my shelf until I was in the mood to read it. Once I started reading it, I got sucked in and finished it by stealing moments when I could and feeding my kids cold cereal for dinner.

While this book did make me hug my kids a little tighter before putting them to bed, the ending made me angry. It was unnecessary as others have said. And it was cruel.

I felt like all of the characters were interesting and full of flaws like real people and just the ending bumped my rating from 4 or 5 stars to 3.

I enjoy JP's books but I do hope she doesn't follow the same formula for her next book.more
It's been a long time since I've read such a thoroughly horrible book. I'd give this zero stars if I could. It was pure dreck, through and through, and I seriously resent the time I spent with it. Every single character is unremittingly miserable and unpleasant--there is not a single character who inspires any spark of affection. The motivations for their constant destructive actions are so cliched as to be actually inexplicable, and as if that weren't enough the absurd ending leeches any possible meaning from it all. Really I think the only explanation is that Picoult is a raging nihilist masquerading as a thoughtful Issues writer. I know this was written for book groups--my bookstore job suggests that that's her primary readership--but she notches everything up to such a level of misery and indecision that nothing means anything. Except I don't think the nihilism is at all intentional so--what IS the point? There is none, I think, and that is a serious flaw in an Issues novel--it has to have a point because nothing in the plot, characters, or quality of the writing make it worth reading otherwise.more
I'm giving this book 3 stars, but only because I enjoyed reading and learning about OI. That, and it was compelling enough that I stayed up until 1 a.m. to finish it. I can't guarantee I won't come back and change it to 2 stars after I've had more time to think about it.

While reading Change of Heart, I remember thinking it was too close for (my) comfort to The Green Mile. I felt the same way reading Handle with Care - except the original book in question was one of the author's own, My Sister's Keeper (with a little bit of The Pact thrown in when it came to the adults' relationships with one another). I feel like she's just recycling plot lines and characters now (along with phrases - the sentence "It was a catch-22" appeared no less than 5 times). In my opinion, the ending was completely unnecessary and slapped on to the end of the book like an afterthought. I've enjoyed a lot of Picoult books (My Sister's Keeper, Plain Truth, The Pact, Salem Falls, etc.), but I think it's time she changed up her formula.

