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A monster-hunting doctor and his apprentice face off against a plague of monsters in the first book of a terrifying series. Publishers Weekly says “horror lovers will be rapt.”

These are the secrets I have kept. So starts the diary of Will Henry, orphan and assistant to a doctor with a most unusual specialty: monster hunting. In the short time he has lived with the doctor in nineteenth-century New England, Will has grown accustomed to his late-night callers and dangerous business. But when one visitor comes with the body of a young girl and the monster that was eating her, Will’s world changes forever. The doctor has discovered a baby Anthropophagus—a headless monster that feeds through a mouth in its chest—and it signals a growing number of Anthropophagi. Will and the doctor must face the horror threatening to overtake and consume the world…before it is too late.

The Monstrumologist is the first stunning gothic adventure in a series that combines the terror of HP Lovecraft with the spirit of Arthur Conan Doyle.
Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on Sep 22, 2009
ISBN: 9781439152614
List price: $7.99
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As a fan of Stephen King and thrillers, I had high expectations for Monstrumologist by Rick Yancy. The gothic horror is becoming an increasingly popular genre. Set during the Victorian era, it will appeal to young people who like gore and horror. Unfortunately, I'm not sure the writing style matches the young audience horror fan. The book reminded me of a cross between Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and might get some young people interested in reading these classic works.I didn't have a hard time visualizing the monsters. However I agree with those that thought they were more "morbid" than "scary". I was looking for a little more suspense. I wanted to know more about the monsters and was hoping for more encounters. The long sections of character development could have been condensed to provide more space for Anthropophagi.Although I enjoyed the book, I don't think I'll follow the series.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One of the freakiest books I've ever read....and the most discriptive. A man is given old diaries that are too disturbijng to be true, and the reader finds themselves utterly involved with the characters and a bloody disturbing sci-fi mystery.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
First of all a very serious warning. Do not read this book unless you are prepared to face monsters of all forms - up close and personal. I mean so close you will be able to smell them and taste them. Monsters that are large, those that are miniscule, monsters unknown and monsters commonplace. Monsters that live deep in your mind and those that live at the core of every person's soul. If you start reading and feel uneasy after meeting your first monster - then stop reading - go no further. If you go on and find yourself unbearably horrified - then stop there - go no further. In other words, it doesn't get any better, the horror grows exponentially worse before the end. With that stated, this is one of the best horror novels I have ever read. It does perfectly what it sets out to accomplish. You may be the most jaded horror fan, you may laugh at the very thought of monsters. Before reaching very far into this novel, you will be bolting your door and checking your windows. You will lose sleep over the thickness of the glass - and it's inability to bar you from beasts that are heedless of caution. And that will only be the beginning.The monstrumologist is a scientific Doctor who studies and eradicates monsters. He has a very young apprentice named Will, who must do all that the Doctor bids, and learn to cope with unrelenting horror as a result of their association. The Doctor's work moves swiftly from theory to practicum, following a knock on the door late one night.They are never the same again. I venture to suggest - neither is the reader.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

As a fan of Stephen King and thrillers, I had high expectations for Monstrumologist by Rick Yancy. The gothic horror is becoming an increasingly popular genre. Set during the Victorian era, it will appeal to young people who like gore and horror. Unfortunately, I'm not sure the writing style matches the young audience horror fan. The book reminded me of a cross between Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and might get some young people interested in reading these classic works.I didn't have a hard time visualizing the monsters. However I agree with those that thought they were more "morbid" than "scary". I was looking for a little more suspense. I wanted to know more about the monsters and was hoping for more encounters. The long sections of character development could have been condensed to provide more space for Anthropophagi.Although I enjoyed the book, I don't think I'll follow the series.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One of the freakiest books I've ever read....and the most discriptive. A man is given old diaries that are too disturbijng to be true, and the reader finds themselves utterly involved with the characters and a bloody disturbing sci-fi mystery.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
First of all a very serious warning. Do not read this book unless you are prepared to face monsters of all forms - up close and personal. I mean so close you will be able to smell them and taste them. Monsters that are large, those that are miniscule, monsters unknown and monsters commonplace. Monsters that live deep in your mind and those that live at the core of every person's soul. If you start reading and feel uneasy after meeting your first monster - then stop reading - go no further. If you go on and find yourself unbearably horrified - then stop there - go no further. In other words, it doesn't get any better, the horror grows exponentially worse before the end. With that stated, this is one of the best horror novels I have ever read. It does perfectly what it sets out to accomplish. You may be the most jaded horror fan, you may laugh at the very thought of monsters. Before reaching very far into this novel, you will be bolting your door and checking your windows. You will lose sleep over the thickness of the glass - and it's inability to bar you from beasts that are heedless of caution. And that will only be the beginning.The monstrumologist is a scientific Doctor who studies and eradicates monsters. He has a very young apprentice named Will, who must do all that the Doctor bids, and learn to cope with unrelenting horror as a result of their association. The Doctor's work moves swiftly from theory to practicum, following a knock on the door late one night.They are never the same again. I venture to suggest - neither is the reader.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was gory... unfortunately it was the SAME gory over and over again. I wish the author had left more to the imagination - it would have been creepier. The story moved right along though and I liked the writing, usually. Some of the affectations seemed a bit... well, affected. "Reader! You will tremble to read what happened next..." and such.