* That didn't take long. The more I think about it, the more problems I have with it. Changed to 2 stars.more
As others have said, Picoult's got her formula down pat. Her research is amazing and the plot keeps moving. I did find the portrayal of the older sister with an eating disorder and an addiction to cutting herself a bit too pat and it makes me wonder about the topics she explores that I don't know as well. The ending was disappointing - more melodrama than tragedy.more
This is another rich character study with incredible research by Jodi Picoult. In this story, Willow is born with brittle bone disease and will need expensive medical care and taking care of long after her parents have died. Her mother Charlotte is obsessed with the cost in money and to Willow's sister who, no doubt will be the caregiver her whole life. Charlotte sues her best friend and OB for not giving her enough information to make a better decision about carrying her pregnancy to term. It was sometimes hard to like Charlotte, her intentions were flawed but believable.more
Formulaic and overwrought but good for listening to in the car.more
Why didn’t someone warn me not to read this book? Picoult’s writing is sound, if perhaps a bit repetitive, but you do get to know and like the characters. Maybe that is the problem. She spends many pages inundating readers with all the problems caregivers cope with just to survive from one day to the next in raising a child with OI, and then, when we’re fully involved with the characters, she just yanks the rug out from under us. The resolution of the lawsuit brought by the mother against her friend and doctor was bad enough, and just when you think it couldn’t get worse, of course, it does. If you’ve read My Sister’s Keeper by the same author, you don’t need to read this one. It’s “second verse, same as the first, only really, it’s worse.” Sometimes the end of a book makes it worth the read. In this case, the end just wraps up a big disappointment. (The only thing I enjoyed about this novel was the fact that I was reading it on my brand new Kindle!)more
Typical Piccoult book, taking a controversy and creating characters to explain various sides and points of view. I listened to this as a CD and have to admit it made the story more appealing. Since there are so many characters it was nice to hear the different voices. Charlotte's daughter is diagnosed with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (what is basically brittle bone disease - extremely fragile weak bones). What if they knew earlier of Willow's disease? Is their pediatrician to fault for not diagnosing it? Would her pain and overburdened life be any better?more
I've been gradually making my way through Jodi Picoult's books -- I'd say on average I probably read maybe two each year. I respect some of the criticisms of her writing -- mainly the fact that after a while, her stories tend to be a bit formulaic. But regardless, I do enjoy her writing and especially the topics she chooses to explore, and I look forward to the usual twists at the end. "Handle With Care" centers on a child, Willow, who has Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease). Because of the rising costs of Willow's medical care, her mother decides to file a wrongful birth lawsuit against the obstetrician, who also happens to be her best friend. Wrongful birth basically states that had she known at an earlier stage that her child had a debilitating illness, she could've chosen to abort the child and avoided the upcoming heartache. That is, of course, put in extremely simplified terms & doesn't begin to explain all the associated emotions involved in something like that, but of course that's Jodi Picoult's trademark. She's good at writing controversial subject matter and is good at presenting all sides of an argument. This novel was no exception. Working in the field that I do (pediatric physical therapy), this was another of her novels that hit somewhat close to home. This was not, however, necessarily one of my favorites. I think that was primarily because I just didn't like a majority of the characters in this book, esp. Charlotte, the mother. The other thing I didn't necessarily like was the format of this one. Like almost all of Picoult's novels, the story is told in alternate points of view from each of the major characters. I'm fine with that, but in this particularly story, all of them were referring to "you" (as in speaking to Willow) in their narratives. I just didn't get what the point of that was and didn't feel it added anything to the story. As for the ending, I was waiting for the other shoe to drop as I approached the last few pages of the book. It wasn't exactly what I expected, but I can't say I'm necessarily surprised, given Picoult's track record. All in all, I enjoyed this one, even though I had a few criticisms.more
Jodi Picoult is a good writer. She brings you into the story and makes you care about the characters and the topic. She is my secret guilty pleasure. Secret because I feel that she writes books on topics that are bound to bring out strong emotions in people. She writes books on headline making stories. I don't know, it just bothers me for some reason, but I do like the books of hers that I have read.Willow has osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease. Her mother, seeing a future of mounting bills for care and quality, sues her ob-gyn for wrongful birth. Her ob-gyn happens to be her best friend.more
Having read several Picoult books in the past, I know they can be emotionally hard books to get through and only do about one a year. But this book was just a struggle period. Learning about brittle bone disease was interesting but I didn't really like any of the characters and therefore had a hardtime relating to any of them. I found myself just wanting the book to be over than really caring who won the Wrongful Birth lawsuit. The surprise ending was just the icing on the mudpie, I kind of saw it coming throughout the book given how it was written but made it seem that the time spent with this book was even more pointless. The baking references/recipes got tiring but I will attribute that to the fact that I listened to the audio verision and couln't skim them.more
I like Jodi Picoult and the kinds of issues she deals with. This book was not, in my opinion, her best. Charlotte, the mother of a handicapped child, was not as well drawn as she could have been. Her character was too single-minded in her focus to ring true. Also, has anyone read a Jodi Picoult novel where the "problem" child wasn't killed or sent away at the end?more
Fractures occur in relationships as well as in Willow O'Keefe. This is a great read, although not 'light reading', by any means. As with all Jodi Picoult's books, it is superbly written.The ending surprised me, though. I'm not sure how I feel about it, yet!more
I was expecting to be in tears throughout this whole book. That didn't happen. Everyone that has read Jodi Picoult's books have told me that her books will leaving you crying. I teared up a few times but no full blown crying. Handle with Care is the story about a child born with this rare disease called Osteogenesis Imperfecta, which is a condition causing extremely fragile bones. The story centers around a family of four, Charlotte, Sean, Amelia and Willow. Willow is the child that is born with OI. She is a very strong character and you will fall in love with her. Charlotte and Sean are two that I loved and hated at the same time. Amelia, my heart went out to her just as much as to Willow.Charlotte decides to sue her OB for wrongful Birth and the turmoil that it causes. Charlotte is best friends with her OB and this ruins a wonderful relationship. The lawsuit puts a strain on the marriage and the family. Amelia starts acting out and also looses her best friend.The ending was somewhat surprising. That is all I will say so I don't spoil the book for anyone that has not read this one.more
Handle with Care is my favourite book by Jodi Picoult. It is about this couple that have two daughters; one that was born with osteogenesis imperfecta. A condition that she will live with for her whole life, and suffer tons of broken bones and pain. One day, her mother decides to sue the doctor who helped her through the pregnancy, saying if she had known before, she would have had an abortion, so that she could get some extra money to help her daughter have a better life. There was something about it that I absolutley loved more than any of Jodi Picoult's other books. I found that this book was especally emotional and made me cry the whole way through but thats just part of the book. Handle with Care is one of the best books I have ever read and I recommend it to everyone.more
A very typical Jodi Picoult book. I couldn't sympathise with any of the lead characters, it was far too similar to "My Sister's Keeper", and I saw the end coming a mile-off. I feel like Picoult has exhausted the genre. Her books are becoming more and more derivative, and I feel she may have run out of steam. Her books are like ice-cream; a guilty pleasure, easy to digest but after too much you get sick of it.more
I keep asking myself why do I read Picoults books? They always seem so sad. But yet, I continue to pick them up and read them. I know why, they are wonderful. This one is no exception. It is sad, sweet, loving, bitter sweet. As usual, you feel all of the emotions as you dive deep in the pages. I highly recommend this book.more
I hate that I have to give this book 3 starts. I am angry about the ending. I wont reveal anything, but I just have to say that Piccoul's books are getting predictable and formulaic. I used to love her books and have even seen her speak in person and she is a phenomenal speaker. But this book made me angry and not in a good controversial way, in a why did I wast my time way. The story overall was a good story and was interesting, but the ending took any enjoyment I may have had reading it and erased it. I would NOT recommend reading this book. If you've read her other books, you've read this one.more
Deep, thought provoking and well written. What would you do if you thought your child was going to be born less than perfect? What is the value of a life? A sad look inside (what could realistically be) one family's ordeal.more
I have read all of Jodi Picoult's books and while I cant say I liked them all this one for me was the worst. It was the most depressing book I have ever read. Yes there were quite a few touching moments, the "you can do anything you set your mind to" theme ran through it but the overall tone of the book in my opinion was just depressing. Not even a happy ending.more
I read this book because my daughter has Osteogenesis Imperfecta type III just like Willow. I found this a hard book to read as it brought back many memories and emotions I buried just to keep moving forward in every day life. I had to read, put the book down, cry, and start again many times. I understand the feelings of all the characters in the book and don't pass judgement for the choices they made even if I wouldn't make the same ones. Until you've lived it, day in and day out, you can't understand how decisions are thought and actions done. It really is a survival.I thought the ending sucked and was completely unnecessary. I get having a "twist" but that was just plain stupid.more
This book has the typical Jodi Picoult formula and as usual she does an excellent job of describing the illness the story is centered around. It's a sad story, but I saw the ending coming from the beginning so I'm surprised at the number of readers who didn't expect it.Charlotte and Sean O'Keefe have two daughters, 13-year-old Amelia and 6-year-old Willow, who has osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), brittle bone disease. Charlotte sues her obstetrician for wrongful birth, or otherwise not telling her early enough in her pregnancy that the baby would be disabled so that she had the option of abortion. Charlotte would not have aborted Willow, but she is desperate to give Willow a full life and figures the malpractice award would give the family enough money so that Willow can have everything she needs that the insurance won't pay for. The twist? Piper, Charlotte's OB, is her best friend.I know Picoult showed both sides of the story to try to explain how nothing is black and white. Other people say they came around to understanding Charlotte's side, but I didn't. I don't care how broke my family is, I cannot conceive of testilying in court that I would have aborted my child if I knew she was going to be disabled. And if that's true, how could I hurt my best friend emotionally and professionally for money? No matter how much damage Charlotte saw her decision create, she kept telling herself it was for Willow's benefit, even when she went to the OI convention and saw all the people with OI who lived full lives even into adulthood.******SPOILER ALERT*********The sad thing is that after destroying her best friend's career and life, almost ruining her own marriage, and mentally damaging both of her daughters, she didn't even cash the settlement check!! She and Sean managed to care for Willow and survive without the money.*******END OF SPOILER*******Overall it was an easy read and a decent book. My Sister's Keeper is still my favorite.more
I always enjoy Jodi Pocoult books. She really goes above and beyond her research in whatever subject shes writing about. In this case, it's a child with "brittle bone disease"- a disease where the child will basically break everytime she bumps into something. There were ethical issues all over the place, as her friend was her doctor and her second child was basically born so that she could provide blood, etc to the ill child. Overall, great read that really makes you sad.more
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