Good for younger fans of Frankenstein, Dracula, who maybe would like a little more gore.
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I got this book on loan from a friend. It sounds like a very intriguing read. In most ways it is an exceptional book, but only for those with strong stomachs. There is another Monstrumologist book coming out October 2010 called The Curse of the Wendigo. This first book is a very complete book and story all by itself.Will Henry is young boy who is an apprentice to a monstrumologist, Dr. Warthrop. He is used to strange visitors in the middle of the night, but one late night a visitor brings the Dr. a monster unlike anything Will has ever seen. The monster is an Anthropophagus and its natural prey is humankind. Dr. Warthrop and Will Henry must solve the mystery behind the Anthropophagus's appearance before the monsters eviscerate and eat the whole village.This book is set in the late 1880's and has a very dark, gothic tone to it. There are scenes of intense action, but most of the book is reasoning and gory science. The whole concept to this book is that someone found three folio's of stories; this book contains those three folios. The original finders are trying to decide if the folios are fiction or fact. You only hear from the modern day finders in the Prologue and the Epilogue; the rest of the book are the folios from Will's perspective.This book is different from any book I have read. It puts science behind monster hunting and prefers a philosophical approach to monster hunting rather than a guns blazing approach. The writing is done in the style of the era it represents; a bit over-descriptive and flowery at time. Dr. Warthrop is at both times brilliant and harsh, but when he contacts fellow monster-hunter Jack Keane then we find out what true harshness is. Jack Keane is an interesting character; he is an overly jaunty Englishman that is almost more of a monster than the monsters he hunts.Some of the book is spent on talking about the loneliness of Dr. Warthrop's profession and how this affects Will Henry. Much thought goes into the meaning of death, the fragility of humanity, and the way humanity acts as a whole. Dr. Warthrop often digresses into deep philosophical conversations when Will Henry asks him the simplest of questions: such as "Where is my hat?" leads to a two page rant on the evils of being attached to material objects.What will strike most people about this book though is the gore. Nothing nasty, grisly, or gory is left untouched, in fact it is delved into in great detail. I didn't find the book itself to be particularly scary (and I am a wuss about scary books) but the gory detail in which things were described made me physically nauseous a number of times. So readers with a weak stomach should beware.The only complaint I have about this book is that it gets a bit wordy at points. I think some of the wordiness could have been cut out and it would have been a better book. That and the extreme goriness bothered me at times. Other than that this is a very creative, spooky, and interesting read. It is a book that manages to give an interesting historical representation of the era, one that touches on deeper aspects of the fragility of humanity and on what it means to be a monster, and it manages to be about plain good ole monster hunting to boot.Overall I really enjoyed it. It is very well-written, very creative, and extremely interesting. I personally couldn't read it while eating lunch because of the extreme goriness. As far as it being a young adult book I would recommend it for older young adults. There is a lot of violence, people being torn to shreds, gore and evilness in this book. As an adult it was a bit much for me and this is definitely not a book for younger kids.
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In short: The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey is a masterpiece, a thrilling horror with exquisite writing and terrifying monsters.Monsters are real and some of them come in the form of headless seven foot tall hominoids with thousands of razor-sharp teeth in their stomachs, called Anthropophagi. Oh, how refreshing to read about monsters that want to rip you to shreds rather than the more romantic fare that we are so used to in YA these days! The Monstrumologist is horror at its best: terrifying and thrilling, enthralling and unputdownable, despite the absolutely nightmarish horror of the events.I don't often comment on the writing in books but I simply must do so for Rick Yancey's writing. The Monstrumologist is definitely the best written book I've read this year. The prose is mesmerizing and rich and portions of it left me in complete awe. With a few well crafted phrases, Rick Yancey can paint a horrifying image that becomes imprinted in your brain and follows you long after you finish reading. There are a few terrifyingly gorgeous images from The Monstrumologist that I will never, ever forget.I wouldn't say the writing style made The Monstrumologist an easy read, however. Taking place in Victorian New England, there were quite a few words and terms that went over my head. I needed to read The Monstrumologist with a dictionary in my other hand. I don't see this as being a negative point though. I love feeling challenged and I love that Rick Yancey didn't dumb down his writing and in the process, patronize the reader.I was also very impressed with the attention to detail with regards to the biological aspect of The Monstrumologist. Coming from a science background, I often nitpick instances in books where there are scientific falsities that the author failed to research when writing. I am happy to report that I found nothing of the sort to nitpick in The Monstrumologist. Rick Yancey's knowledge of evolutionary adaptations and anatomy was evident, of which I was very appreciative.And lastly, the characters in The Monstrumologist were brilliantly written, perfectly developed, and completely intriguing. I loved the dynamic between the monstrumologist, Dr. Warthrop, and his twelve year old assistant, Will Henry. The Monstrumologist is told as if written from Will Henry's journal and follows Will Henry and Dr. Warthrop's monster hunting adventures together. They have two very different personalities that often warred (Dr. Warthrop is egocentric and obsessed with his work and Will Henry is sweet and brave and honourable) but you could tell they care for each other deeply as they are the only person in each other's life.Overall, The Monstrumologist was absolutely fantastic (and other people must agree because it won a Printz Honour award)! Certain passages left me awed and breathless, they were so well written and horribly horrifying. I highly recommend The Monstrumologist to fans of horror and historical fiction. I can't wait to read more of Will Henry and Dr. Warthrop's monster hunting adventures in the sequel, The Curse of the Wendigo!
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